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Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers (2018)

Chapter: Appendix D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25109.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25109.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25109.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25109.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25109.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25109.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25109.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25109.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25109.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25109.
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D-1 APPENDIX D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships D-1 APPENDIX D: Respondent Agency MOD Relationships Appendix D describes projects of the respondents to the survey questionnaire, including agency projects that were not the subject of questionnaire responses. Highlighted aspects of projects include whether they are pilots (P), deliver first- mile/last-mile service (FMLM), are in planning stages only (*), and/or involve integrated trip planning and/or payment apps (IA). Unless otherwise indicated projects do not involve federal funding, nor replace previous fixed-route or paratransit service; project descriptions are based on questionnaire responses and email correspondence (on file with the author). Projects not covered by questionnaire responses are noted (X) as such. 1. Altamonte Springs [The city, not a transit agency] (P): Altamonte Springs (the City) contracted with Uber to provide feeder service to SunRail stations during a one-year pilot period (March 4, 2016 through July 5, 2017). During the pilot, Uber users were able to input a promo code to receive a subsidized ride within geo-fenced areas, with the City paying 25% of the first $25 of the cost of Uber rides to and from the Altamonte Springs SunRail station, and 20% of the first $25 of the cost of Uber rides anywhere in Altamonte Springs. The pilot was renewed for a second phase in July 2017, to extend through July 5, 2018. Under the second phase trips beginning in additional local areas and ending in the City were added to the project scope. Otherwise Phase II has the same service terms as Phase I: The pilot involves marketing of the pilot project by both parties. The pilot does not involve a taxi alternative, integrated trip planning or integrated payment options, or complementary paratransit, and does not require the TNC to provide WAVs. 2. Arlington County Transit Bureau (*): Arlington County, Virginia’s 10-year transit development plan recommends implementing by 2026 an On-demand Flex Service, consisting of four different zones, that will provide midday service to lower density areas in a more cost efficient manner. The on-demand flex zones will be associated primarily with peak hour only routes and will only provide trips to and from defined activity/transfer centers. Initially, this service will replace the midday service on one route and provide midday service on several other fixed routes. It will also involve integrated trip planning and payment options, and will include complementary paratransit service. However, as planned the project would not require the TNC to provide WAVs. 3. Centennial, CO (P; FMLM): For six-months, August 17, 2016 through February 17, 2017, the City of Centennial, Colorado and the Southeast Public Improvement Metropolitan District sponsored Go Centennial, a pilot that offered free Lyft Line rides to and from the Dry Creek Light Rail Station to people who lived or worked within the existing RTD Call-n-Ride service area (3.75 square miles). Lyft Line rides were available free of charge Monday-Friday, 5:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. Go Centennial was accessible by phone through the City’s Citizen Response Center and through the Go Denver and Lyft mobile applications (thus involving integrated trip planning, but not integrated payment). An accessible vehicle with a ramp and trained driver was

