National Academies Press: OpenBook

Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop (2018)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers

« Previous: Appendix A: Agenda and List of Participants
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×

Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers

GRAHAM A. COLDITZ (NAM) (steering committee chair) is Neiss-Gain professor in the School of Medicine at Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL), where he also serves as chief of the Division of Public Health Sciences in the Department of Surgery and program director of the master of population health sciences degree program. He is the associate director of prevention and control at the Siteman Cancer Center and deputy director of the Institute for Public Health at WUSTL, where he holds leadership roles in education and fostering transdisciplinary research to address local and global public health challenges. His long-standing research focuses on causes and prevention of chronic diseases, and strategies to implement prevention based on what is already known.

JAMES ALLEN (steering committee) is professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Biobehavioral Health, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth. He is also a licensed psychologist with interests in individual and family therapy. His current work focuses on multilevel community intervention promotion for American Indian/Alaska Native and rural community health. He received a Fulbright lecturer/research fellowship in 2003 and the Martin Mayman award for distinguished contribution to personality assessment. He currently teaches medical students in the areas of cultural competency training, population health, integration with behavioral health, and rural health.

ELLEN CROMLEY (steering committee) was professor of geography at the University of Connecticut, adjunct professor in the Department of Com-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×

munity Medicine and Health Care in the university’s School of Medicine, and guest professor in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at Lund University in Sweden. Her research interests include geographic patterns of health and disease, location of health services and geographic factors affecting their utilization, and mapping and spatial analysis of health data.

ROBERT T. CROYLE is director of the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the National Institutes of Health. Before coming to NCI, he was professor of psychology and a member of the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. His research has examined how individuals process, evaluate, and respond to cancer risk information.

KELLY J. DEVERS is senior fellow in the Health Care Department at NORC at the University of Chicago. She is a widely recognized expert in health services and policy research with particular expertise in alternative payment models, delivery system reforms, and their impacts on access, cost, and quality. She has conducted evaluations of bundled and episode-based payment initiatives and published on topics such as accountable care organizations, patient-centered medical homes, electronic health records (EHRs) and other electronic health data, care coordination and management, and quality improvement. Devers is also a nationally recognized expert in mixed methods and qualitative research and evaluation, including a new method called qualitative comparative analysis.

MARC ELLIOTT is senior principal researcher at RAND and holds its distinguished chair in statistics. His areas of interest include health disparities, Medicare, vulnerable populations, health care experiences, profiling of health care institutions, survey sampling, experimental design, casual inference, and case-mix adjustment in U.S. and UK applications. He has developed Bayesian methods of estimating race/ethnicity and associated disparities using surname and address information. He led Office of Minority Health work developing novel, cost-effective sampling and analytic methods to improve national health estimates for small racial/ethnic subgroups. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the first recipient of its Mid-Career Award (Health Policy Section).

CHRIS FOWLER is assistant professor of geography at Pennsylvania State University. His research interests are in urban and economic geography, demographics, poverty, planning and economic development policies, spatial statistics, and complex economics systems. His current work focuses on methods for representing neighborhood change in complex, multiscalar

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×

contexts and developing a line of research that explores the increasing neighborhood-scale diversity in U.S. cities. He is particularly interested in blending complex, interview-based research on neighborhoods with innovative quantitative methods of spatial analysis.

KRISTA GILE is associate professor of mathematics and statistics at the University of Massachusetts. Her research focuses on developing statistical methodology for social and behavioral science research, particularly related to making inference from partially observed social network structures. Most of her current work is focused on understanding the strengths and limitations of data sampled with link-tracing designs such as snowball sampling, contact tracing, and respondent-driven sampling.

SCARLETT LIN GOMEZ is professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and a member of the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of California, San Francisco. She is also a research scientist at the Cancer Prevention Institute of California, where she is the director of the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry, a participant in the NCI SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) Program, and the California Cancer Registry. Her research focuses primarily on cancer health disparities and aims to understand the multilevel drivers of those disparities.

