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Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017 (2018)

Chapter: 3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership

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Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
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3
Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership

When a sponsor requests that the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine conduct a study, an ad hoc committee is established for that purpose. The committee terminates when the study is completed. These study committees are subject to the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Section 15, because they provide advice and recommendations to the federal government. The Space Studies Board (SSB) and/or one of its standing committees provide oversight for ad hoc study committee activities. Eleven ad hoc study committees and five panels and were active during 2017; their activities and membership are summarized below. The SSB collaborated on one study with the Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA), one study with the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB), and one study with the following boards of the Division on Earth and Life Studies: the Board on Atmospheric Science and Climate/Polar Research Board (BASCPR), the Board on Earth Science and Resources (BESR), the Ocean Studies Board (OSB), and the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB).

ASTROBIOLOGY SCIENCE STRATEGY FOR THE SEARCH FOR LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE

The Committee on an Astrobiology Science Strategy for the Search for Life in the Universe was formally appointed in November 2017 and is chaired by Barbara Sherwood Lollar of the University of Toronto. The committee was established as the response of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) to direction from Congress contained in the NASA Transition Authorization Act of 2017. The committee’s three scheduled meetings will be held on January 16-18 (Irvine, California), March 6-8 (Washington, D.C.), and April 25-27 (Washington, D.C.). A prepublication is due to NASA by the end of August 2018.

Membership

Barbara Sherwood Lollar, University of Toronto (chair)

Sushil K. Atreya, University of Michigan

Alan P. Boss, Carnegie Institution of Washington

Paul G. Falkowski, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Jack D. Farmer, Arizona State University

Olivier Guyon, University of Arizona

Gerald F. Joyce, Salk Institute for Biological Studies

James F. Kasting, Pennsylvania State University

Victoria S. Meadows, University of Washington

Philip M. Neches, Teradata Corporation

Carl B. Pilcher, Blue Marble Space Institute of Science

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×

Nilton O. Renno, University of Michigan

Karen L. Rogers, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Britney E. Schmidt, Georgia Institute of Technology

Roger Summons, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Frances Westall, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

Shelley A. Wright, University of San Diego

Staff

David H. Smith, Senior Program Officer, SSB

Sarah Brothers, Associate Program Officer, SSB (from September)

Anesia Wilks, Senior Program Assistant, SSB

BEST PRACTICES FOR A FUTURE OPEN CODE POLICY FOR NASA SPACE SCIENCE

The Committee on Best Practices for a Future Open Code Policy for NASA Space Science was appointed in September 2017. The study is to investigate and recommend best practices for NASA as it considers whether to establish an open code and open models policy, complementary to its current open data policy. The committee held its first meeting November 14-16, 2017, in Washington, D.C. Highlights of the committee’s meeting include briefings from Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate (SMD), on the current policies and study expectations, and a panel discussion among representatives from each SMD division about unique needs for each division. The committee also received several presentations about initiatives for and perspectives on open science and open code in different communities. The committee’s next information-gathering meetings are scheduled for January 17-19, 2018, in Washington, D.C., and February 26-28 in Irvine, California.

Membership

Chelle L. Gentemann, Earth and Space Research (co-chair)

Mark A. Parsons, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (co-chair)

Lorena A. Barba, George Washington University

Kelle Cruz, Hunter College

Brenda J. Dietrich, Cornell University

Christopher L. Fryer, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Joe Giacalone, University of Arizona

Sara J. Graves, University of Alabama, Huntsville

Joseph Harrington, University of Central Florida

Elva J. Jones, Winston-Salem State University

Maria M. Kuznetsova, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Clifford A. Lynch, Coalition for Networked Information

Melissa A. McGrath, SETI Institute

Aaron Ridley, University of Michigan

Staff

Abigail Sheffer, Senior Program Officer, SSB

Nathan Boll, Associate Program Officer, SSB (from July)

Anesia Wilks, Senior Program Assistant, SSB

DECADAL SURVEY FOR EARTH SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS FROM SPACE

The 2017-2027 decadal survey for Earth science and applications from space (ESAS 2017; http://www.nas.edu/esas2017) was very active during the first quarter with numerous teleconferences among and between the steering committee and its five study panels. In addition, the survey steering committee met in person for their

