National Academies Press: OpenBook

Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop (2018)

Chapter: Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
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Appendix D

Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters

Michael Bamberg (Presenter) is professor of psychology, cultural studies and communication, and English at Clark University. He has contributed varied strands to developmental psychology, applied linguistics, and identity theory. At Clark, he has been instrumental in advancing undergraduate and graduate training in qualitative research. He also has been heavily involved in the establishment of the Society for Qualitative Inquiry in Psychology within the American Psychological Association. He is nationally and internationally known for teaching workshops on qualitative methods and narrative analysis and recently held an appointment as Yunshan Chair professor at the Guangdong University of Foreign Studies. As a develop-mentalist, Dr. Bamberg investigates identity formation processes as processes situated in context and in interaction. He is particularly interested in the question of student and teacher identity, in the role of narrative in organizational/institutional identity formation processes, and in the concept of “branding.” He received a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Sujeeta Bhatt (Study Director) is a senior program officer with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and study director for the Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security. She was formerly a research scientist at the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and was detailed to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s High-Value Detainee Interrogation Group (HIG). Prior to that, she was an assistant professor in the Department of Radiology at the Georgetown University Medical Center on detail to DIA/HIG. Her work at DIA

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×

and HIG entailed identifying knowledge gaps and developing and managing research projects to address those gaps. Her work in the Intelligence Community focused on the psychological and neuroscience bases for credibility assessment, biometrics, insider threat, intelligence interviewing and interrogation methods, and the development of research-to-practice modules on interrogation-related topics to promote the use of evidence-based practice in interviews/interrogations. She holds a Ph.D. in behavioral neuroscience from American University.

Pauline Cheong (Presenter) is professor at the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication, Arizona State University (ASU). She studies the complex interactions between communication technologies and different cultural communities around the world. Her recent grant-funded projects related to changing knowledge, authority, and leadership practices have examined how clergy and teachers maintain the interest of their students and congregations when the use of mobile and social media is so prevalent. Another of her interests is how religious groups use technology to interact and form local and global communities. She has investigated how communication technologies facilitate and constrain relations within cyber-vigilante groups and rumor-mongers in contested narrative landscapes, as well as how underserved and youth populations experience multiple digital divides. Dr. Cheong has published more than 80 articles and books and has received research awards from the National Communication Association, Western Communication Association, and International Communication Association. She serves on national and international boards and committees and has chaired doctoral colloquiums. At ASU’s Center for Asian Research, she is co-director of @AsiaMediated, funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Dr. Cheong received an M.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of Southern California.

Sara Cobb (Steering Committee) is a professor at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (S-CAR) at George Mason University, where she was also the director for 8 years. She teaches and conducts research on the relationship between narrative and violent conflict. She is also director of the Center for the Study of Narrative and Conflict Resolution at S-CAR, which provides a hub for scholarship on narrative approaches to conflict analysis and resolution. Formerly, she was director of the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School, and she has held positions at a variety of tier-one research institutions. She has also consulted to and/or conducted training for a host of public and private organizations. Dr. Cobb is widely published. She has been a leader in the fields of negotiation and conflict resolution, conducting research on the practice of neutrality, as well as the production of “turning points” and “critical moments” in negotiation

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×

processes. Some of this research is based on case studies from her field research in Guatemala, Chile, Rwanda, and the Netherlands. The blend of academic research, program development, and practice enables her to develop research projects that can yield practical understanding and generate effective interventions. She received a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Michael Dahlstrom is associate director of the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication and an associate professor at Iowa State University. His research focuses on the effects of narratives on perceptions of science. He is co-editor of an upcoming edited volume focusing on the often overlooked ethical challenges underlying science communication. He is also a past head of the Communicating Science, Health, Environment and Risk Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, and received the Shakeshaft Master Teaching Award in 2013. He earned an M.S. in biophysics from Iowa State University and a joint Ph.D. in journalism and mass communication and environmental resources from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Betty Sue Flowers (Steering Committee) is former director of the LBJ Presidential Library and Museum and former Kelleher professor of English and member of the Distinguished Teachers Academy at the University of Texas, Austin, as well as distinguished alumnus. She is also a poet, editor, and business consultant. She has served as a moderator for executive seminars at the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies; a consultant for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration; a visiting advisor to the secretary of the Navy; public director of the American Institute of Architects; and editor for Shell International in London, the Organization of American States, and the World Business Council in Geneva. Dr. Flowers received a B.A. and an M.A. from the University of Texas, Austin, and a Ph.D. from the University of London.