BRIAN HARRIS-KOJETIN is director of the Committee on National Statistics. He comes from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), where he served as senior statistician in the Statistical and Science Policy Office. He chaired the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology and was the lead at OMB on issues related to standards for statistical surveys, survey nonresponse, survey respondent incentives, and the Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act of 2002. Prior to joining OMB in 2001, he was senior project leader of Research Standards and Practices at the Arbitron Company. He also previously served as a research psychologist in the Office of Survey Methods Research in the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

RICK H. HOYLE is professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University, where he directs the Center for the Study of Adolescent Risk and Resilience, a National Institute on Drug Abuse Center of Excellence. He is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and the American Psychological Association. His research interests include personality processes, behavior change, measurement, and structural equation modeling.

GRAHAM KALTON (steering committee) is senior vice president and chairman of the board at Westat and research professor in the Joint Pro-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×

gram of Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. Prior to working at Westat, he was a research scientist in the Survey Research Center of the University of Michigan, where he also served a term as chairman of the Department of Biostatistics. Earlier, he was on the faculty of the University of Southampton and the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is a recognized leader in survey methodology and statistical sampling.

AMY KILBOURNE is professor of psychiatry at the University of Michigan Medical School and director of the Department of Veterans Affairs Quality Enhancement Research Initiative. Her goal is to improve outcomes for people with mental disorders through research that accelerates the implementation of effective practices into real-world settings. She is a national expert in implementation science, mental health services, and academic-community research partnerships.

HOWARD K. KOH is the Harvey V. Fineberg professor of the practice of public health leadership at the Harvard School of Public Health and the Harvard Kennedy School. He previously served as the 14th assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services (2009-2014) after being nominated by President Barack Obama, and as commissioner of public health for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (1997-2003) after being appointed by Governor William Weld.

DIANE KORNGIEBEL is assistant professor in biomedical health informatics and an adjunct assistant professor in bioethics and humanities at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, where she works at the intersection of bioethics, informatics, and the delivery of health care innovation. She brings her expertise in mixed methods research, bioethics, and user-centered design to developing innovative, people-informed interventions—using collaborative approaches—that improve health while addressing issues of accessibility, acceptability, inclusivity, and equity.

SUNGHEE LEE is associate research scientist at the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan. Before joining ISR, she was at the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and Biostatistics. Her research interest includes sampling and measurement issues in data collection with rare population subgroups, such as racial, ethnic, linguistic, and sexual minorities, and cross-cultural survey methodology.

THOMAS A. LOUIS is emeritus professor of biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research interests include Bayesian methods, clinical and field studies, health services research, environmental risk assessment, genomics, and survey methods. He is an elected

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×

member of the International Statistical Institute and a fellow of the American Statistical Association, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Institute of Mathematical Statistics. He is also a national associate of the National Research Council.

CHRISTINE LU is an associate professor in the Department of Population Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, and she co-directs the PRecisiOn Medicine Translational Research (PROMoTeR) Center. She is a pharmacist, health policy scientist, and pharmacoepidemiologist. Her program of research focuses on the policy, legal, ethical, economic, and societal issues of precision medicine. She has contributed substantially to evaluations of health policies in developing and developed countries using large, longitudinal administrative health care data and rigorous quasi-experimental research methods.

KATHERINE R. McLAUGHLIN is assistant professor in the Department of Statistics at Oregon State University. Her recent research was a rational-choice preferential recruitment model for respondent-driven sampling. This work involved collaborations with members of the Hard-to-Reach Population Methods Research Group and the World Health Organization to develop new statistical methodology geared toward improved estimation for hidden populations, including those at high risk for HIV/AIDS. Her research interests include survey sampling methodology, social network analysis, network sampling, and social science applications of statistics.

KATHI MOONEY is distinguished professor and holds an endowed chair in the College of Nursing at the University of Utah. She is the co-leader of the Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program at the Huntsman Cancer Institute. Her program of research is focused on patient-reported outcomes, the improvement of cancer symptom outcomes, and cancer family caregiver research. She has demonstrated the efficacy of an automated telehealth system in improving both patient and family caregiver outcomes.