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×

fourth and fifth meetings on January 18-20, 2017, at the Beckman Center in Irvine, California, and on March 6-8, 2017, in Washington, D.C., respectively. Public sessions at the January meeting included discussions with George Komar, associate director of NASA’s Earth Science Division and program manager of the Earth Science Technology Office and Karen St. Germain, director, Office of Systems Architecture and Advanced Planning, NOAA NESDIS. During the meeting, the committee also hosted a virtual town hall via WebEx that provided an update to the community on survey progress. On January 24, 2017, the survey co-chairs hosted a community forum on the decadal survey during the 97th Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society, which was held in Seattle, Washington. The steering committee’s fifth meeting did not include public sessions. The survey study panels met together—along with a number of steering committee members—for their third and final meeting, which was held at the Beckman Center in Irvine, California, from February 15-18, 2017.

During the second quarter of 2017, the steering committee met in person for their sixth and seventh meetings on May 9-11, 2017, and June 19-20, 2017, in Boulder, Colorado, and Irvine, California, respectively. A draft from the ESAS 2017 committee entered the National Academies review process in late August. As the third quarter ended, the steering committee, along with its study panels and staff, was working on responding to report review.

A draft decadal survey was approved on December 30, 2017. A prepublication version of Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space is available at http://www.nap.edu/catalog/24938/thriving-on-our-changing-planet-a-decadal-strategy-for-earth. As the fourth quarter ended, the steering committee was preparing for public release on January 5, 2018, and briefings to the study’s sponsors—NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—as well as to Executive Branch and congressional staff. Town Hall discussions were also scheduled on January 10, 2018, at the 98th annual meeting of the American Meteorological Society in Austin Texas and on February 14, 2018, at the 2018 Americal Geophysical Union Ocean Sciences meeting in Portland, Oregon.

More than 100 members of the community served on one or more of the survey’s committees or panels. The survey’s website includes newsletters to the community, links to community responses to survey requests for information (RFIs), information on the organization of the survey and its members, and archives that include presentations made to the committee and by the committee at previous town hall presentations. A final version of the survey publication and a popularization of the survey are expected to be published in spring 2018.

Membership

Waleed Abdalati, University of Colorado, Boulder (co-chair)

Antonio J. Busalacchi Jr.,* University of Maryland, College Park (co-chair)

William B. Gail, Global Weather Corporation (co-chair)

Steven J. Battel, Battel Engineering, Inc.

Stacey Boland, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Robert D. Braun, University of Colorado

Shuyi S. Chen, University of Washington

William E. Dietrich, University of California, Berkeley

Scott C. Doney, University of Virginia

Christopher B. Field, Stanford University

Helen A. Fricker, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Sarah T. Gille, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Dennis L. Hartmann, University of Washington

Daniel J. Jacob, Harvard University

Anthony C. Janetos, Boston University

Everette Joseph, University of Albany, State University of New York

Molly K. Macauley, Resources for the Future

Joyce E. Penner, University of Michigan

Soroosh Sorooshian, University of California, Irvine

Graeme L. Stephens, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

Byron D. Tapley, University of Texas, Austin

W. Stanley Wilson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×

Staff

Arthur A. Charo, ESAS 2017 Study Director and Senior Program Officer, SSB

Lauren Everett, Program Officer, BASCPR

Charlie Harris, Research Associate, SSB (through August 2016)

Marchel Holle, Research Associate, SSB (from November 2016)

Andrea Rebholz, Program Coordinator, ASEB

___________________

* Resigned May 5, 2016, following the announcement of his appointment as president of UCAR.

As of June 1, 2016.

Deceased July 8, 2016.

Panel on Weather and Air Quality: Minutes to Subseasonal

Steven A. Ackerman, University of Wisconsin, Madison (co-chair)

Nancy L. Baker, Naval Research Laboratory (co-chair)

Philip E. Ardanuy, INNOVIM, LLC

Elizabeth A. Barnes, Colorado State University

Stanley G. Benjamin, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Mark A. Bourassa, Florida State University

Bryan N. Duncan, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Charles E. Kolb, Aerodyne Research, Inc.

