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Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review (2018)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
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B

Committee Biographical Information

LOUISE M. PROCKTER, Co-Chair, is the director of the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) in Houston, Texas, which is run for NASA’s Planetary Division by the nonprofit Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The LPI provides scientific leadership and services to NASA and the broad planetary science community. Dr. Prockter has been involved in robotic planetary missions throughout her career. She served as an imaging team associate on the Galileo and Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) missions; was a deputy project scientist and co-investigator on the MESSENGER mission; was a deputy project scientist for the Europa Clipper mission, and is currently a co-investigator on that mission’s camera team. Dr. Prockter earned her Ph.D. in planetary geology from Brown University. Her current scientific research focuses on the geomorphology and structural tectonics of icy satellites and other solar system bodies. Dr. Prockter has participated in numerous advisory panels within the National Academies—including the Committee for Planetary Exploration (COMPLEX), the Space Studies Board, and the Planetary Decadal Survey—as well as the NASA Advisory Council’s Planetary Science Subcommittee. She is a fellow of the Geological Society of America.

JOSEPH H. ROTHENBERG, Co-Chair, is an independent consultant. He has more than 52 years of space program management and engineering experience. He retired from Google, where he was the director of engineering for the Terra Bella (formerly Skybox) Remote Sensing Satellite division. Prior to joining Google he was president of Universal Space Network. Mr. Rothenberg retired from NASA in 2001 where he served in a number of positions including NASA’s associate administrator for space flight and director of the Goddard Space Flight Center. Mr. Rothenberg has extensive NASA program management experience and is widely recognized for leading the Hubble Space Telescope’s first Servicing Mission. Mr. Rothenberg has a B.S. in engineering science and a M.S. in management engineering from C.W. Post College of Long Island University. He has served on the National Academies Committee on NASA’s Beyond Einstein Program: An Architecture for Implementation, the Committee to Review Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies, the Committee on Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Committee on Human Spaceflight Crew Operations. He is a national associate of the National Academies.

DAVID A. BEARDEN is senior strategist in the Innovation Foundry, Office of Formulation at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Dr. Bearden leads teams to develop advanced concepts across JPL’s mission directorates: Astrophysics, Solar System, Earth Science, and Mars. Dr. Bearden serves on standing review and other review

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
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boards for NASA including the recent Astrophysics Large-concept Review Team (LRT) charged with reviewing the pre-decadal large observatory concepts being developed in advance of the next Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Dr. Bearden has considerable expertise concerning the issues, risks, and potential solutions in balancing benefit, cost, and risk across a broad array of space systems application areas including science missions, human spaceflight, remote sensing, telecommunications, missile defense, launch, and operations. Dr. Bearden is a nationally recognized program management and cost analysis expert and has over 30 years of technical and management experience in the acquisition and development of advanced technology space systems. He led the team that supported the last round of the decadal surveys using the cost and technical evaluation (CATE) process. Prior to joining JPL, Dr. Bearden was general manager of the NASA & Civil Space Division at The Aerospace Corporation, where he was responsible for management and technical leadership of the company’s support to NASA headquarters and centers as well as civil space agencies. Dr. Bearden had corporate responsibility for proposal preparation, project planning, and project delivery to NASA and civil space programs. Dr. Bearden led a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers that developed and sustained technical consulting business from NASA, NOAA, other civil agencies, commercial companies, and international space clients.

Dr. Bearden led the Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Analysis of Alternatives, which earned him the 2006 Aerospace Corporation’s President’s Award. In summer 2009, he led the team that served as the technical arm of the Augustine Committee assessing the future of human spaceflight. Dr. Bearden has led various mission studies, including the Lunar Robotic Exploration Architecture and Mars Sample Return studies. Dr. Bearden was among the recipients of a NASA Group Achievement Award for Technical Support to Aquarius/SAC-D Standing Review Board. In 2015 Dr. Bearden was selected as an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and in 2017, was elected a member of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA). Dr. Bearden was awarded a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. He has served on the Board of Trustees for the International Space University (ISU). He has served on multiple National Academies’ committees: the Planetary Mid-decadal Review, the Assessment of Large Strategic Missions, Survey of Surveys: Lessons Learned from the Decadal Survey Process, the Committee on Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Cooperation on Space and Earth Science Missions, and the Committee on NASA’s Beyond Einstein Program: An Architecture for Implementation.

