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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
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C

Gallery Walk Questions and Input

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS IN THE GALLERY WALK COMMENTS

ACO accountable care organization
CHNA Community Health Needs Assessments
CMMI Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation
ECE early childhood education
EMR electronic medical record
FOA Funding Opportunity Announcement
IRS Internal Revenue Service
MACRA Medicare Access and CHIP [Children’s Health Insurance Program] Reauthorization Act of 2015
MCH maternal and child health
MIPS merit-based incentive payments system
National Academies National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
NYC New York City
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
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OB obstetrician
PED pediatrician
ROI return on investment

Topic 1: Evidence

  1. How can the field better apply what is known at the interface of ECE and health (e.g., screening for developmental milestones)?
    • Monthly happy birthday–type materials sent to families with information on milestones and low- to no-cost ways to help child develop.
    • Better data collection in child care, better use of data to target resources to underserved populations.
    • Business leaders and health administrator awareness and commitment to investments and ROI of ECE.
    • Create community demand.
    • Public awareness for all community sectors is critical.
    • Discharge moms/babies from hospitals with materials that promote talking/singing to infants.
    • Create health teams that include personnel trained in developmental screening and deploy community health workers to do home visits regarding books/songs at home.
    • Define a lean/minimal set of outcome measures at key milestones.
    • Focus on concrete, doable actions at each level and with community, state, and regional leaders to share messages and lessons learned and why it matters—so what? What’s in it for me?
    • Share those effective cross-sector partnerships that are sustainable.
    • Compatible software systems that enable more providers to access records and ability to share information.
    • Consider social genome1 indicators in longitudinal follow-up.
    • Shift the dialogue to assure promotion of developmental health and healthy relationships (primary prevention).
    • Important to have awareness of predictive risk for developmental delays (e.g., income, adverse childhood experiences) and ensure services (parent support, home visiting, early literacy, implemented at population level).
    • How does ECE fit into the logic model leading to longer, better quality of life and better distribution (more equitable) of those outcomes in the population?