Ying-Hwa Kuo, * University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

W. Paul Menzel, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Maria A. Pirone, Harris Corporation

Armistead G. Russell, Georgia Institute of Technology

Julie O. Thomas, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego

Duane E. Waliser, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

Xubin Zeng, University of Arizona

Sandra Graham, Senior Program Officer, SSB

Andrea Rebholz, Program Associate, ASEB

___________________

* Resigned September 14, 2016.

Panel on Climate Variability and Change: Seasonal to Centennial

Carol Anne Clayson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (co-chair)

Venkatachalam Ramaswamy, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (co-chair)

Arlyn E. Andrews, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory

Enrique Curchitser, Rutgers University

Lee-Lueng Fu, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Guido Grosse, Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research

Randal D. Koster, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Sonia Kreidenweis, Colorado State University

Emilio F. Moran, Michigan State University

Cora E. Randall, University of Colorado

Philip J. Rasch, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Eric J. Rignot, University of California, Irvine

Christopher Ruf, University of Michigan

Ross J. Salawitch, University of Maryland

Amy K. Snover, University of Washington

Julienne C. Stroeve, University of Colorado, Boulder

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×

Bruce A. Wielicki, NASA Langley Research Center

Gary W. Yohe, Wesleyan University

Lauren Everett, Program Officer, BASCPR

Erin Markovich, Senior Program Assistant, BASCPR

Panel on Earth Surface and Interior: Dynamics and Hazards

Douglas W. Burbank, University of California, Santa Barbara (co-chair)

David T. Sandwell, Scripps Institution of Oceanography (co-chair)

Robin E. Bell, Columbia University

Emily E. Brodsky, University of California, Santa Cruz

Donald P. Chambers, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg

Lucy Flesch, Purdue University

George E. Hilley, Stanford University

Kristine M. Larson, University of Colorado, Boulder

Stefan Maus, University of Colorado, Boulder

Michael S. Ramsey, University of Pittsburgh

Jeanne Sauber, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Khalid A. Soofi, ConocoPhillips

Howard A. Zebker, Stanford University

Anne Linn, Scholar, BESR

Eric Edkin, Senior Program Assistant, BESR

Panel on Global Hydrological Cycles and Water Resources

Ana P. Barros, Duke University (co-chair)

Jeff Dozier, University of California, Santa Barbara (co-chair)

Newsha Ajami, Stanford University

John D. Bolten, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Dara Entekhabi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Graham E. Fogg, University of California, Davis

Efi Foufoula-Georgiou, University of California, Irvine

David C. Goodrich, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Terri S. Hogue, Colorado School of Mines

Jeffrey S. Kargel, University of Arizona

Christian D. Kummerow, Colorado State University

Venkat Lakshmi, University of South Carolina

Andrea Rinaldo,* École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Edwin Welles, Deltares USA Inc.

Eric F. Wood, Princeton University

Ed Dunne, Program Officer, WSTB (through July 2017)

Lauren Everett, Program Officer, BASCPR (from July 2017)

Tamara Dawson, Program Coordinator, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology

___________________

* Resigned June 6, 2017.

Panel on Marine and Terrestrial Ecosystems and Natural Resource Management

Compton J. Tucker, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (co-chair)

James A. Yoder, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (co-chair)

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×

Gregory P. Asner, Carnegie Institution for Science

Francisco Chavez, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Inez Y. Fung, University of California, Berkeley

Scott Goetz, Woods Hole Research Center

Patrick N. Halpin, Duke University

Eric Hochberg, Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences

Christian J. Johannsen, Purdue University

Raphael M. Kudela, University of California, Santa Cruz

Gregory W. McCarty, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Linda O. Mearns, National Center for Atmospheric Research

Lesley E. Ott, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Mary Jane Perry, University of Maine

David A. Siegel, University of California, Santa Barbara

David L. Skole, Michigan State University

Susan L. Ustin, University of California, Davis

Cara Wilson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Constance Karras, Associate Program Officer, OSB

Payton Kulina, Senior Program Assistant, OSB (through September 2016)

Alexandra Phillips, Senior Program Assistant, OSB (from September 2016)

James Heiss, Postdoctoral Fellow

EXOPLANET SCIENCE STRATEGY

The Committee on an Exoplanet Science Strategy is currently being recruited; it is expected that they will be appointed in early 2018. This study was requested by NASAs SMD in response to direction from a congressional mandate contained in the NASA Transition Authorization Act of 2017. It is anticipated that the committee will hold its first meeting in the first quarter of 2018. A prepublication is due to NASA by the end of August 2018.