D-2 D-2 provided by Via to serve people with limited mobility. The Via vehicle could be taken point to point within the service area (trips did not have to start or end at light rail) and could be hailed through the Citizen Response Center or the Lyft app. The City paid Lyft and Via monthly for services provided the previous month. The project did not include a taxi alternative. The service did not require Lyft to provide WAVs.1 4. Cincinnati Metro (SORTA): This was a joint promotion in which SORTA provided in-kind promotion of the program through on-board interior transit advertising on its buses in exhange for a 20% discount for SORTA riders (new customers only). The program ran from March 1, 2016 to March 1, 2017; it was not considered a pilot. The program did not involve transfer of funds from SORTA to the TNC or vice versa. The program did not include a taxi alternative. It did not involve integrated trip planning, integrated payment options, or complementary paratransit, nor did it require the TNC to provide WAVs. 5. Dallas Area Transit (DART): DART has one ongoing project related to app integration, a Sandbox app integration pilot, and a completed pilot project using Uber for Business to provide on-call service. Initial app interface (IA): Within DART’s current GoPass℠ (mobile ticketing app), “Travel Tools” (the wayfinding section) includes “Connect 2 Car,” an interface to the apps for Lyft, Uber, and ZipCar. Passengers seeking a car connection can select the provider of their choice. Selecting one of those interfaces will connect the passenger to their app. The app interface does not include a taxi alternative, or integrated payment options. The app interface has been available to passengers since January 2016. Sandbox Mobility On-Demand (MOD) interface (P; X): DART received a $1.2M grant in October 2016 to participate in a technology-driven project through two DOT initiatives aimed at promoting the use of advanced technologies in transportation: the Advanced Transportation and Congestion Management Technologies Deployment program run by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and FTA’s MOD Sandbox program. DART’s Sandbox project will integrate ride-sharing services such as TNCs, microtransit, public on demand, carpooling, taxi and bike sharing into the GoPass mobile ticketing app. The project will create an integrated, multimodal application that leverages ride-sharing services, improve access to DART stations and deliver a “one-touch”, single payment transaction for customers through the app. The collaboration with various technology providers will offer transit riders an option to choose FMLM options based upon price, travel time and wait time for arrival of the service while potentially reducing the overwhelming dependency on the single occupant automobile within the North Texas Region. Additionally, the project will 1 However, the pilot was intended to test the viability of an alternative to RTD’s current FMLM service, the Call-n-Ride, which requires a subsidy of about $18.50 per one-way trip, requires advance sign-ups, and cannot respond to real-time demand. Centennial Innovation Team, Fehr & Peers, Go Centennial Final Report, June 2017, at 8, http://www.centennialco.gov/uploads/files/Government/Iteam/Go%20Centennial%20Final%20Report_for %20web.pdf.

D-3 D-3 provide equitable MOD options for the unbanked, disabled, low income, and smartphone challenged customers. DART’s Mobility on Demand pilot will be deployed beginning in the second quarter of FY 2018. On-call service (#; FMLM): DART provides an on-call service, which requires passengers to call at least an hour in advance to reserve a ride. https://www.dart.org/riding/dartoncall.asp Under a pilot project that ran from April of 2016 through May of 2017, DART signed on to “Uber for business” and recruited customers within two DART on-call zones. The objective of the test was to understand receptivity among customers, and the logistical ease of use for DART, to determine the feasibility of substituting this service for the existing DART on-call service. Uber for Business allowed DART to, in essence, be the business and the recruited persons to be part of DART’s business base. Customers would use this service on behalf of DART, DART would pay for these trips during the test. The test service did not involve complementary paratransit service, nor did it require the TNC to provide WAVs. 6. Denton County [TX] Transportation Authority (DCTA): DCTA has three projects, one involving a taxi company rather than a TNC, one involving Lyft, and one involving Uber. On-Demand Rideshare (Taxi): DCTA has entered into a contract with a major operator of taxi services in the Dallas-Fort Worth region for On-Demand Rideshare Services (ODRS) to be delivered in suburban areas where traditional fixed-route public transportation is not viable or available to be provided efficiently to customers. The taxi operator has a track record of operating supplemental mobility services in the area. The operator provides service via a taxi voucher program in the covered service area to qualified customers (over 65, have a certified disability, and are residents of the participating Collin County communities) who can receive a debit card for exclusive use on the operator’s fleet vehicles. The participating communities provide a 3 to 1 match for every dollar a program participant adds to the debit card. The debit cards can then be used to pay regular meter fares for trips within Collin County. Overall the service provided complementary paratransit again where there had previously been paratransit service, but it did not require the taxi operator to provide WAVs; DCTA vehicles provided that additional service. The contract began in June 2017 and was scheduled to run until June 2018; DCTA did not consider the program to be a pilot. The City of McKinney does anticipate using federal funds for service in its jurisdiction. On-Demand Rideshare (Lyft): DCTA also entered into a contract for ODRS with Lyft, which authorized Lyft to provide a variety of mobility services to DCTA on a task order basis over a two-year period beginning in late 2017. The specific program parameters (geographic location, time blocking, customer qualifications, subsidy amounts, program duration) will be outlined via individual task orders under that contract. The agreement does not require Lyft to provide WAVs. Uber Pilot (P; FMLM): DCTA’s pilot partnership program with Uber began in October 2016 and was scheduled to run through January 31, 2018. The program provided a $2 subsidy for each Uber ride that begins and ends within a designated zone. The project did not involve integrated trip planning or integrated payment

