National Academies Press: OpenBook
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Spot Painting to Extend Highway Bridge Coating Life: Volume 1: Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25089.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Spot Painting to Extend Highway Bridge Coating Life: Volume 1: Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25089.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Spot Painting to Extend Highway Bridge Coating Life: Volume 1: Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25089.
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Page iv
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Spot Painting to Extend Highway Bridge Coating Life: Volume 1: Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25089.
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NCHRP Web-Only Document 251: Spot Painting to Extend Highway Bridge Coating Life Volume 1: Guidance Theodore Hopwood II Sudhir Palle Bobby Meade Rick Younce Danny Wells Christopher Goff Kentucky Transportation Center University of Kentucky Lexington, Kentucky Guidance from NCHRP Project 14-30 Submitted January 2018 ACKNOWLEDGMENT This work was sponsored by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration, and was conducted in the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP), which is administered by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Authors herein are responsible for the authenticity of their materials and for obtaining written permissions from publishers or persons who own the copyright to any previously published or copyrighted material used herein. Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) grants permission to reproduce material in this publication for classroom and not-for-profit purposes. Permission is given with the understanding that none of the material will be used to imply TRB, AASHTO, FAA, FHWA, FMCSA, FRA, FTA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology, PHMSA, or TDC endorsement of a particular product, method, or practice. It is expected that those reproducing the material in this document for educational and not-for-profit uses will give appropriate acknowledgment of the source of any reprinted or reproduced material. For other uses of the material, request permission from CRP. DISCLAIMER The opinions and conclusions expressed or implied in this report are those of the researchers who performed the research. They are not necessarily those of the Transportation Research Board; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; or the program sponsors. The information contained in this document was taken directly from the submission of the author(s). This material has not been edited by TRB.

The National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, non- governmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia McNutt is president. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to bring the practices of engineering to advising the nation. Members are elected by their peers for extraordinary contributions to engineering. Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., is president. The National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) was established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues. Members are elected by their peers for distinguished contributions to medicine and health. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president. The three Academies work together as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. The National Academies also encourage education and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding in matters of science, engineering, and medicine. Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at www.national-academies.org. The Transportation Research Board is one of seven major programs of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The mission of the Transportation Research Board is to increase the benefits that transportation contributes to society by providing leadership in transportation innovation and progress through research and information exchange, conducted within a setting that is objective, interdisciplinary, and multimodal. The Board’s varied committees, task forces, and panels annually engage about 7,000 engineers, scientists, and other transportation researchers and practitioners from the public and private sectors and academia, all of whom contribute their expertise in the public interest. The program is supported by state transportation departments, federal agencies including the component administrations of the U.S. Department of Transportation, and other organizations and individuals interested in the development of transportation. Learn more about the Transportation Research Board at www.TRB.org.

NCHRP Project 14-30 iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The research reported herein was performed under NCHRP 14-30 by the Kentucky Transportation Center at the University of Kentucky. The University of Kentucky is the contractor for this study, and Theodore Hopwood II P.E., Program Manager – Bridge Preservation, is the principal investigator. The other contributing authors of this report are Sudhir Palle, Bobby W. Meade, Rick Younce, Danny Wells and Christopher Goff. The authors would like to thank Mr. Derrick Castle, Project Development Manager – Bridge and Highway, of The Sherwin Williams Company for assisting us in reviewing Section 3 “Coatings for Spot Painting” of this guide. The authors would also like to thank the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet for allowing us access to several bridges to implement procedures for field spot painting presented in this guide. Finally, the contribution and guidance of the NCHRP Panel should be mentioned. Without their hard work and diligence in providing comments, this work would not have been successfully completed.

iv Acknowledgments ..................................................................................................................... iv 1.0 OVERVIEW ............................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 OPPORTUNITIES TO USE SPOT PAINTING ....................................................................... 4 2.1 Maintenance Painting Options ............................................................................................. 5 2.2 Coating Condition Assessments .......................................................................................... 7 2.3 Coating Decision Making ..................................................................................................... 9 3.0 COATINGS FOR SPOT PAINTING ..................................................................................... 10 3.1 Structural Coating Types ................................................................................................... 10 3.2 Coating Systems for Prepared (Profiled) Steel Substrates ................................................ 15 3.3 Coatings for Marginally Prepared Substrates .................................................................... 16 3.4 User Friendly Coatings ...................................................................................................... 18 3.5 Service Life Expectations of Spot Coating Systems .......................................................... 21 3.6 Spot Coatings Systems and Serviceability of Existing Coating Systems ........................... 22 3.7 Compatibility Issues between Spot and Existing Coatings ................................................ 23 3.8 Climate Restrictions for Spot Coatings .............................................................................. 25 3.9 Non-Traditional Coatings/Materials .................................................................................... 25 3.10 Coating Manufacturer Product and Safety Data Sheets .................................................. 27 4.0 SPOT PAINTING OF STEEL BRIDGES .............................................................................. 31 4.1 Mobilize the Painting Operation ......................................................................................... 31 5.0 WORKER SAFETY AND COMPLIANCE WITH ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS ....... 59 5.1 Worker Safety .................................................................................................................... 59 5.2 Environmental Compliance ................................................................................................ 65 ABBREVIATIONS, ACRONYMS, INITIALISMS AND SYMBOLS ............................................ 71 APPENDIX A Instructions for Conducting Field Coating Condition Assessments ........... 72 APPENDIX B Florida DOT Coating Assessment Form ......................................................... 77 APPENDIX C List of Equipment for Field Coating Assessment (MnDOT) .......................... 79 APPENDIX D List of Potential Equipment for Spot Painting ................................................ 81 APPENDIX E List of Reference Documents by Chapter ....................................................... 84 Contents

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TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 251: Spot Painting to Extend Highway Bridge Coating Life: Volume 1: Guidance provides approaches for employing spot painting in a cost-effective, safe, and environmentally compliant manner. Bridge coatings are the primary means of corrosion protection for steel bridges in the United States. Most bridge coatings tend to fail prematurely in localized areas and spot painting can be used restore the lost corrosion protection and extend the service lives of existing bridge coatings, often at a fraction of the cost of a complete bridge repainting. However, many state highway agencies do not perform spot painting primarily due to performance concerns and lack of familiarity with its proper utilization and execution.

The guidance is accompanied by NCHRP Web-Only Document 251: Volume 2: Research Overview provides the evaluation method for the guidance document.

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