Membership*

David Charbonneau, Harvard University (co-chair)

B. Scott Gaudi, Ohio State University (co-chair)

Fabienne Bastien, Pennsylvania State University

Jacob Bean, University of Chicago

Justin R. Crepp, University of Notre Dame

Eliza Kempton, Grinnell College

Chryssa Kouveliotou, The George Washington University

Bruce Macintosh, Stanford University

Dimitri P. Mawet, California Institute of Technology

Victoria S. Meadows, University of Washington

Ruth Murray-Clay, University of California, Santa Cruz

Evgenya L. Shkolnik, Arizona State University

Alycia J. Weinberger, Carnegie Institution of Washington

Staff

David B. Lang, Senior Program Officer, BPA

Christopher Jones, Program Officer, BPA

Nathan Boll, Associate Program Officer, SSB (from July)

Dionna Wise, Program Coordinator, SSB

___________________

* Terms began in 2018.

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×

EXTRATERRESTRIAL SAMPLE ANALYSIS FACILITIES

The Committee on Extraterrestrial Sample Analysis Facilities was appointed in August 2017. The study is to prepare for what laboratory analytical capabilities and infrastructure will be needed by NASA’s Planetary Science Division (and partners’) analysis and curation of existing and future extraterrestrial samples. The committee held its first meeting November 19-21, 2017, in Irvine, California. The committee heard presentations about current and proposed future NASA sample return missions, including the planned architecture for Mars Sample Return, the OSIRIS-Rex asteroid sample return mission, the CORSAIR comet surface sample return mission concept, and the MoonRise lunar sampler return mission concept. The committee also heard from the Curation and Analysis Planning Team for Extraterrestrial Materials, from the Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office at NASA-Johnson Space Center, and about the Smithsonian Institution’s meteorite collection and curation. The committee’s next information-gathering meetings are planned for January 22-24, 2018, in Houston, Texas, and April 3-5, 2018, in Washington, D.C.

Membership

Roberta L. Rudnick, University of California, Santa Barbara (chair)

James H. Crocker, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company

Vinayak P. Dravid, Northwester University

John M. Eiler, California Institute of Technology

Katherine H. Freeman, Pennsylvania State University

Abby Kavner, University of California, Los Angeles

Timothy J. McCoy, Smithsonian Institution

Clive R. Neal, University of Notre Dame

Frank M. Richter, University of Chicago

Hanika Rizo, Carleton University

Kimberly T. Tait, Royal Ontario Museum

Staff

Abigail Sheffer, Senior Program Officer, SSB

Sarah Brothers, Associate Program Officer, SSB (from September)

Anesia Wilks, Senior Program Assistant, SSB

LARGE STRATEGIC NASA SCIENCE MISSIONS: SCIENCE VALUE AND ROLE IN A BALANCED PORTFOLIO

The Committee on Large Strategic NASA Science Missions: Science Value and Role in a Balanced Portfolio began in 2016, the committee held its final meeting February 15-17, 2017, at the Keck Center of the National Academies where it heard from NASA officials about the status of the science divisions. The committee’s draft entered review in May and was approved for release in July. The prepublication was delivered to NASA in early August and released to the public shortly after. The final publication was available in December 2017.

The committee co-chairs Ralph McNutt and Kathryn Thornton briefed NASA associate administrator for science, Thomas Zurbuchen, and his staff, as well as staff of the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee and the House Appropriations Committee. In December 2017, committee co-chair Kathy Thornton and study director Dwayne Day briefed numerous people at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory who were interested in how the publication’s recommendations may affect future large strategic missions. The summary of this publication can be found in Chapter 5.