SCOTT BOLTON is an associate vice president at the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio, Texas. Dr. Bolton also serves as the principal investigator for the Juno mission, a project within NASA’s New Frontiers Program. The Juno spacecraft is currently orbiting Jupiter. Dr. Bolton has more than 36 years’ experience in the field of aerospace and space science. Prior to becoming director at SwRI, Dr. Bolton was a senior scientist and manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for over 25 years. During his tenure at SwRI, Dr. Bolton oversaw the launches of New Horizons and IBEX, the selection of Juno, the confirmation of MMS, and the delivery of hardware for a number of non-NASA programs related to national security. Dr. Bolton also manages the coordination and development of future NASA mission and instrumentation proposals for the Space Science and Engineering Division at SwRI, managing the strategic plan, partnership selection, and proposal quality. He has held a wide range of positions, including those associated with mission design, engineering, scientific research, and program management for various space missions related to NASA’s exploration of Earth, the solar system, and the fields of astrophysics and space physics. Dr. Bolton received his Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of California, Berkeley.

BARBARA A. COHEN is a planetary scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Cohen serves within NASA representing science interests and capabilities within human spaceflight planning. She is a principal investigator on multiple NASA research projects, a member of the mission teams operating the Opportunity and Curiosity rovers on Mars, and the principal investigator for Lunar Flashlight, a lunar CubeSat mission. Dr. Cohen is also the principal investigator for the Mid-Atlantic Space Flight Center Noble Gas Research Laboratory (MNGRL) and is developing flight versions of geochronology techniques for use on future planetary landers and rovers. She has participated in the Antarctic Search for Meteorites (ANSMET) over four seasons, where she helped recover more than a thousand pristine samples for the U.S. collection, and asteroid 6186 Barbcohen is named after her.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
×

She received her Ph.D. in planetary sciences from the University of Arizona. Dr. Cohen served on the National Academies’ Planetary Science Decadal Survey: Inner Planets Panel and the Committee on the Scientific Context for the Exploration of the Moon.

ANDREW M. DAVIS is professor and chair in the Department of the Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago, where he also serves as professor of geological sciences at the Enrico Fermi Institute. Dr. Davis’s primary research interests are in isotopic and chemical analysis of (1) presolar, circumstellar dust grains recovered from meteorites to study stellar nucleosynthesis, (2) refractory inclusions within primitive meteorites to study the earliest history of the solar system, and (3) samples of cometary and interstellar dust, the Sun, and asteroids returned to Earth by the Stardust, Genesis, and Hayabusa spacecraft (and in future, OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa 2). He served for many years on the Curation and Analysis Planning Team for Extraterrestrial Materials (CAPTEM), chairing the Genesis Sample Allocation Subcommittee and serving on the Stardust Sample Allocation Subcommittee. Over the past few years, the Chicago Instrument for Laser Ionization (CHILI) has been built in his laboratory. The pyroxene mineral davisite [CaScAlSiO6] and the asteroid 6947 Andrewdavis are named for him. Dr. Davis earned his Ph.D. in geochemistry from Yale University.

MELINDA DARBY DYAR is the Kennedy-Schelkunoff professor and chair of astronomy at Mount Holyoke College and a senior scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Her research includes study of both extraterrestrial (lunar and meteorites, including those from Mars) and terrestrial rock types. Dr. Dyar served as a participating scientist on the Mars Science Laboratory mission. She is deputy principal investigator of the Institute for Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration based at Stony Brook University and a member of three other Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institutes at Brown University, the Applied Physics Laboratory, and the Planetary Science Institute. Dr. Dyar has 36 years of experience in the field of mineral spectroscopy, including optical, FTIR, LIBS, Mössbauer, x-ray absorption (XAS, synchrotron), and many other types of spectroscopy. She received her Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Dyar is a fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America and was the 2016 recipient of the J.K. Gilbert award from the Geological Society of America for her outstanding contributions to the solution of a fundamental problem(s) of planetary geology.