___________________

1 See http://www.social-genome.org (accessed May 15, 2018).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
  • More support of systems-level integration of ECE into pediatric settings.
  • Don’t be fixated on obesity as a “health” outcome. Social, emotional, mental health, and academic outcomes are a pathway for better lifetime health broadly conceived (as opposed to one narrow outcome).
  • Promote more exemplars—tell the story with more than stats.
  • How can the power of health care advance the goals of ECE—which will improve health?
  • How to connect this work to third-grade reading and other initiatives (e.g., social-emotional learning in schools and community) for support longitudinally.
  • Familial screening regarding social, psychological, and behavioral factors that influence education and health, and the collection of screening findings in EMR.
  • Necessity of creating a shared language across public health, medical field, and education fields to talk about shared desirable outcomes.
  • Remember opportunity for bidirectional connections between ECE and pediatric care (e.g., ECE as setting to advance health).
  • Health care (pediatrics) as a platform for promoting child development.
  • Look to local level for solutions.
  • Top down doesn’t work.
  • It is in the details that the solutions are found.
  • De-jargoning terms, creating better engagement for providers in professional development, language access, cultural norms, opportunities/time for professional development.
  • Invest in consultant models in child care (mental health, child care, health consultants).
  • We have to talk about financing more!
  • We know many things to be done; we need to prioritize funding and work with policy makers on creative options (e.g., social impact bonds).
  • Screening and referral and follow-up to ensure service delivery is available for early childhood medical homes.
  • Need examples of best practices that go step by step—funding sources, partners, how to make evidence actionable.
  • Using/encouraging longitudinal data systems that integrate health and education data to identify which best practices are most scalable and for whom these practices work best.
  • Funding could be attached to partnering across disciplines to look for innovations.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
    • Bi-directional communication.
    • Not only data, but terminology and goals.
  1. What are the gaps and white spaces that need to be prioritized?
    • How to develop an infrastructure of trainers and coaches to deliver evidence-based training to care providers from birth to age 3.
    • Funding.
    • Family-based child care, systemic support, training and learning collaboratives for this group.
    • Raising salaries and ECE training/professional education for providers.
    • How the relationships between parenting and child outcomes vary by culture.
    • Need more evidence on quality-improvement approach in ECE integration work.
    • Impact of the health, safety, and well-being of ECE personal on ECE outcomes.
    • How to reach the informal day care providers, early childhood care given in their homes.
    • How does the Head Start experience fit?
    • Need to consider the social environmental facts that impact the well-being of children.
    • Child poverty is a factor—how is the ECE sector engaging to address the issue for families?
    • Effective communication with families and teachers and health care providers. How is information shared with parents? Are parents able to reinforce learning and advocate for their child’s needs? How do non-regular work schedules for parent’s impact ability to connect with/communicate with providers?
    • What is the relative balance of inputs to child development outcomes: word gap, nutrition, parent education, etc., and the relative investment benchmark of each (i.e., per capita $)?
    • Family violence prevention and healthy relationships.
    • How do you get this type of thinking infusion in higher education for the next generation of professionals?
    • Child outcomes with disparity breakouts.
    • Are optimal ECE programs including trauma-informed care?
    • What efforts are under way to address the “hand-off” process from early childhood to future life-stage work?
    • Who is an ECE provider? Is a home visitor? Is an early intervention provider?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
  • Research and evidence-based programs are emerging that create the opportunity to take them to scale; the challenge that we face is to honor diversity, family income, and rural versus urban settings.
  • Do public awareness campaigns around the word gap work? What is the evidence?
  • Addressing the social determinants of health of children and families.
  • Providing a full assessment to ensure children/families are getting the appropriate services.
  • We have better common understanding that outcomes are much more than reading and math. How do we convey this better, more widely, across sectors?
  • How to identify children who are beginning to show language delays before they are officially eligible for early intervention services (Part C).
  • Bridge between academic and education systems.
  • Gain clarity that sectors that touch families in first 1,000 days—home visiting, parent support, early intervention, primary care (OB/PED)—are clearly defined as part of early care system.
  • Is there policy agreement on child development outcomes . . . overall and at each age stage?
  • Collaboration—how do you support local collaboration, [it is] not in the budgets of the different stakeholders.
  • How best should these diverse approaches be synthesized or jointly implemented to minimize redundancy and maximize impact?