Membership

Ralph L. McNutt, Jr., Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (co-chair)

Kathryn C. Thornton, University of Virginia (co-chair)

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×

David A. Bearden, The Aerospace Corporation

Joel N. Bregman, University of Michigan

Anny Cazenave, International Space Sciences Institute, Bern, Switzerland

Anne R. Douglass, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Victoria E. Hamilton, Southwest Research Institute

Marc L. Imhoff, University of Maryland

Charles D. Norton, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

Carol S. Paty, Georgia Institute of Technology

Marc D. Rayman, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

William S. Smith, ScienceWorks International

Edward L. Wright, University of California, Los Angeles

Gary P. Zank, University of Alabama, Huntsville

Staff

Dwayne A. Day, Senior Program Officer, ASEB

Mia Brown, Research Associate, SSB (from December 2016)

Katie Daud, Research Associate, SSB (through December 2016)

Anesia Wilks, Senior Program Assistant, SSB

MIDTERM ASSESSMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DECADAL SURVEY ON LIFE AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES RESEARCH AT NASA

The Committee on a Midterm Assessment of Implementation of the Decadal Survey on Life and Physical Sciences Research at NASA held its first meeting on February 7-9, 2017, in Washington, D.C.The committee first met with Craig Kundrot, director of the NASA Division of Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications (SLPSRA), who provided an overview of the organization as well as its relationship to the decadal survey. Next, Francis Chiaramonte, David Tomko, Steve Davison, and Dr. Mark Lee briefed the committee on the research and accomplishments of the four SLPSRA research subdivisions including physical sciences, biological sciences program, human research, and fundamental physics. NASA Deputy Chief Scientist Gale Allen provided context for SLPSRA’s role within NASA, including organizational connections and potential future roles. Julie Robinson, ISS chief scientist, briefed the committee on ISS research, past, present, and future. She highlighted groundbreaking discoveries, including the “Cool Flames” experiment. The committee’s open session ended on the second day with a briefing from Michael Roberts, deputy chief scientist at the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) about the role of CASIS in microgravity research. The committee spent the remainder of its meeting in closed session reviewing materials, developing data requests, and conducting task and meeting planning—with a particular focus on plans for a community input colloquium during its next meeting. Following the February meeting, the committee continued to work on developing, organizing, and publicizing this event.

The committee held its second and third meetings on April 18-20 in Washington, D.C. and on June 20-22, 2017, in Woods Hole, MA, respectively. As part of its April meeting the committee held a 1 day Community Input Colloquium, which included six moderated panel sessions, each focused on a broad area of microgravity research. The live-streamed event had been widely advertised in the research community and was well attended by researchers, both in person on online. Both the presentations and discussions were organized with the goals of addressing discipline-specific questions relevant to the statement of task and enabling the committee to hear from the larger community on a range of issues and challenges. In addition to the colloquium presentations, the committee also heard from SLPSRA director, Craig Kundrot on grant data sets requested by the committee for its work, and from Kris Kandarpa (National Institutes of Health), Richard Ricker (National Institute of Standards and Technology) and Vyacheslav Lukin (NSF) regarding synergies between research at their agencies and NASA.

Following its April meeting, the committee continued to work closely with SLPSRA on obtaining comprehensive data sets for SLPSRA grant and ISS research activities. At its June meeting, the committee was briefed by ISS chief scientist Julie Robinson on one of these data sets; and by ISS deputy director Robyn Gatens on NASA’s evolving strategy for the ISS and exploration in the 2024 timeframe. The majority of the June meeting was held in closed session and was focused on analysis and draft development.

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×

The committee held its final meeting on August 28-30 in Irvine, California where it focused on revisions and reviewing and finalizing its findings and recommendations. No open sessions were held. Following the meeting, the committee continued to work intensively on preparing the draft for external review and later to respond to report review comments from a broad set of external reviewers. The report approval process was completed in early December. The committee prepublication, A Midterm Assessment of Implementation of the Decadal Survey on Life and Physical Sciences Research at NASA, was subsequently delivered to NASA on December 12, 2017, and released to the public on December 15, 2017. Committee Chairs Daniel Dumbacher and Robert Ferl briefed both NASA and congressional staff on December 14, 2017, and additional government briefings and dissemination activities are planned for early 2018. The document is currently being edited for final publication in the spring of 2018. The summary of this publication can be found in Chapter 5.