D-4 D-4 options. The service did not involve complementary paratransit or require the TNC to provide WAVs. It appears that this program was replaced in 2018 with a partnership with Lyft.2 [E-24] 7. Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority (RTA) (P; FMLM): The RTA Connect Pilot Mobility Partnership supported first and last mile opportunities and connected customers to existing transit services because of service alterations and/or reductions, replacing some previous fixed route service. The pilot period began in June 2017 and was scheduled to run until June 2019. As of October 2017, RTA had not charged customers for rides beginning and ending at designated stops or transit hubs, but under the pilot RTA reserved the right to begin charging customers up to $1.75, one way, for trips within that designated program area. Customers who did not complete trips within the designated program area were charged the full fare. Service was available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Customers had the choice to select from either of the available program providers (a taxi alternative was added to the project in August 2017). The pilot offered access through a call center (which allowed customers to request advance scheduled as well as on-demand rides) as well as via smart phone. Eligible customers were able to access the program's coupon code via marketing initiatives by RTA and participating transit providers. In addition, information on the pilot and discount codes were displayed at identified bus stops and transit hubs.3 The pilot involved integrated trip planning, but not integrated payment options or complementary paratransit service. As of October 2017, no WAVs had been requested. In the event of such requests RTA planned to deploy its own vehicles. 8. Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority (HART) (P; FMLM): HART’s HyperLINK was a fully ADA accessible service, including both integrated trip planning and integrated payment options. Rides could be booked by app or through a call center. Rides within the designated service zone cost $1 to connect to a designated HART stop or $3 to connect anywhere within the zone, with payment by cash or credit card. http://www.gohart.org/Pages/Hyperlink.aspx. Transdev operated the service, using 11 Transdev vehicles and four Teslas leased to HART. Drivers were Transdev employees. Between November 2016 and August 2017, the service had delivered around 10,000 trips. The pilot was scheduled to run through April 2018. 9. Kansas City Area Transportation Authority (KCATA)—KCATA had a microtransit pilot, and has an ongoing on-demand paratransit pilot, neither of which involves TNCs. Bridj Microtransit Pilot (P): The microtransit service was provided using the Bridj mobile platform, KCATA drivers, and vehicles KCATA secured from Ford. Bridj provided all technology support. The pilot did not involve a taxi alternative, 2 The Leader, DCTA Partners with Lyft to Offer $2 Discount in Highland Village and North Lewisville, Press Release, Jan. 16, 2018, http://starlocalmedia.com/theleader/news/dcta-partners-with-lyft-to-offer- discount-in-highland-village/article_a6841802-fafe-11e7-bb55-6fab08b86bad.html. [E-24] 3 Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority Board of Trustees, Finance/Personnel & Planning Committee Meeting Minutes, March 21, 2017, http://www.i-riderta.org/contentAsset/raw-data/796bacd0-4c6f-4010- 9fc3-ebc2bf274903/attachment