  • Support for infrastructure that promotes collaboration: shared metrics, time for providers, leaders, and parents to align and coordinate toward shared vision.
  • Common language between health professionals and ECE professionals.
  • Understand and use what already exists for national competencies that have positive results. Don’t reinvent the wheel. There is too much to do and we need implementation focus.
  • We need to help educate parents about the importance of early years.
  • Parents need support and education on child development.
  • How to get pediatric providers and ECE providers to share and work together, not just side by side.
  • Hospitals engagement in primary preventions supporting all parents in healthy child development.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
    • What is preventing school districts from investing in high-quality perks? Funding is an obvious challenge, but there are other known barriers for school districts. And how can these be addressed?
    • Create partnerships with parents instead of a one-way knowledge relationship where trainers know everything and parents don’t.
    • What are the factors that led to scale (25 percent penetration) in “reach out and read,” replication?
    • How do we sustain efforts, beyond funding? Define this better.
    • How do you connect the various health and ECE initiatives in communities? For example, ParentCorps and its three tiers is impressive—what else is going on in NYC and can connect to now?
    • What interventions are successful at closing or minimizing inequities between populations regarding childhood achievement (beyond overall improvements)?
    • Gaps of understanding the language between the various sectors that touch the lives of young children. Alignment so families feel supported in an integrated fashion.
    • Peer-to-peer capacity building with parents and providers/teachers.
    • More understanding about how parents are engaged outside of the provider setting.
    • Role of environmental toxicants (e.g., heavy metals) in successful vocabulary development.
    • Increase the communication between health/education sectors.
    • How to scale when so much engagement of families requires the need to differentiate by method, content, format. Are there identified best practices in the field?
    • Funding—how do we make this a priority for policy makers?
    • On partnerships: what are the critical success factors for creating a multisector partnership?
    • How do we help school systems see ECE and health care services?
    • Support for translational efforts, technical assistance, and cross-sector training.
  1. New insights (e.g., what you need to know about parents, teachers, caregivers)
    • What do parents want out of their ECE settings? Where is their voice?
    • As we move toward universal opportunity for pre-K, are the pre-K educators part of the public school system? Same criteria for hiring?
    • How do you define early care and education?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
  • How does the use of home care vary across the 0–5 age range?
  • Are 60 percent of 6-month-olds in child care?
  • Given focus on low income, are there lessons learned from mainstream (not economically challenged) that we should make sure is available to all, for equity?
  • How are educational programs for ECE providers incorporating health into the curriculum?
  • How can we honor and show respect for the people engaged in this work over decades of time?
  • What is the evidence base regarding the costs of high-quality pre-K? To spread and scale, policy makers need to know general costs and cost-effectiveness (costs per outcomes gained).
  • How are outcomes shared across sectors systematically?
  • Does it ever undermine parenting confidence to offer programs that suggest they need assistance?
  • What are the cultural norms of the families we are working with?
  • Understand what families know about their child’s development, and individualize from there to support developmentally appropriate information.
  • Have we thought about grandparents as a trusted role model for parents and children?
  • How can community health workers play a role?
  • How can health care providers and systems help parents, caregivers?
  • Approach to understanding of developmental delays.
  • If we paid family members to stay home and care for 0–3 as a job, would that improve outcomes?
  • Beyond outcomes regarding child achievement and wellness, what metrics matter to parents and caregivers regarding their own goals—use these when developing and evaluating programs, too.
  • Are there ways we can encourage environmental supports to help families so they aren’t making behavioral change (i.e., talking to baby) in a vacuum?
  • What do working parents need to learn about spending time with their children?
  • We have to hold families’ culture at the center of our actions. This is hard and has to be revisited all the time.
  • Status of parents/caregivers’ mental health as it impacts their ability to care for their children.
  • Do parents respond better to messages of preventing problems than meeting aspirations for their child? If no, what are implications for building awareness and buy-in?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
  • Parents need respectful culture-based engagement and mutual definitions of quality.
  • Understand the risk factors [parents and caregivers] are experiencing and support the integration of a protective factors framework.
  • Their own perspective of capacities to influence health—how can they truly co-create a system that promotes health?
  • How are technology applications and tools impacting language and activity of young children? Are ECE providers aware of new or existing recommendations? How to communicate them?