Roberto Franzosi (Presenter) is professor of sociology and linguistics at Emory University. His main substantive interest has been in social protest, with projects on Italian strikes, on the rise of Italian fascism (1919–1922), and on racial violence in Georgia (1875–1930). He has had a long-standing methodological interest in issues of language and measurement of meaning in texts. He is currently working on automatic computational linguistics approaches to the extraction of social actors and their actions from narrative texts (SVO, or Subject-Verb-Object) and automatic ways of visualizing the shape of stories. Dr. Franzosi received a B.A. in literature from the University of Genoa and a Ph.D. in sociology from Johns Hopkins University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×

Jeffrey Johnson (Steering Committee) is a professor of anthropology at the University of Florida. He is also an adjunct professor in the Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Mellon University. He was director of the Summer Institute for Research Design in Cultural Anthropology from 1996 to 2015. He is a former program manager with the Army Research Office (IPA), where he started the basic science research program in the social sciences. He has conducted extensive long-term research comparing group dynamics and the evolution of social networks among overwintering crews at the American South Pole Station and at the Polish, Russian, Chinese, and Indian Antarctic stations. Using these isolated human group settings as space analogs, he is currently studying aspects of team cognition relative to mission success. He has served as editor, co-editor, or associate editor of several journals. He received his Ph.D. in social science from the University of California, Irvine.

Josh Kerbel (Presenter) is a member of the research faculty at the National Intelligence University (NIU). His primary research focus at NIU is the future of intelligence analysis, especially how the Intelligence Community (IC) can better anticipate the emergent dynamics spawned by an increasingly complex security environment. More specifically, he explores the disruptive innovations demanded of the IC by a security environment that is fundamentally different from the Cold War environment that still profoundly—and problematically—shapes its legacy mindsets, processes, and habits. Prior to joining NIU, Mr. Kerbel held senior analytically focused positions in the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the U.S. Navy, the Central Intelligence Agency, and the Office of Naval Intelligence. He holds degrees from the George Washington University and the London School of Economics, as well as professional certifications from the Naval War College and the Naval Postgraduate School. He was also a postgraduate (Seminar XXI) fellow in the Center for International Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Debra Louison Lavoy (Presenter) is a marketing executive who has been studying narrative explicitly since 2010. She holds a degree in computer science and neurobiology from McGill University and spent the first decade of her career as a software engineer in research and commercial settings. Her narrative research grew out of roles at complex technology companies that struggled to explain the capabilities of their technology and why it mattered. Two years ago, she founded a boutique consulting firm, Narrative Builders, whose clients include a wide range of B2B, B2C, and nongovernmental organizations that now have well-developed and well-deployed organizational narratives that win investment and market share and build exceptional teams.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×

David Matsumoto (Steering Committee) is a professor of social psychology at San Francisco State University and director of the Culture and Emotion Research Lab, which focuses on studies involving culture, emotion, social interaction, and communication. He is well known for his work in the field of microexpressions, facial expression, gesture, and nonverbal behavior. He has served as editor-in-chief, editor, or editorial board member for several journals. He holds a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Carmen Medina (Steering Committee Chair) is the founder of MedinAnalytics, LLC, which provides analytic services on national security issues, cognitive diversity, global trends, and intrapreneurship. From 2005 to 2007, she was part of the executive team that led the Central Intelligence Agency’s (CIA’s) Analysis Directorate. In her last assignment before retiring, she oversaw the CIA’s Lessons Learned program and led the agency’s first effort to address the challenges posed by social networks, digital ubiquity, and the emerging culture of collaboration. She was a leader on diversity issues at the CIA, serving on equity boards at all organizational levels and across directorates. She was the first CIA executive to conceptualize many information technology applications now used by analysts, including online production, collaborative tools, and Intellipedia. Upon her retirement from the CIA, she received the Distinguished Career Intelligence Medal. From 2011 to 2015, she was a member of Deloitte Federal Consulting, where she served as senior advisor and mentor to Deloitte’s flagship innovation program, GovLab. She holds a B.A. in comparative government from the Catholic University of America.

William “Bruno” Millonig (Presenter) is Acting Director of National Intelligence for Science and Technology in the Office of the Assistant Director for Acquisition, Technology and Facilities at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Appointed in November 2017, Mr. Millonig is responsible for guiding the Intelligence Community’s (IC’s) scientific and technological integration through effective strategies, policies, and programs that ultimately allow the IC to close intelligence gaps. Prior to this position, he oversaw the Defense Intelligence Agency headquarters’ research and development, technical collection, and analytic responsibilities in support of the nation’s space and counterspace situational awareness. He also served as chief, National Measurement and Signature Intelligence (MASINT) Office, and chairman, National MASINT Committee. A command pilot with more than 4,800 flight hours, he retired from the U.S. Air Force in 2009 as director of strategic planning for homeland defense and counterterrorism issues. He is a Distinguished Flying Cross recipient, was commander of the U.S. Air Force’s training squadron of the year (2004), and holds numer-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×

ous team and individual awards. He graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy with a B.S. in engineering and earned master’s degrees in aviation operations and management from Embry Riddle University and in strategic studies from the U.S. Army War College.

Karen Monaghan (Presenter) is a former senior federal executive with the Intelligence Community. She retired in 2017 after 32 years of service, largely at the Central Intelligence Agency. She is known for being a strategic thinker and writer with broad multidisciplinary and geographic knowledge and experience analyzing economic and political developments in Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America.