D-5 D-5 integrated trip planning, integrated payment options, or complementary paratransit service. The pilot did include WAVs. The pilot began in May 2016 and ended in February 2017. RideKC Freedom On-Demand (X): This program offers same-day curb-to-curb service for older adults and persons with disabilities. Service can be scheduled using the RideKC mobile application or by calling the RideKC Call Center to speak directly with dispatch. Each customer is allowed up to four (4) one-way trips per day. Service is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Taxis are delivering the services. http://ridekc.org/assets/uploads/documents/RKC_Ride_Guide.pdf . 10. King County Metro— King County Metro has planned various FMLM pilots and has an ongoing program to provide emergency rides home that utilizes TNC in part. On-Demand Pilot (P; FMLM; *): King County’s FMLM pilot aims to connect an office park and the adjacent residential area with the nearby public transit hubs. The pilot was designed to improve access to fixed route transit while minimizing the service’s impact on traffic congestion (thus concurrent TNC/ microtransit rather than sequential TNC service). The pilot would not involve integrated trip planning, or integrated payment options. Although the project was scheduled to begin in November 2016 and then run for three months, as of November 2017 the contract was still under negotiation. Emergency Ride Home (ERH) (X): The Redmond Real-Time Rideshare and the Community Connections Programs use Uber/Lyft as partial backup for the program.4 11. LA Metro: Several LA Metro initiatives related to RSPs—including FMLM TNC service with Via, a public microtransit service, a guaranteed ride home program, and an UberPool promotion—were planned, ongoing, or completed. MOD Sandbox Project (P; FMLM): This project—funded in part by a Sandbox grant—was scheduled to start in summer 2018 and continue for 12 months after launch. The project is intended to test using Via, operated as a TNC, as a FMLM solution to and from three pilot stations. The project will include the ability to utilize a call center to dispatch rides.5 The project did not include integrated trip planning, but did include integrated payment options and integrated paratransit service, and required the TNC to provide WAVs. (See infra, this Appendix at No. 20 Sound Transit). Microtransit (*; X): Metro is planning a microtransit service under a public-private partnership model. First Metro will work with a private partner to plan the service. If the decision is made to go ahead, the service will operate on a private partner’s mobility platform, with Metro providing labor for operations and routine vehicle maintenance. The private partner would also assist in marketing the service. The 4 Redmond Real Time Rideshare with iCarpool, https://www.goredmond.com/blog/january-3-2017- 849am/redmond-real-time-rideshare-icarpool . 5 Emma Huang, Metro pursuing a partnership with Via to offer shared rides to select transit stations, THE SOURCE, Nov. 17, 2017, http://thesource.metro.net/2017/11/17/metro-pursuing-a-partnership-with-via-to- offer-shared-rides-to-select-transit-stations/ (accessed Nov. 22, 2017).

D-6 D-6 program is planned to involve integrated payment, as well as other payment options. Guaranteed Ride Home (X): The regional Guaranteed Ride Home Program (GRH), https://www.metro.net/riding/rideshare/grh/, includes TNCs as one of the options for reimbursable transportation under GRH. UberPool Promotion (#; X): LA Metro had a two-week pilot offering a promotional discount for UberPool when the Expo Line Phase II opened. During the pilot Metro provided a $5 discount off any UberPool ride that began or ended at any of the new Expo Line stations.6 12. Livermore Amador Valley Transit Authority (LAVTA) (P; FMLM): The Go Dublin Pilot began in January 2017, with a scheduled end-date of December 2017, although as of November 2017 LAVTA was evaluating the pilot to consider whether to extend it into 2018 and whether to expand the service area. This service, which involved a partnership with Uber, Lyft, and DeSoto Cab, was intended to provide alternative service for a previous fixed route, and to provide FMLM service to the two BART stations in the LAVTA service area, where parking is often full by 7:30 AM. The pilot provided a discount of half fare up to $5 per shared trip (UberPool, Lyft Line, DeSoto Rideshare) taken in Dublin, available 24/7. The project did not involve integrated trip planning, integrated payment options, or complementary paratransit service. DeSoto Cab provided WAVs. The De Soto Cab option also allowed customers to call for a ride by phone and to pay cash. http://www.wheelsbus.com/godublin/ 13. Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA): MBTA has implemented a paratransit pilot and has issued an RFP for taxis to provide similar services. On-Demand Paratransit Pilot Program with Uber/Lyft (P): The project began October 1, 2016 and was scheduled to run until December 2017 (two months beyond the originally scheduled end date of October 1, 2017). The pilot provided on-demand paratransit service in addition to The RIDE, MBTA’s regular paratransit service, with booking via app for both TNCs, and bookings for Lyft also available by phone. RIDE customers were required to elect one of the two TNCs with which to register in order to participate in the pilot service. The pilot included integrated fare payment, but not integrated trip planning. Although the pilot required the TNCs to provide WAV service, it did not constitute complementary paratransit service, and did not provide assistance (including assistance in boarding vehicles) from the drivers. The registration interface allows customers to sign up in six languages in addition to English. https://www.mbta.com/accessibility/the-ride/on-demand-pilot Taxi Paratransit Service (P; X): On October 30, 2017, a contract was awarded to the technology company Verifone, Inc., which plans to use its Curb app, a new dispatch management platform, as well as a call-in concierge service, to allow RIDE customers to book or take rides on demand, with registered taxis inside The RIDE coverage area, including WAV Taxi service. During this pilot, the service will be opt-in, and will be service in addition to The RIDE. The system will also allow 6 Nolan Borgman, OEI wins $1.3 Million to expand the definition of transit access, THE SOURCE, Jan. 6, 2017, http://thesource.metro.net/2017/01/06/oei-wins-1-3-million-to-expand-the-definition-of-transit- access/ (accessed Mar. 7, 2017).