Topic 2: Collaboration

  1. How can we accelerate cross-sector collaboration in ECE and health? What do you need to help you and your organization collaborate effectively?
    • Leverage health sector requirements (e.g., CHNA) that can directly spark collaboration with other sectors, particularly as they relate to child health needs.
    • Nonprofit hospital community benefit is a $26 billion federal tax exemption.
    • How far would this go to close ECE equity gaps?
    • Resource redirection.
    • Getting funders to reallocate up front to gain better outcomes.
    • More opportunities for learning between early childhood education teachers and pediatricians.
    • Bridge the knowledge gap in both sectors.
    • Professional development conferences that are cross-sector.
    • Build ECE engagement with pediatric care into ACO quality metrics.
    • Honor the work that has been done over time that leads to where we are now.
    • Bring in as many perspectives as possible—together we are better!
    • Incentives, awareness, common motivation.
    • Regulations that are connected.
    • Incentives.
    • Training—not just usual suspects.
    • Use asset-based approach to leverage what’s working and be willing to work in different ways together.
    • To collaborate with policy professionals and advocates, more attention and strategic thinking/planning needs to happen in regard to financing models.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
    • Funds and incentives work to redirect who is involved.
    • Metrics can drive action and funding drive and link metrics.
    • Streamlining of funding mechanisms.
    • Shared approaches and objectives by main funders.
  1. Main barriers to collaboration and the solutions to them?
    • Lack of shared purpose and goals, not enough systems thinking.
    • Competing agendas.
    • There is an art and skill to learn how to do collaboration, especially across sectors.
    • Lack of shared evaluation and mechanisms and data platforms.
    • Upfront commitment to best possible goals and data-gathering processes. This maximizes outcomes and decreases level of needed investment in new data systems.
    • Leadership commitment.
    • Shared information and data.
    • Lack of understanding perspectives, silos.
    • Understanding the benefits and challenges for all partners.
    • Are they effective? How do we measure how collaborations are affecting population-level outcomes?
    • Takes more time that = more money. Few funders really support those costs.
    • Turf.
    • The complexities of the issues surrounding early childhood make it difficult to prioritize where public and private efforts should be focused.
    • Lack of skills on how to build strong partnerships.
    • Common language: agreed upon goals, metrics.
    • Data sharing and alignment.
    • Trust, history of working together.
    • Funding systems tend to be siloed—fund collaborative teams.
    • Core funding for integration functions.
    • Silos, jargon, lack of personal relationships.
    • Lack of funding.
    • Need to have common grounding in theory and best practices in ECE.
    • Independent goals, funders, strategic plans, metrics—must align in a true collaborative.
    • Barriers: disconnected academic communities—solution: opportunities like today.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
  1. What have we learned from other cross-sector collaborations that could help to inform ECE/health interactions?
    • Intentionality; clear agreement on early outcomes and shared credit; leadership commitment.
    • Review ReThink Health Pathway Model.
    • Be open, understand that formal definitions of quality might not bring all who need to be at the table to the table.
    • Collaboration costs—need “glue” money.
    • Clear rules of engagement: bylaws, expectations, collective impact, buy-in—hard but critical.
    • Center for Work, Health, & Well-Being.
    • Cross-sector collaborations tend to be more effective than larger-scale ways to effect change.
    • Collaborative funding is key.
    • Make case about root cause to push many people together for collaboration.
    • Create small group of passionate leaders to drive and oversee the collaboration; leaders have to bring an equity lens.
    • You need clarity on the results and then identify shared measures and metrics.
    • Personal relationships are key: people make change.
    • The importance of partnering with community members at the program development stage → evolution in authentic, bidirectional way.
    • [Look at] Healthy Monadnock 2020.
    • Be the Change San Diego, ReThink Health Ventures; Atlanta Regional Collaboration for Health Improvement.
    • Relationships are key; start with small goals and wins; it takes time.
    • Partnerships and governance structures are key.
    • Who is at the table, and are they contributing?
    • How are they organized to do work, accountable for impact?
    • How are city, health systems structured and organized to support work, and are they active partners?
    • You need to be intentional, focused, and organized. Effective collaboration does not just happen.
    • Importance of anchor institutions.
  2. New insights?
    • Let health sector take more of a leadership role in early childhood development system building 0–3.
    • There is more to sustainability than funding.
    • Rethink what is already in place, asset-based approach.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
  • 10:1 gap in eligibility: enrollment is shocking.
  • Public–private partnerships and collaboration—get clarity on roles and levers in public sector versus private sector.
  • We’re doing similar work in ECE—how can we learn from each other, so we don’t all need to “reinvent the wheel”?
  • Lincoln, NE, is a great example of a holistic, community-driven approach.
  • Building vocabulary can improve population health.
  • ParentCorps resources.

