National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 5 Reflecting on the Day's Presentations
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Health Literacy and Older Adults: Reshaping the Landscape: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25188.
×

References

AARP Foundation. 2014. Framework for isolation in adults over 50. http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/aarp_foundation/2012_PDFs/AARP-Foundation-Isolation-Framework-Report.pdf (accessed April 4, 2018).

Baker, D. W., J. A. Gazmararian, J. Sudano, and M. Patterson. 2000. The association between age and health literacy among elderly persons. The Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 55(6):S368–S374.

Baker, D. W., J. A. Gazmararian, M. V. Williams, T. Scott, R. M. Parker, D. Green, J. Ren, and J. Peel. 2002. Functional health literacy and the risk of hospital admission among Medicare managed care enrollees. American Journal of Public Health 92(8):1278–1283.

Brougham, R. R. 2009. New directions in aging research: Health and cognition. New York: Nova Biomedical Books.

Chesser, A. K., N. Keene Woods, K. Smothers, and N. Rogers. 2016. Health literacy and older adults: A systematic review. Gerontology & Geriatric Medicine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5119904 (accessed April 23, 2018).

Cutilli, C. C., and C. T. Schaefer. 2011. Case studies in geriatric health literacy. Orthopaedic Nursing 30(4):281–287.

Favreault, M., and J. Dey. 2016. Long-term services and supports for older Americans: Risks and financing research brief. Washington, DC: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Department of Health and Human Services.

Forman, D. E., A. D. Berman, C. H. McCabe, D. S. Baim, and J. Y. Wei. 1992. PTCA in the elderly: The “young-old” versus the “old-old.” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 40(1):19–22.

Freedman, V. A., and B. C. Spillman. 2014a. Disability and care needs among older Americans. Milbank Quarterly 92(3):509–541.

Freedman, V. A., and B. C. Spillman. 2014b. Disability and care needs of older Americans: An analysis of the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends study. Washington, DC: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Department of Health and Human Services.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Health Literacy and Older Adults: Reshaping the Landscape: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25188.
×

Gualtieri, L., S. Rosenbluth, and J. Phillips. 2016. Can a free wearable activity tracker change behavior? The impact of trackers on adults in a physician-led wellness group. JMIR Research Protocols 5(4):e237.

Hanoch, Y., and T. Rice. 2006. Can limiting choice increase social welfare? The elderly and health insurance. Milbank Quarterly 84(1):37–73.

IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2004. Health literacy: A prescription to end confusion. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: https://doi.org/10.17226/10883.

IOM. 2008. Retooling for an aging America: Building the health care workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: https://doi.org/10.17226/12089.

Kobayashi, L. C., J. Wardle, M. S. Wolf, and C. von Wagner. 2016. Aging and functional health literacy: A systematic review and meta-analysis. The Journals of Gerontology: Series B 71(3):445–457.

Kopera-Frye, K. 2016. Health literacy among older adults. New York: Springer Publishing Co.

Kuye, I. O., R. G. Frank, and J. McWilliams. 2013. Cognition and take-up of subsidized drug benefits by Medicare beneficiaries. JAMA Internal Medicine 173(12):1100–1107.

Lindland, E., M. Fond, A. Haydon, and N. Kendall-Taylor. 2015. Gauging aging: Mapping the gaps between expert and public understandings of aging in America. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute.

Linnan, L., S. B. Thomas, H. D’Angelo, and Y. Ferguson. 2012. African American barbershops and beauty salons: An innovative approach to reducing health disparities through community building and health education. In Community organizing and community building for health and welfare. 3rd edition, edited by M. Minkler. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

Morris, N. S., C. D. MacLean, L. D. Chew, and B. Littenberg. 2006. The single item literacy screener: Evaluation of a brief instrument to identify limited reading ability. BMC Family Practice 7(1):21.

NASEM (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine). 2016. Families caring for an aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: https://doi.org/10.17226/23606.

O’Neil, M., and A. Haydon. 2015. Aging, agency, and attribution of responsibility: Shifting public discourse about older adults. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute.

Paccagnella, M. 2016. Age, ageing and skills: Results from the Survey of Adult Skills. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 132. Paris, France: OECD Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1787/5jm0q1n38lvc-en (accessed June 19, 2018).

Sorensen, K., S. Van den Broucke, J. Fullam, G. Doyle, J. Pelikan, Z. Slonska, and H. Brand. 2012. Health literacy and public health: A systematic review and integration of definitions and models. BMC Public Health 12:80.

Sweetland, J., A. Volmert, and M. O’Neil. 2017. Finding the frame: An empirical approach to reframing aging and ageism. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute.

Thomas, S. B., S. C. Quinn, J. Butler, C. S. Fryer, and M. A. Garza. 2011. Toward a fourth generation of disparities research to achieve health equity. Annual Review of Public Health 32:399–416.