D-7 D-7 TRAC (The RIDE Accessibility Center), MBTA’s centralized call and dispatch center, to book, dispatch, and monitor trips under the platform. As of November 2017, Verifone was in the process of signing up drivers for this service. 14. Metra (Chicago): Metra has entered into a three-year advertising relationship with a TNC. The project began in March 2017. There are no additional requirements for the service, such as integrated trip planning, integrated payment options, or provision of WAVs. 15. North Carolina Department of Transportation—Rail Division (P): The pilot ran from October 2016 through December 2016. The program focused on allowing passengers to use the TransLoc app to help get to their final destination from any of the train stations between Raleigh and Charlotte. Passengers could use the app to see in real time where the bus was and could then determine whether to wait for the bus or request an Uber. As the pilot did not include any direct relationship between NCDOT and the TNCs, there were no additional requirements for the service, such as integrated trip planning, integrated payment options, or provision of WAVs . 16. Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA): PSTA has/has had three programs that involve TNCs. None of the programs involved integrated trip planning. All three programs included taxi alternatives and involved complementary paratransit, but only one required the TNC to provide WAVs. Only one program involved integrated payment options. Only one received federal funding. Direct Connect (FMLM): Direct Connect provides a $5 discount for Uber rides that begin or end at a designated PSTA bus stop and take place within the designated zone of service. Direct Connect began service in February 2016 and is ongoing. TD Late Shift (P): This pilot program provided on-demand trips at night to or from work to participants in the PSTA program for the transportation disadvantaged. The program included three service providers: Uber, a taxi company, and a wheelchair van provider. PSTA staff screened trip requests by telephone, scheduled trips, dispatched trips, and collected data on eligible trips using the Uber Central web- based platform. The TD Late Shift program began in July 2016 and was planned to run through June 30, 2018. MOD Sandbox (P; IA): Under this FTA-funded pilot Lyft was to provide door-to- door on-demand paratransit service, including WAVs. Other PSTA partners included a software company to deploy internal customer service dispatching software, a taxi company to provide ambulatory service, and a wheelchair van service to provide both ambulatory and WAV service. The project included an integrated payment option. A key goal of the project was to collect WAV usage data to attempt to predict how many WAVs are necessary to provide equivalent service. Although scheduled to begin in January 2017, as of October 2017 contract negotiations with Lyft were ongoing. The program was scheduled to run through March 2019. 17. Sacramento Regional Transit District (P): Sacramento had a FMLM pilot in 2016- 2017 that included TNCs and began a microtransit pilot in 2018. [E-25]

