National Academies Press: OpenBook

Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030 (2018)

Chapter: Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas

« Previous: Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page 135
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page 136
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page 137
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page 138
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page 139
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page 140
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page 141

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix B Open Session Meeting Agendas MEETING 1 AGENDA June 14, 2017 National Academy of Sciences Building, Room 125 WEDNESDAY, June 14 OPEN SESSION 1:00–1:15 p.m. Welcome and Introductions Dr. John D. Floros and Dr. Susan R. Wessler, Committee Co-Chairs 1:15–1:30 p.m. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Study Process and Committee’s Statement of Task Mrs. Peggy T. Yih, Study Director 1:30–1:40 p.m. Origins of Study Request Dr. Robert Easter, University of Illinois (Emeritus) 1:40–2:10 p.m. Charge to the Committee from the Sponsors Dr. Robert Easter, University of Illinois (Emeritus) Dr. Sally Rockey, Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research 2:10–2:50 p.m. Potential for the Study to Advance Food and Agricultural Research: U.S. Department of Agriculture Panel Dr. Mary Bohman, USDA Economic Research Service Dr. Meryl Broussard, USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Dr. Steve Kappes, USDA Agricultural Research Service Dr. Joe Parsons, USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Dr. Dionne Toombs, USDA Office of the Chief Scientist 2:50–3:00 p.m. Break 3:00–3:30 p.m. Science Frontiers of Interest Dr. Todd Anderson, Department of Energy Dr. Jane Silverthorne, National Science Foundation 3:30–3:50 p.m. Decadal Vision for Plant Biology Mr. Tyrone Spady, American Association of Plant Biologists 3:50–4:10 p.m. Challenge of Change—Recently Released Report Dr. Samantha Alvis, Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities Prepublication Copy 135

Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030 4:10–4:30 p.m. Agricultural and Applied Economic Priorities and Solutions Ms. Caron Gala, Council on Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics 4:30–4:50 p.m. Nutrition, Health, and Agriculture Dr. Daniel J. Raiten, National Institutes of Health 4:50–5:10 p.m. Public Comments 5:10–5:15 p.m. Co-Chair’s Closing Remarks Dr. John D. Floros and Dr. Susan R. Wessler, Committee Co-Chairs 5:15 p.m. Adjourn Meeting for Day 1 TOWN HALL AGENDA August 8, 2017 National Academy of Sciences Building, Fred Kavli Auditorium TUESDAY, August 8 OPEN SESSION 7:30–8:25 a.m. Working Breakfast for Committee and Panelists (Members’ Room) 8:30–8:45 a.m. Co-Chair’s Welcome Remarks Dr. John Floros and Dr. Sue Wessler, Committee Co-Chairs 8:45–10:30 a.m. Panel 1: Food Production Lead speaker will provide a 5-minute overview, and will then provide 10-minute remarks about the greatest challenges and opportunities in their area of expertise. Each panelist will provide 5- to 10-minute formal remarks about the greatest challenges and opportunities in their area of expertise. After panelists have provided formal remarks, there will be a moderated discussion with panelists, committee, and members of the audience (in-person and online). Lead speaker: Overview of Food Production & Animal Science Priorities Dr. Ronnie Green, University of Nebraska (via videoconference) Improving Photosynthetic Efficiency for Improved Yield Dr. Donald Ort, U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service and University of Illinois Postharvest Reduction of Food Waste: A Magic Bullet? Dr. Daryl Lund, University of Wisconsin–Madison Computing Reimagined Dr. Tim Dalton, IBM Watson Science of Communication Dr. Dietram Scheufele, University of Wisconsin –Madison 136 Prepublication Copy