James Pennebaker (Presenter) is Regents professor of psychology and executive director of a university-wide educational initiative called Project 2021 at the University of Texas, Austin. His earliest work examined the psychology of physical symptoms. That research ultimately led to his discovery of expressive writing—that writing about emotional upheavals improves physical health and immune function. More recent studies have explored natural language. Dr. Pennebaker’s research has revealed that everyday word use is related to personality, deception, status, group dynamics, and emotional states. He is now working with his university’s senior administration to rethink 21st-century education models. He has received several university and international awards for his research and teaching.

James Phelan (Presenter) is distinguished university professor of English at Ohio State University and the recipient of numerous prizes and grants, including an honorary doctorate from Aarhus University in 2013. He has also taught at the University of Toronto, Colorado College, and Norway’s Centre for Advanced Study in Oslo. In 2013, the International Society for the Study of Narrative named its annual award for best essay in Narrative the James Phelan Prize. Dr. Phelan is one of the founding members of Project Narrative at Ohio State, a unit recognized internationally as the premier center for research and teaching in narrative theory. His writings develop and deploy a rhetorical theory of narrative, one rooted in the principle that storytelling is an action in which one or more tellers recount events for one or more audiences to fulfill some particular purposes. He received an M.A. and a Ph.D. in English language and literature from the University of Chicago.

Doug Randall (Steering Committee) is founder and CEO of Protagonist, a high-growth narrative analytics company. Protagonist mines beliefs in order to energize brands, win narrative battles, and understand target audiences.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×

It uses natural language processing, machine learning, and deep human expertise to identify, measure, and shape narratives. The Protagonist platform was built on 10 years of narrative science that was initially developed to improve the American brand around the world for the U.S. government. Today, it is used by dozens of the world’s leading chief marketing officers, business leaders, and foundations. Mr. Randall has lectured on a number of topics at the Wharton School, Stanford University, and the National Defense University. He was previously a partner at Monitor, founder of Monitor 360, and co-head of the consulting practice at Global Business Network. Before that, he was a vice president at Snapfish, a senior consultant at Decision Strategies, Inc., and a senior research fellow at the Wharton School. Mr. Randall received a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.B.A. from the Wharton School.

Paul Sackett (Decadal Survey Chair) is the Beverly and Richard Fink distinguished professor of psychology and liberal arts at the University of Minnesota. His research interests revolve around various aspects of testing and assessment in workplace, educational, and military settings. He has served as president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, as co-chair of the committee producing the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, as a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Testing and Assessment, as chair of the American Psychological Association’s (APA’s) Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessments, and as chair of APA’s Board of Scientific Affairs. He holds a Ph.D. in industrial/organizational psychology from Ohio State University.

Catherine Tejeda (Presenter) is founder and CEO of Parenthetic, a small business that aims to bring more science to the art of influence. Parenthetic grew from her passion for developing techniques and technologies to tackle difficult challenges with global impact. She has more than a decade of experience studying and analyzing behavior across cultures, as well as methods for understanding and influencing attitudes and behaviors. She has worked at every stage of the communication development cycle: strategy and design; audience, competitor, and communication landscape analysis; message content creation, distribution, and assessment; and quantifying of campaign effects. She has worked across the public and private sectors on projects spanning counterproliferation, election monitoring, domestic and foreign extremism, health care and health crises, product and market forecasting, and luxury product sales. At Parenthetic, she leads teams for public- and private-sector clients focused on creating replicable processes for influencing individuals and populations measurably and more effectively. She ap-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×

plies expertise to advance the way people develop, discover, isolate, and measure the effect of influence campaigns.

Mark Turner (Presenter) is founding director of the Cognitive Science Network and co-director of the Red Hen Lab. He has received the Anneliese Maier Research Prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Prix du Rayonnement de la Langue et de la Litérature Françaises from the French Academy. He is founding president of the Myrifield Institute for Cognition and the Arts. He is a fellow of the Institute for Advanced Study, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the National Humanities Center, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the Institute of Advanced Study at Durham University, the Centre for Advanced Study at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, the New England Institute for Cognitive Science and Evolutionary Psychology, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute for the Science of Origins. He is also an extraordinary member of the Humanwissenschaftliches Zentrum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitätm, an external research professor of the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study, and a distinguished visiting professor at Hunan Normal University.

Michael Young (Presenter) is a professor in the School of Computing and deputy director of the Entertainment Arts and Engineering Program at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, where he directs the Liquid Narrative research group. He works to develop computational models of interactive narrative with applications to computer games, educational and training systems, and intelligence analysis. His work is grounded in computational approaches, but he seeks to cross disciplinary boundaries, involving collaborators and concepts from cognitive psychology, linguistics, narrative theory, cinematography, and other disciplines in which human cognition and interaction are central. He is an Association for Computing Machinery distinguished scientist and a senior member of both the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. In 2017, he was elected to the inaugural class of Higher Education Video Game Alliance fellows.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×
Page 53
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×
Page 54
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×
Page 57
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×
Page 58
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding Narratives for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25119.
×
Page 60
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Beginning in October 2017, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine organized a set of workshops designed to gather information for the Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security. The sixth workshop focused on understanding narratives for national security purposes, and this publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from this workshop.

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