Membership

Daniel L. Dumbacher, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (co-chair)

Robert J. Ferl, University of Florida (co-chair)

Reza Abbaschian, University of California, Riverside

Alan R. Hargens, University of California, San Diego

Yiguang Ju, Princeton University

Dominique Langevin, Laboratoire de Physique des Solides of the University Paris Sud

Gloria R. Leon, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

W. Carl Lineberger, University of Colorado, Boulder

Elliot M. Meyerowitz, California Institute of Technology

Todd J. Mosher, Syncroness

Elaine Oran,* University of Maryland, College Park

James A. Pawelczyk, Pennsylvania State University

James T’ien, Case Western Reserve University

Mark M. Weislogel, Portland State University

Gayle E. Woloschak, Northwestern University

Staff

Sandra J. Graham, Senior Program Officer

Marchel Holle, Research Associate

Dionna Wise, Program Coordinator

___________________

* Resigned April 21, 2017.

PLANETARY PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS FOR SAMPLE-RETURN MISSIONS FROM MARTIAN MOONS

The Committee on Planetary Protection Requirements for Sample-Return Missions from Martian Moons is a joint activity between the SSB and the European Space Science Committee of the European Science Foundation (ESF), with some participation by Japanese scientists. The committee is the result of parallel requests sent by the Planetary Protection Offices of NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) to the National Academies and ESF, respectively, to assess the results of research jointly sponsored by NASA and ESA on whether or not hypothetical martian organisms can survive ejection from the surface of Mars during a giant impact and subsequent emplacement on the surfaces of Phobos and Deimos. A major goal of this activity is to determine whether or not samples returned from the martian moons receive a planetary protection classification of “restricted” or “unrestricted” Earth return. The joint committee met in London, United Kingdom on November 7-9, 2017. A prepublication is due to be delivered to NASA and ESA in the spring of 2018.

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×

Membership

David Pearce, Nothumbria University (chair)

Athena Coustenis, National Centre for Scientific Research of France

Michael J. Daly, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

Abigail Fraeman, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Guy Libourel, Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur

Akiko Nakamura, Kobe University

Robin Putzar, Fraunhoffer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics

Kaliat T. Ramesh, Johns Hopkins University

Norman H. Sleep, Stanford University

Megan B. Syal, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Staff

David H. Smith, Senior Program Officer, SSB

Mia Brown, Research Associate, SSB

Andrea Rebholz, Program Coordinator, ASEB

REVIEW OF NASA’S PLANETARY SCIENCE DIVISION’S RESTRUCTURED RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS PROGRAMS

The Committee on the Review of NASA’s Planetary Science Division’s Restructured Research and Analysis Programs has completed all of its planned meetings in 2016. A complete draft of the committee’s draft was assembled late in 2016 and the committee spent the first few months of 2017 responding to reviewer comments. A revised draft was approved for release by the National Academies on March 14, 2017. A complete, edited prepublication was delivered to NASA on April 19, 2017 and the chair of the committee briefed the leadership of NASA SMD on the publication’s conclusions and recommendations on April 21, 2017. The public release of the publication was April 26, 2017. The summary of this publication can be found in Chapter 5

Membership

Stephen J. Mackwell, Universities Space Research Association (chair)

Michael F. A’Hearn, University of Maryland, College

Joseph K. Alexander, Alexander Space Policy Consultants

Joseph A. Burns, Cornell University

Larry W. Esposito, University of Colorado, Boulder

G. Scott Hubbard, Stanford University

Torrence V. Johnson, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Makenzie Lystrup, Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation

Juan Perez-Mercader, Harvard University

John D. Rummel, SETI Institute

Staff

David Smith, Senior Program Officer

Mia Brown, Research Associate, SSB (from December 2016)

Katie Daud, Research Associate, SSB (through December 2016)

Dionna Wise, Program Coordinator

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×

REVIEW OF PLANETARY PROTECTION POLICY DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES

The Committee on the Review of Planetary Protection Policy Development Processes, was formally appointed in February 2017 and held its first meeting at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., on March 7-9, 2017. Following the receipt of a request from NASA in December 2016 for the committee to issue an interim publication, the first meeting was devoted exclusively to beginning work on a short document outlining the goals, rationales, and definition of planetary protection. Work on the interim draft continued until mid-April. The draft was sent to eight external reviewers for comment on April 21 and delivered to NASA on June 7, 2017. Joseph Alexander, the committee’s chair, briefed NASA on June 13. The committee’s final three planned meetings took place in Washington, D.C., Irvine, California, and Woods Hole, Massachusetts on May 23-25, June 27-29, and August 8-10, respectively. The committee schedule calls for a prepublication to be delivered to NASA in spring 2018.