TRACY L. ONEGA is associate professor of epidemiology in the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College. Her major interests in cancer control center on access to cancer care, including screening, treatment, and surveillance; how where care is received influences treatment and outcomes; and how early intervention affects patients’ health and health care experiences. She has a special interest in how cancer care resources are allocated across populations and how variations thereof impact cancer patients. Her research program is largely built around her expertise in using registry and claims data to address these lines of inquiry.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×

JANICE C. PROBST (steering committee) is professor in the Department of Health Services Policy and Management and director of the South Carolina Rural Health Research Center at the Arnold School of Public Health of the University of South Carolina. In 2000, she contributed to the establishment of the South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, which represents a multiyear effort examining health disparities among poor and minority rural populations. She has extensive experience in health services research with an emphasis on rural and vulnerable populations.

F. DOUGLAS SCUTCHFIELD was the initial incumbent in the Peter P. Bosomworth Professorship in Health Services Research and Policy at the University of Kentucky and is now professor emeritus. He holds an MD degree from the University of Kentucky. Prior to his academic career, he practiced in rural Appalachia. He holds fellowships in the American College of Preventive Medicine and the American Academy of Family Practice. He was one of the founders of the College of Community Health Science at the University of Alabama and founded the Graduate School of Public Health at San Diego State University. He also founded the School, now College, of Public Health at the University of Kentucky and its Center for Health Services Research and Center for Public Health Services and Systems Research. His current research focuses on community health, public health organization and delivery, Appalachia health, and democracy in health care decision making.

LISA SIGNORELLO is acting director and acting chief of the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program Branch in NCI’s Division of Cancer Prevention. She came to NCI after having held academic positions at the Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, and Vanderbilt University, as well as having had significant private-sector research experience. Her research is broadly focused on issues related to the macro- and individual-level factors that give rise to socioeconomic and racial disparities in cancer incidence and survival.

PATRICK SULLIVAN is professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University. He has worked on HIV testing programs with migrant farm workers, with the inclusion of Hispanic participants in online sexual health surveys, and has investigated methods to increase participation of African American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) in his research. He has also worked with MSM prevention and vaccine studies in Peru and Brazil.

VETTA SANDERS THOMPSON is professor at WUSTL in the George Warren Brown School of Social Work and the Public Health Program. Her

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×

research focuses on racial and ethnic disparities in health and well-being, particularly among African Americans. She is a noted researcher in the areas of racial identity, psychosocial implications of race and ethnicity in health behavior and access to health services, and determinants of health and mental health disparities. Her work combines a social science understanding of racial identity, rigorous measurement, and community-based participatory research. Her goal is to empower members of the community to improve their health and well-being.

PATRICK H. TOLAN is the Charles S. Robb Professor of Education at the University of Virginia in the Curry School of Education and in the Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences in the School of Medicine. Over the past 35 years, he has organized and led multiple longitudinal and randomized control studies focused on prevention of problem behavior and academic and social failure and promoting resilience and effective functioning among youth in high-risk communities or at critical developmental transitions. His studies have provided insights and innovation in how multiple systems of influence converge to affect developmental course and provide opportunities for promoting positive outcome, understanding of various forms of violence and their interrelation, how families can manage stress, what schools can do to improve child social and emotional development, and how robust scientific methods can be integrated into community-based efforts and collaborations.

LANCE A. WALLER (steering committee) is Rollins Professor and chair of the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics in the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. His research involves the development and application of statistical methods for spatially referenced data, including applications in environmental justice, neurology, epidemiology, disease surveillance, conservation biology, and disease ecology. He is interested in both the statistical methodology and the environmental and epidemiologic models involved in the analysis of this type of data.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×
Page 129
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×
Page 130
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×
Page 131
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×
Page 132
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×
Page 133
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×
Page 134
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×
Page 135
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25112.
×
Page 136
Next: Committee on National Statistics »
Improving Health Research on Small Populations: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $48.00 Buy Ebook | $38.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The increasing diversity of population of the United States presents many challenges to conducting health research that is representative and informative. Dispersion and accessibility issues can increase logistical costs; populations for which it is difficult to obtain adequate sample size are also likely to be expensive to study. Hence, even if it is technically feasible to study a small population, it may not be easy to obtain the funding to do so. In order to address the issues associated with improving health research of small populations, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop in January 2018. Participants considered ways of addressing the challenges of conducting epidemiological studies or intervention research with small population groups, including alternative study designs, innovative methodologies for data collection, and innovative statistical techniques for analysis.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!