ALAN W. HARRIS is a research scientist with MoreData! Inc., which takes and interprets photometric observations of asteroids and is funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF). He has served as a member of selection and review committees for NASA Discovery mission calls. Dr. Harris retired from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory after 28 years of service as a senior research scientist and as a principal investigator of NASA-sponsored research grants. He has served on numerous proposal and program review panels for NASA and NSF, as well as international committees. For example, although not a formal member of the National Academies Committee to Review Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies, he presented at one of the meetings and provided expert review of the final report. Dr. Harris received his Ph.D. in earth and space sciences from the University of California, Los Angeles.

AMANDA R. HENDRIX is a senior scientist with the Planetary Science Institute. Dr. Hendrix’s research interests focus on moons and small bodies in the solar system to understand composition, activity, and evolution. Dr. Hendrix has led programs and published results in the Hubble Space Telescope, JSDAP, PG&G, OPR, LASER, and CDAP programs, among others. Dr. Hendrix is a co-investigator on the Cassini UVIS and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter LAMP teams, was a co-investigator on the Galileo UVS team, and served as the Cassini deputy project scientist. In 2016 she published a book (Penguin/Random House) with co-author Charles Wohlforth, Beyond Earth: Our Path to a New Home in the Planets, a discussion of the technological, medical, and social hurdles to overcome in considering a human space establishment in the outer solar system. She earned her Ph.D. in aerospace engineering with an emphasis in planetary science from the University of Colorado. Dr. Hendrix is a co-chair of the Roadmaps to Ocean Worlds group, serves as a steering committee member of the Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG), and is a member of the Hubble Space Telescope Europa Advisory committee.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
×

BRUCE M. JAKOSKY is a professor in the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is also an associate director for science at LASP. Dr. Jakosky’s research interests are in the geology of planetary surfaces, the evolution of the martian atmosphere and climate, the potential for life on Mars and elsewhere, and the philosophical and societal issues in astrobiology. He has been involved with the Viking, Solar Mesosphere Explorer, Clementine, Mars Observer, Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Science Laboratory, and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft missions. Dr. Jakosky headed the University of Colorado’s team in the NASA Astrobiology Institute for more than 10 years. He also is the principal investigator of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission to Mars. He has published nearly 200 papers in the refereed scientific literature, and has authored or co-authored a number of books, including The Search for Life on Other Planets and Science, Society, and the Search for Life in the Universe. Dr. Jakosky received his Ph.D. in planetary science and geophysics from the California Institute of Technology. He has served on the National Academies Committee on Origins and Evolution of Life and the Committee on Astrobiology Strategy for the Exploration of Mars.

MARGARET G. KIVELSON is a professor of space physics, emerita, in the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences and the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a research professor at the University of Michigan. Dr. Kivelson’s scientific interests are magnetospheric plasma physics of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, interaction of flowing plasmas with planets and moons, and ultra-low frequency waves. She is currently a co-investigator on the THEMIS and Europa missions, and a collaborator on the fluxgate magnetometer on Cassini. She is the recipient of the Alfven Medal of the European Geophysical Union and the Fleming Medal of the American Geophysical Union. Dr. Kivelson earned her Ph.D. in physics from Radcliffe College. She has served on the National Academies Committee on NASA Science Mission Extensions, the Plasma Science Committee, and the Committee on Planetary Science Decadal Survey: 2013-2022. Dr. Kivelson is a participant on the Europa flyby mission magnetosphere science team, but she is not involved in decision making or as an advocate for the instrument.