D-8 D-8 Station Link (P): provided $5 off Uber, Lyft, or Yellow Cab for rides to or from one of 6 specific light rail stations, good for 10 rides per customer, per service. The pilot, which ran from October 3, 2016 through March 31, 2017, received some federal funding (from Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement) and was also funded by a Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District Grant, with assistance from the Sacramento Area Council of Governments. The project did not involve complementary paratransit, integrated trip planning, or integrated payment options. However, the service did require the TNC to provide WAVs. SmaRT Ride (P): SmaRT Ride was a six-month microtransit pilot provided in the City of Citrus Heights. The on-demand service deployed small buses, operating with TransLoc’s dynamic routing software. The service was priced at $2.75/ride, the same fare as for the agency’s bus and light rail.7 18. San Diego Metropolitan Transit System (MTS): MTS ran a special event pilot and has plans to provide app integration. Special Event Pilot (P): MTS entered a marketing partnership with Uber to encourage ridesharing while Comic-Con and the Major League Baseball All-Star Game were taking place. The pilot ran from July 8, 2016 through July 24, 2016. During the promotional period MTS provided signage encouraging use of UberPool, designated pick up and drop off zones at specified Trolley Stations, allowed Uber specified branding and advertising opportunities, and provided marketing of UberPool as agreed upon. Uber provided first ride discounts for new and existing Uber users. This service was entirely supplemental and had no paratransit/WAVs components. It did not include either integrated trip planning or integrated payment options. App Integration (*; X): MTS also has plans to have its mobile ticketing provider integrate TNC options within the mobile ticketing app. 19. San Joaquin Regional Transit District (RTD) (P; FMLM): RTD GO! is a one-year pilot project (scheduled to run from July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018) deployed in sections of San Joaquin County where traditional fixed-route service typically underperforms, and has been reduced/eliminated. RTD GO! provides a 50% discount (up to $5.00/ride) on Uber rides that either: originate or end outside of the RTD service area; originate or end at one of nine select transit centers. The project also involves a taxi alternative. WAVs are available through an RTD contract with Journey Via Gurney. Individuals unable to use Uber due to physical disabilities or other limitations are able to request trips through the TransLoc OnDemand mobile application.8 The project did not involve integrated trip planning but did involve integrated payment options. The service did involve complementary paratransit and required the TNC to provide WAVs. 7 SacRT First to Bring Microtransit to the Sacramento Valley, Press Release, Jan. 26, 2018, http://www.masstransitmag.com/press_release/12394145/sacrt-first-to-bring-microtransit-to-the- sacramento-valley. 8 See also, Introducing RTD GO!, http://www.sjrtd.com/uber/.