Topic 3: Policy

  1. What are the main policy levers that could support the spread/scale of health/ECE coordination?
    • Require hospital to use a percent of community benefit dollars to invest in ECE.
    • Developmental screening for all.
    • Strengthen focus on well-being and social emotional learning for workforce.
    • Specific for Paula—require 25 percent of nonprofit hospital tax advantage provided in each local area (but what about for profits?).
    • Developing competencies that elevate all without making care-taking inaccessible to those in our immigrant or low-income communities. Think access to providers that look/sound like me.
    • Cohort training models, cultural brokers, developed with the communities.
    • Universal pre-K.
    • Quality standards for providers.
    • Training for parents.
    • Nurse–family partnership and/or similar home visiting programs.
    • Need greater alignment of MCH and ECE.
    • Broaden advocacy base to unsuspecting partners, such as Fight Crime, Invest in Kids.
  2. What policy actions can be taken to address some of the challenges in spreading and scaling effective early childhood care and education interventions and programs?
    • No more investments in new models; focus on scaling those we know work.
    • Health plans provide enhanced rates for implementation.
    • Centralized repository of evidence-based practices tied to health and education guidelines.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
    • Give funding for careful implementation and innovation not just evidence-based programs.
    • Federal tax incentives.
    • Engage national employers.
    • Pay for value-based health care to drive ECE outcomes since all of the dollars are in health care—use these dollars to pay for what works in ECE.
    • Requiring definitions of quality to be rooted in community values in addition to evidence-based practice so all will want to access high-quality care.
    • Focus more on building capacity to teach practice in adults in settings other than evidence-based programs.
    • Braided funding to support effective inclusion practices.
    • Federal government provides technical assistance and support focused on prevention.
    • Advocacy rooted in communities that builds demand for quality.
  1. What needs to be done to support and increase investments for new ideas and innovation in early childhood care and education?
    • Focus on workforce and packaging what they need in evidence-based supports, including compensation.
    • Elevate best practices with public–private partnerships—look at tobacco or sugar-sweetened beverage taxes, tax credits, business champions for fundraising.
    • Create scorecards for each elected official’s district/jurisdiction that includes reading by grade 3 by district/race/ethnicity/income; also graduation rates and link to early childhood education rates.
    • Training and education of health care providers at every level—undergrad, medical school, residency, and continuing education—should include exposure to role of early childhood care and education.
    • Get early childhood interventions (high-quality, accessible early care and learning) on radar of ACOs and hospitals and health systems before they move to value-based payment system.
    • Make the case; find start-up prevention dollars, show how money is saved, costs avoided through prevention to sustain and increase investments.
    • Health care and education—where money is in the system and sector that save when early childhood prevention is done well.
    • Need to explore how existing funds are being used to support ECE and health—look for duplication of effort.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
    • Ensure that business leaders and politicians understand the ROI in multiple budgets from ECE money.
    • Don’t assume that a rationale of benefit to children is sufficient.
    • Use implementation science—performance evaluations more for learning, not just focus on outcomes.
    • CMMI needs to release FOA on children.
    • Establish economic developmental sequelae—cost to society.
    • Frame the message and ask to speak to language/interest of different sectors.
    • Think outside the “children’s advocacy” silo.
    • →research→advocacy→messaging→research, etc.
    • Local community organizing.
    • Understand how tax policy can be part of the answer.
    • Include ECE in student funding formula for school.
    • ECE and K–12 health systems—[public] health, pediatricians, and business all work together.
  1. What policy actions can be taken to increase collaboration and synergies between those working in the health sector and the early childhood care and education sector?
    • Align, harmonize, or collaborate on community needs assessments both sectors do (see National Academies report Communities in Action).
    • Mandate screening in pediatrics for social determinants of health.
    • Have IRS-required attention to ECE as a part of every CHNA.
    • Absenteeism as common outcome.
    • Need the forums for conversation, engagement, and problem solving between and across sectors.
    • Link ACO and MIPS/MACRA quality metrics with early childhood care and education for pediatric visits.
    • Required ECE landscape assessment as part of CHNA.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Gallery Walk Questions and Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25129.
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Next: Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators »
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On September 14, 2017, the Roundtable on Population Health Improvement of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to explore the intersection of health and early childhood care and education, two key social determinants of health. This workshop follows a 2014 roundtable workshop that considered the interface between the education and health sectors broadly, from research and metrics to cross-sectoral partnerships and financing. The 2017 workshop continued that discussion, with a deeper focus on early childhood (birth through age 5) as a critical period in human development and an important opportunity for educational and related interventions. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the 2017 workshop.

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