SCOTT L. MURCHIE is the Planetary Exploration Group supervisor in the Space Exploration Sector of The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). His research focuses on the stratigraphy and formation of planetary crusts, how planetary crusts incorporate and are modified by volatiles, and the composition and geologic processes of asteroids and planetary moons. Dr. Murchie’s research combines imaging and spectroscopy, synergistically and where possible together with measurements of elemental composition, for multidisciplinary measurement approaches. Currently, he is a co-investigator on the Mapping Imaging Spectrometer for Europa (MISE). As a co-investigator on MESSENGER, he helped to conceive the overall mission concept, and played a leading role in design of the imaging and reflectance spectroscopic investigations of Mercury’s crustal composition, stratigraphy, and evolution. As principal investigator of the CRISM imaging spectrometer on MRO, he led the design and implementation of the investigation, analysis of the data, and dissemination of user-friendly CRISM data products, which have supported over 600 refereed publications to date. For these efforts he received the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. Dr. Murchie received his Ph.D. in geological and earth science from Brown University.

JUAN PEREZ-MERCADER is a senior research fellow and principal investigator in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University. His current research interests are in the experimental physics and chemistry of self-organization, information in non-equilibrium physico-chemical systems, chemical computation, origins of life, theoretical biology, and life detection in planetary environments. Dr. Perez-Mercader previously served as the first director of Spain’s Centro de Astrobiologia (CAB), which he founded in 1998 in association with the NASA Astrobiology Institute. He is also Profesor de Investigación in Spain’s National Research Council (CSIC) and an external faculty member at the Santa Fe Institute. He has authored about 150 research papers published in recognized journals and five books, including a best-selling popular science book in Spanish. Dr. Perez-Mercader has two patents in biotechnology and one on chemical computers. He is also an elected member of the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
×

International Academy of Astronautics and of the European Academy of Sciences and Arts. Dr. Perez-Mercader is the recipient of many honors and distinctions. Among these are one of the prizes given in 1994 by the Gravity Research Foundation, the European Physical Society Lecturer for the 2005 Celebrations in Bern of Einstein’s 1905 work there, and the NASA Public Service Medal (NASA’s highest honor to a non-NASA employee) and NASA’s Group Achievement Award for exceptional achievement on REMS. He received his Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the City College of New York. Dr. Perez-Mercader has served on the National Academies Committee on the Review of NASA’s Planetary Science Division’s Restructured Research and Analysis Programs.

MARK P. SAUNDERS is an independent consultant. Since retiring from NASA in December 2008, he has been consulting to various NASA offices providing program/project management and systems engineering expertise. This effort has included support to the Office of Chief Engineer, the Office of Independent Program and Cost Evaluation, the Mars Program, and the Science Office for Mission Assessments (at Langley Research Center [LaRC]). Mr. Saunders has participated in the rewriting of NASA’s policy on program/project management; advised and supported the agency’s independent program/project review process; and supported the review of various programs and projects. At NASA headquarters he served as director of the independent program assessment office, where he was responsible for enabling the independent review of the Agency’s programs and projects at life cycle milestones to ensure the highest probability of mission success. At NASA’s LaRC he was initially the deputy director and then the director of the Space Access and Exploration Program Office (SAEPO), and had the responsibility for planning, directing, and coordinating the center’s research, technology, and flight programs for advanced aerospace transportation and human/robotic exploration systems. Prior to this he was the manager of Exploration Programs and led all LaRC space exploration research and development activities supporting the agency’s Aerospace Technology (AST), Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS), and Space Science Enterprises (SSE). At the Office of Space Science, Mr. Saunders served as program manager for the Discovery Program, and at the Space Station Freedom Program operations he served as special assistant to the deputy director. He received the Presidential Meritorious Rank Award, the Outstanding Performance award, and the NASA Outstanding Leadership medal. He earned his B.A. at the Georgia Institute of Technology in industrial engineering. Mr. Saunders has served on the National Academies Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Sciences.

