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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Advancing Obesity Solutions Through Investments in the Built Environment: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25074.
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References

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Advancing Obesity Solutions Through Investments in the Built Environment: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25074.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Advancing Obesity Solutions Through Investments in the Built Environment: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25074.
×

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Advancing Obesity Solutions Through Investments in the Built Environment: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25074.
×

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Advancing Obesity Solutions Through Investments in the Built Environment: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25074.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Advancing Obesity Solutions Through Investments in the Built Environment: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25074.
×
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Advancing Obesity Solutions Through Investments in the Built Environment: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25074.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Advancing Obesity Solutions Through Investments in the Built Environment: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25074.
×
Page 70
Next: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda »
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The built environment—the physical world made up of the homes, buildings, streets, and infrastructure within which people live, work, and play—underwent changes during the 20th and 21st centuries that contributed to a sharp decline in physical activity and affected access to healthy foods. Those developments contributed in turn to the weight gain observed among Americans in recent decades. Many believe, therefore, that policies and practices that affect the built environment could affect obesity rates in the United States and improve the health of Americans.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop in September 2017 to improve understanding of the roles played by the built environment in the prevention and treatment of obesity and to identify promising strategies in multiple sectors that can be scaled up to create more healthful and equitable environments. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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