D-9 D-9 20. Sound Transit: Sound Transit has two TNC relationships: a FMLM MOD pilot project, and a co-marketing project. MOD Sandbox (P; FMLM): Los Angeles County and the Central Puget Sound transit operators are partnering with Lyft to explore the viability and benefit of using TNC services to provide FMLM solutions for trips originating and ending at select regional transit stops. The project is funded by a MOD Sandbox grant. The planned project start and end dates were February 2017 and February 20, 2017, but as of October 2017 contract negotiations were still ongoing. The project does not involve integrated trip planning or integrated payment options. The service does involve complementary paratransit service, and it requires the TNC to provide WAVs. As of September 2017, Sound Transit was also in discussions with Via to provide service (ambulatory or WAVs) under this program. Co-Promotion of Uber Discounts (X): Sound Transit agreed to Uber’s request that the agency co-promote a pricing discount for Uber trips to/from Link light rail stations south of downtown Seattle. Uber will provide the funding for the discounts. Sound Transit will provide information to Sound Transit customers via free social media; Uber may buy paid media from Sound Transit’s ad sales agency. King County Metro and the City of Seattle have also asked to participate; the public partners may fund a survey of participants at the conclusion of the program, with Uber assisting in distribution. 21. Transportation Authority of Marin (TAM) (P; FMLM): TAM’s 6-month (or longer, depending on funding) pilot provides discounted rides via Lyft Line to and from any SMART train station in Marin County, during SMART hours of operation, Monday through Friday. TAM provided ADA services and ride scheduling for individuals without access to cell phones through a third-party contractor, Whistlestop, which services requested but did not require advance scheduling. The Lyft Line discount provided up to $5 off the fare once an initial $2 fare was reached. The program began on September 12, 2017.9 22. TriMet (P; IA): TriMet is extending its OpenTripPlanner (OTP) platform to incorporate additional mobility options, such as Lyft, Uber, car2go, and BIKETOWN into OTP so that riders can easily plan mixed‐mode trips. Some of the additional project elements will include development of a robust, open source geocoder; improvements to the basemap to support better walking and wheelchair trip plans; and a new, mobile‐friendly interface for OTP. One of the project goals is to develop an open source trip planning toolkit that can be implemented by other transit agencies. The project is funded by a MOB Sandbox grant.10 The planned project start and end dates were January 2017 and January 2019, respectively. 23. Valley Metro (Phoenix)(P; IA): This FTA-funded MOD pilot involved both trip planning and integrated payment options. The Valley Metro Mobility Platform was 9 TAM, Commute Options, Lyft Incentives, https://www.tam.ca.gov/projects-programs/commute-options/; Starting Tues, Sept.12! TAM Partners with Lyft and Whistlestop on “GETSMART17” a $5-discount for Lyft Line to/from SMART Stations in Marin, https://www.tam.ca.gov/tam-lyftline-tofrom-smart/. 10 About the MOD Sandbox Grant, https://trimet.org/mod/about_mod.htm; MOD Sandbox Grant 2017 ‐ 2019, https://trimet.org/mod/.

D-10 D-10 intended to build upon RidekickTM, Valley Metro’s existing mobile application, to enable users to receive real-time travel information, purchase tickets for both public and private transportation modes, and utilize an optimized trip planning service through the integration of non-Valley Metro operated services such as Uber, Lyft, GR:D Bike Share, and Zipcar. Users are able to create personalized accounts suitable to their needs and to track travel patterns, including travel or accessibility features for people with disabilities; use a single payment system for public/private transportation modes; and receive electronic discounts for local events such as basketball games, concerts, movie theaters, and restaurants. The application has open data platform design that allows other public transportation agencies to use the application, but to also adjust the features and functionality of the application to meet the needs and requirements for their respective service area and clients. 24. Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (Metro) (P): Metro launched the Abilities-Ride pilot program in September 2017. The program allows any MetroAccess-eligible customer to use on-demand taxi services at a discounted rate ($15 off the total fare after the first $5), for up to four trips (beginning and ending in Maryland) per day. The two designated providers are required to offer WAV service when requested. Reservations are not required, but “highly recommended.” http://www.abilities-ride.com Rides can be booked by phone, online, or using an app, although not through the MetroAccess portal.11 The pilot does not involve integrated trip planning or integrated payment options. The pilot itself is additional to Metro’s complementary paratransit service. 11 Faiz Siddiqui, Metro to launch ‘Abilities-Ride’ paratransit service this month, but Uber, Lyft won’t be giving the rides, WASH. POST, Sept. 5, 2017, https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/dr- gridlock/wp/2017/09/05/metro-to-launch-touted-abilities-ride-paratransit-service-later-this-month-but-uber- lyft-wont-be-giving-the-rides/?utm_term=.a7d2f28095d5 (accessed Oct. 22, 2017).

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TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Legal Research Digest 53: Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ridesourcing Service Providers explores the efforts made by public transit agencies to provide on-demand services to the public.

It also provides transit agencies with legal guidance for considering whether to enter into relationships with ridesourcing service providers (RSPs).

The report includes a description of ridesourcing services in the United States, state and municipal legislative and regulatory schemes, procurement and procurement processes, contractual and partnership provisions in agreements between RSPs and a public transit agency, issues of compliance with federal legislation and civil rights requirements and those under the Americans with Disabilities Act, legal claims and litigation, and risk management issues stemming from relationships between RSPs and transit agencies.

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