SUZANNE SMREKAR is a senior research scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Dr. Smrekar is a geophysicist with a focus on terrestrial planet evolution. She is currently the deputy principal investigator for the InSight Mission to Mars, and for InSights’ Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package. Her research includes modeling of tectonic, volcanic, and convective processes, as well as analysis of gravity, topography, radar, imaging, and spectral data. Dr. Smrekar has served on various NASA science definition teams, working groups, and review panels, as well as on scientific organizing committees and as an editor for books and journal special issues. She has led the development of instrumentation to measure planetary heat flow, and has had science leadership roles on several planetary missions. She received her Ph.D. in geophysics from Southern Methodist University.

DAVID J. STEVENSON is the Marvin L. Goldberger professor of planetary science at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Stevenson’s research primary focus is on theoretical planetary science, including Earth, large moons, and planets in other solar systems. His research applies condensed matter physics and fluid dynamics to data from space missions, including NASA’s Galileo, Cassini, and Juno missions. Dr. Stevenson previously served as both the chairman of the GPS Division and the chairman of the faculty at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Stevenson was elected as a foreign associate of the National Academies. He is also a fellow of the AGU, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Royal Society in London. He is a winner of the DPS (AAS) Urey Prize, the AGU Whipple Award, and the Hess Medal. Dr. Stevenson received his Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Cornell University. He served on the Astro2010 Panel on Planetary Systems and Star Formation, the Committee on Planetary Science Decadal Survey: 2013-2022, the Panel on Solar System Exploration, and the Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Science.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
×

STAFF

DWAYNE A. DAY, Study Director, a senior program officer for the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, has a Ph.D. in political science from the George Washington University. Dr. Day joined the National Academies as a program officer for the Space Studies Board. He served as an investigator for the Columbia Accident Investigation Board in 2003, was on the staff of the Congressional Budget Office, and worked for the Space Policy Institute at the George Washington University. He has also performed consulting for the Science and Technology Policy Institute of the Institute for Defense Analyses and for the U.S. Air Force. He is the author of Lightning Rod: A History of the Air Force Chief Scientist and editor of several books, including a history of the CORONA reconnaissance satellite program. He has held Guggenheim and Verville fellowships at the National Air and Space Museum and was an associate editor of the German spaceflight magazine Raumfahrt Concrete, in addition to writing for such publications as Novosti Kosmonavtiki (Russia), Spaceflight, Space Chronicle (United Kingdom), and the Washington Post. He has served as study director for over a dozen National Academies’ reports, including 3-D Printing in Space (2013), NASA’s Strategic Direction and the Need for a National Consensus (2012), Vision and Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022 (2011), Preparing for the High Frontier—The Role and Training of NASA Astronauts in the Post-Space Shuttle Era (2011), Defending Planet Earth: Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies (2010), Grading NASA’s Solar System Exploration Program: A Midterm Review (2008), and Opening New Frontiers in Space: Choices for the Next New Frontiers Announcement of Opportunity (2008).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
×
Page 130
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
×
Page 131
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
×
Page 132
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
×
Page 133
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
×
Page 134
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Visions into Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022: A Midterm Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25186.
×
Page 135
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In spring 2011 the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine produced a report outlining the next decade in planetary sciences. That report, titled Vision and Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022, and popularly referred to as the “decadal survey,” has provided high-level prioritization and guidance for NASA’s Planetary Science Division. Other considerations, such as budget realities, congressional language in authorization and appropriations bills, administration requirements, and cross-division and cross-directorate requirements (notably in retiring risk or providing needed information for the human program) are also necessary inputs to how NASA develops its planetary science program.

In 2016 NASA asked the National Academies to undertake a study assessing NASA’s progress at meeting the objectives of the decadal survey. After the study was underway, Congress passed the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Transition Authorization Act of 2017 which called for NASA to engage the National Academies in a review of NASA’s Mars Exploration Program. NASA and the Academies agreed to incorporate that review into the midterm study. That study has produced this report, which serves as a midterm assessment and provides guidance on achieving the goals in the remaining years covered by the decadal survey as well as preparing for the next decadal survey, currently scheduled to begin in 2020.

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