Appendix B Moderated Discussion (with panelists, committee, and members of the audience) Co-Moderators: Dr. Robin Lougee and Dr. Alison Van Eenennaam, Committee Members 10:30–10:40 a.m. Key Take-Away Messages from Panel Discussions Dr. John Floros, Committee Co-chair 10:40–10:55 a.m. Break Coffee break in Great Hall 10:55–11:15 a.m. The Promise of Plant Probiotics: A Potential Ag Revolution Dr. Jeff Dangl, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (via videoconference) 11:15–11:35 a.m. Diets, Environmental Sustainability, and Human Health Dr. David Tilman, University of Minnesota (via videoconference) 11:35 a.m.–12:00 p.m. Public Comments 12:00–1:00 p.m. Lunch Working lunch for committee, speakers, and panelists in Members’ Room 1:00–2:45 p.m. Panel 2: Sustainability and Efficiency Lead speaker will provide a 5-minute overview and will then provide 10-minute remarks about the greatest challenges and opportunities in their area of expertise. Each panelist will provide 5- to 10-minute formal remarks about the greatest challenges and opportunities in their area of expertise. After panelists have provided formal remarks, there will be a moderated discussion with panelists, committee, and members of the audience (in-person and online). Lead speaker: Convergence of Innovations for Sustainable Outcomes Dr. James Jones, University of Florida Soils Dr. Rattan Lal, The Ohio State University The Great Nitrogen Imbalance Dr. Phil Robertson, Michigan State University Designing for Sustainable and Resilient Human Environmental Agricultural Systems Dr. Meagan Mauter, Carnegie Mellon University Moderated Discussion (with panelists, committee, and members of the audience) Co-Moderators: Dr. Greg Lowry and Dr. Mary Lou Guerinot, Committee Members 2:45–2:55 p.m. Key Take-Away Messages from Panel Discussions Dr. Sue Wessler, Committee Co-chair 2:55–3:10 p.m. Break Coffee break in Great Hall 3:10–4:55 p.m. Panel 3: Human Health Prepublication Copy 137

Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030 Lead speaker will provide a 5-minute overview, and will then provide 10-minute remarks about the greatest challenges and opportunities in their area of expertise. Each panelist will provide 5- to 10-minute formal remarks about the greatest challenges and opportunities in their area of expertise. After panelists have provided formal remarks, there will be a moderated discussion with panelists, committee, and members of the audience (in-person and online). Lead speaker: Nutrition and Agricultural Production: Human Health as the Ultimate Mission, Dr. Pamela Starke-Reed, USDA-ARS Nutrition, Food, and Health Dr. Barbara Schneeman, University of California, Davis Bridging Two Worlds with Technology and Networks Dr. Mary Torrence, Food and Drug Administration Importance of Understanding Behavioral Responses to Food & Health Policies Dr. Jayson Lusk, Purdue University Moderated Discussion (with panelists, committee, and members of the audience) Moderator: Dr. Helen Jensen, Committee Member 4:55–5:05 p.m. Key Take-Away Messages from Panel Discussions Dr. John Floros, Committee Co-Chair 5:05–5:25 p.m. Public Comments Please sign up in person at the registration table 5:25–5:30 p.m. Closing Remarks Dr. John Floros and Dr. Sue Wessler, Committee Co-Chairs 5:30 p.m. Adjourn Meeting JAMBOREE WORKSHOP AGENDA October 2-4, 2017 Beckman Center, Irvine, CA MONDAY, October 2 8:30 a.m. Auditorium Welcome and Introduction, Committee Co-Chairs 8:45 a.m. Jamboree Participant Warm-Up: Lightning Round Questions 10:15 a.m. Summary of Lightning Round and Charge to the Group, Committee Co-chairs 10:30 a.m. Atrium Break 10:45 a.m. Auditorium Keynote: A Vision for the Future of Agricultural Research Cathie Woteki, former Chief Scientist & Undersecretary for Research, Education, and Economics, USDA 138 Prepublication Copy

Appendix B 11:45 a.m. Objectives of Breakout Session #1 12:00 p.m. Dining Room Lunch 12:45 p.m. Various Rooms Breakout Session #1: Identifying the Biggest Problems in Food and Agriculture 3:00 p.m. Atrium Break 3:30 p.m. Auditorium Plenary Report Out 4:45 p.m. Plenary Discussion 5:45 p.m. Atrium Reception TUESDAY, October 3 8:15 a.m. Auditorium Objectives for Breakout Session #2 8:45 a.m. Various Rooms Breakout Session #2: Understanding the Scientific Challenges, Knowledge, and Research Gaps 10:30 a.m. Atrium Break 11:00 a.m. Auditorium Plenary Report Out 11:50 a.m. Plenary Discussion 12:30 p.m. Dining Room Lunch 1:15 p.m. Auditorium Keynote: Enhancing Collaboration to Accelerate Agricultural Advancement Jack Odle, North Carolina State University 1:55 p.m. Objectives for Breakout Session #3 2:00 p.m. Various Rooms Breakout Session #3: Scientific Tools and Capabilities Needed 3:15 p.m. Atrium Break 3:45 p.m. Auditorium Plenary Report Out 4:20 p.m. Plenary Discussion—Where Are Overlaps and Synergies? 5:20 p.m. Objectives for Breakout Session #4 5:30 p.m. Adjourn for the day WEDNESDAY, October 4 8:30 a.m. Various Rooms Breakout Session #4: Science Breakthroughs for Overcoming Prepublication Copy 139

Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030 the Challenges in the Next 10+ Years: Describing Solutions, Scientific Opportunities, and Future Directions 10:00 a.m. Atrium/Lawn Break (coffee in Atrium, food on Lawn) 10:15 a.m. Various Rooms Breakout Session #4, cont. 11:45 a.m. Dining Room Lunch (Please clear the dining room by 12:30 p.m. to allow staff to prepare for the afternoon plenary session. You are welcome to enjoy our outdoor space for the remainder of your lunch.) 1:00 p.m. Plenary Report Out 1:45 p.m. Plenary Discussion: Issues raised during final report out 2:15 p.m. Plenary Discussion: What have we missed? 3:15 p.m. Closing Remarks, Committee Co-chairs 3:30 p.m. Adjourn JAMBOREE WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS L. Garry Adams, Texas A&M University Michael Doyle, University of Georgia Robert (Bob) Allen, IBM Almaden Research Center Jillian Fry, Johns Hopkins University Ray Asebedo, Kansas State University Jagger Harvey, Kansas State University Vanessa Bailey, Pacific Northwest National Lab Dennis Heldman, The Ohio State University Julia Bailey-Serres, University of California, David Hennessy, Michigan State University Riverside Georg Jander, Boyce Thompson Institute Lance Baumgard, University of Arizona Xingen Lei, Cornell University Steve Briggs, University of California, San Diego Carmen Moraru, Cornell University Jean Buzby, USDA-ERS Dawn Nagel, University of California, Riverside Don Cooper, Mobile Assay Inc. Jack Odle, North Carolina State University Mark Cooper, DuPont Pioneer Joseph Puglisi, Stanford University School Ryan Cox, HATponics, Inc. of Medicine Sean Cutler, University of California, Riverside Chuck Rice, Kansas State University Jorge Delgado, USDA-ARS Carly Sakumura, NASA Jet Propulsion Lab Daniel Devlin, Kansas State University Lisa Schulte-Moore, Iowa State University 140 Prepublication Copy

Appendix B Soroosh Sorooshian, University of California, Irvine George Vellidis, University of Georgia Jim Stack, Kansas State University Matthew Wallenstein, Colorado State University Laura Taylor, North Carolina University Cathie Woteki, former USDA Chris Topp, Donald Danforth Plant Hongwei Xin, Iowa State University Science Center Michael Udvardi, Noble Research Institute WEBINARS October 27, 2017 Webinar: Food Science Research Breakthroughs Gregory Ray Ziegler, Pennsylvania State University Devin Peterson, The Ohio State University John Hayes, Pennsylvania State University October 30, 2017 Webinar: Phosphorus Availability and Management Philippe Hinsinger, French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA) UMR Eco&Sols November 3, 2017 Webinar: Water Resources and Agriculture Upmanu Lall, Columbia University November 8, 2017 Webinar: Sensors in Food and Agriculture Abraham Duncan Stroock, Cornell University Suresh Neethirajan, University of Guelph November 9, 2017 Webinar: Integrating Agriculture into the Built Environment Part I Peter Groffman, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies November 10, 2017 Webinar: Integrating Agriculture into the Built Environment Part II Michael Hamm, Michigan State University Ed Harwood, Aerofarms Prepublication Copy 141

Next: Appendix C: IdeaBuzz Submissions Synopsis and Contributors »
Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030 Get This Book
×
Buy Prepub | $69.00 Buy Paperback | $60.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

For nearly a century, scientific advances have fueled progress in U.S. agriculture to enable American producers to deliver safe and abundant food domestically and provide a trade surplus in bulk and high-value agricultural commodities and foods. Today, the U.S. food and agricultural enterprise faces formidable challenges that will test its long-term sustainability, competitiveness, and resilience. On its current path, future productivity in the U.S. agricultural system is likely to come with trade-offs. The success of agriculture is tied to natural systems, and these systems are showing signs of stress, even more so with the change in climate.

More than a third of the food produced is unconsumed, an unacceptable loss of food and nutrients at a time of heightened global food demand. Increased food animal production to meet greater demand will generate more greenhouse gas emissions and excess animal waste. The U.S. food supply is generally secure, but is not immune to the costly and deadly shocks of continuing outbreaks of food-borne illness or to the constant threat of pests and pathogens to crops, livestock, and poultry. U.S. farmers and producers are at the front lines and will need more tools to manage the pressures they face.

Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030 identifies innovative, emerging scientific advances for making the U.S. food and agricultural system more efficient, resilient, and sustainable. This report explores the availability of relatively new scientific developments across all disciplines that could accelerate progress toward these goals. It identifies the most promising scientific breakthroughs that could have the greatest positive impact on food and agriculture, and that are possible to achieve in the next decade (by 2030).

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!