Membership

Joseph K. Alexander, Alexander Space Policy Consultants (chair)

John R. Casani, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (retired)

Leroy Chiao, OneOrbit, LLC

David P. Fidler, Indiana University

Joanne Gabrynowicz, University of Mississippi

G. Scott Hubbard, Stanford University

Eugene H. Levy, Rice University

Norine E. Noonan, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg

Kenneth Olden, Environmental Protection Agency

Francois Raulin, Universite de Paris

Gary Ruvkun, Massachusetts General Hospital

Mark P. Saunders, Independent Consultant

Beth A. Simmons, University of Pennsylvania

Pericles D. Stabekis, Independent Consultant

Andrew Steele, Carnegie Institution of Washington

Staff

David H. Smith, Senior Program Officer, SSB

Mia Brown, Research Associate, SSB

Andrea Rebholz, Program Coordinator, ASEB

REVIEW OF PROGRESS TOWARD IMPLEMENTING THE DECADAL SURVEY VISION AND VOYAGES FOR PLANETARY SCIENCES

The Committee on the Review of Progress Toward Implementing the Decadal Survey Vision and Voyages for Planetary Sciences was approved in late February 2017. The committee is co-chaired by Louise Prockter of the Lunar and Planetary Institute and Joseph Rothenberg, formerly of Google.

In March 2017, shortly after the committee was appointed, the NASA Authorization Act was signed into law and included provisions for an Academies assessment of NASA’s Mars Exploration Program. NASA and the Academies determined that the best course of action would be to incorporate this assessment into the mid-term review and to add several members with Mars expertise.

The committee met May 4-5, 2017 at the Keck Center in Washington, DC; July 11-13 at CalTech in Pasadena, CA; August 28-30, 2017 in Woods Hole, MA; and November 29-December 1, 2017 in Irvine, CA. A fifth meeting is scheduled for February 26-28, 2018 in Washington, DC. The introduction of a new NASA architecture proposal for Mars sample return during the August meeting complicated the committee’s work and the committee requested additional information on Mars sample return technology development for its Irvine meeting. The committee was impressed with the detail it received on the Mars technology development and has begun writing its final draft. The committee aims to deliver its prepublication to NASA in summer 2018.

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×

Membership

Louise M. Prockter, Lunar and Planetary Institute (co-chair)

Joseph H. Rothenberg, Independent Consultant (co-chair)

David A. Bearden, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Scott Bolton, Southwest Research Institute

Barbara A. Cohen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Andrew M. Davis, The University of Chicago

Melinda D. Dyar, Mount Holyoke College

Alan W. Harris, MoreData! Inc.

Amanda R. Hendrix, Planetary Science Institute

Bruce M. Jakosky, University of Colorado Boulder

Margaret G. Kivelson, University of California, Los Angeles

Scott L. Murchie, Johns Hopkins University

Juan Perez-Mercader, Harvard University

Mark P. Saunders, Independent Consultant

Suzanne Smrekar, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

David J. Stevenson, California Institute of Technology

Staff

Dwayne A. Day, Senior Program Officer, ASEB

Mia Brown, Research Associate, SSB

Dionna Wise, Program Coordinator, SSB

Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 27
Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 29
Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 30
Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 31
Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 32
Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 33
Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 34
Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25146.
×
Page 38
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The original charter of the Space Science Board was established in June 1958, three months before the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) opened its doors. The Space Science Board and its successor, the Space Studies Board (SSB), have provided expert external and independent scientific and programmatic advice to NASA on a continuous basis from NASA's inception until the present. The SSB has also provided such advice to other executive branch agencies, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Department of Defense, as well as to Congress.

Space Studies Board Annual Report 2017 covers a message from the chair of the SSB, David N. Spergel. This report also explains the origins of the Space Science Board, how the Space Studies Board functions today, the SSB's collaboration with other National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine units, assures the quality of the SSB reports, acknowledges the audience and sponsors, and expresses the necessity to enhance the outreach and improve dissemination of SSB reports. This report will be relevant to a full range of government audiences in civilian space research - including NASA, NSF, NOAA, USGS, and the Department of Energy, as well members of the SSB, policy makers, and researchers.

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