UN DESA (United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs). 2005. World population prospects: The 2004 revision. http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/WPP2004/WPP2004_Volume3.htm (accessed April 23, 2018).

Victor, R. G., K. Lynch, N. Li, C. Blyler, E. Muhammad, J. Handler, J. Brettler, M. Rashid, B. Hsu, D. Foxx-Drew, N. Moy, A. E. Reid, and R. M. Elashoff. 2018. A cluster-randomized trial of blood-pressure reduction in Black barbershops. New England Journal of Medicine 378(14):1291–1301.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Health Literacy and Older Adults: Reshaping the Landscape: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25188.
×

Windh, J., A. Tumlinson, J. Mulcahy, J. L. Wolff, A. Willink, J. D. Kasper, and G. L. Atkins. 2017. Medicare spending on older adults who need long-term services and supports. Research Brief. Washington, DC: Long-Term Quality Alliance. http://www.ltqa.org/wpcontent/themes/ltqaMain/custom/images//Medicare-Spending-for-Older-Adults-WhoNeed-LTSS_Research-Brief_Final.pdf (accessed April 23, 2018).

Wolff, J. L., and C. M. Boyd. 2015. A look at person- and family-centered care among older adults: Results from a national survey [corrected]. Journal of General Internal Medicine 30(10):1497–1504.

Wolff, J. L., and D. L. Roter. 2008. Hidden in plain sight: Medical visit companions as a resource for vulnerable older adults. Archives of Internal Medicine 168(13):1409–1415.

Wolff, J. L., and D. L. Roter. 2011. Family presence in routine medical visits: A meta-analytical review. Social Science and Medicine 72(6):823–831.

Wolff, J. L., and D. L. Roter. 2012. Older adults’ mental health function and patient-centered care: Does the presence of a family companion help or hinder communication? Journal of General Internal Medicine 27(6):661–668.

Wolff, J. L., and B. Spillman. 2014. Older adults receiving assistance with physician visits and prescribed medications and their family caregivers: Prevalence, characteristics, and hours of care. Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 69(Suppl 1):S65–S72.

Wolff, J. L., C. M. Boyd, L. N. Gitlin, M. L. Bruce, and D. L. Roter. 2012. Going it together: Persistence of older adults’ accompaniment to physician visits by a family companion. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 60(1):106–112.

Wolff, J. L., D. L. Roter, J. Barron, C. M. Boyd, B. Leff, T. E. Finucane, J. J. Gallo, P. V. Rabins, D. L. Roth, and L. N. Gitlin. 2014. A tool to strengthen the older patient–companion partnership in primary care: Results from a pilot study. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 62(2):312–319.

Wolff, J. L., M. L. Clayman, P. Rabins, M. A. Cook, and D. L. Roter. 2015. An exploration of patient and family engagement in routine primary care visits. Health Expectations 18(2):188–198.

Wolff, J. L., A. Berger, D. Clarke, J. A. Green, R. Stametz, C. Yule, and J. D. Darer. 2016a. Patients, care partners, and shared access to the patient portal: Online practices at an integrated health system. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 23(6):1150–1158.

Wolff, J. L., J. D. Darer, and K. L. Larsen. 2016b. Family caregivers and consumer health information technology. Journal of General Internal Medicine 31(1):117–121.

Wolff, J. L., J. D. Darer, A. Berger, D. Clarke, J. A. Green, R. A. Stametz, T. Delbanco, and J. Walker. 2017a. Inviting patients and care partners to read doctors’ notes: OpenNotes and shared access to electronic medical records. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 24(e1):e166–e172.

Wolff, J. L., Y. Guan, C. M. Boyd, J. Vick, H. Amjad, D. L. Roth, L. N. Gitlin, and D. L. Roter. 2017b. Examining the context and helpfulness of family companion contributions to older adults’ primary care visits. Patient Education and Counseling 100(3):487–494.

Zizza, C. A., K. J. Ellison, and C. M. Wernette. 2009. Total water intakes of community-living middle-old and oldest-old adults. The Journals of Gerontology: Series A 64A(4):481–486.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Health Literacy and Older Adults: Reshaping the Landscape: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25188.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Health Literacy and Older Adults: Reshaping the Landscape: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25188.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Health Literacy and Older Adults: Reshaping the Landscape: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25188.
×
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Health Literacy and Older Adults: Reshaping the Landscape: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25188.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Health Literacy and Older Adults: Reshaping the Landscape: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25188.
×
Page 70
Next: Appendix A Workshop Agenda »
Health Literacy and Older Adults: Reshaping the Landscape: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $60.00 Buy Ebook | $48.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Adults age 65 and older make up the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population. At the same time, the complexity of health care delivery continues to grow, creating challenges that are magnified for older adults, given that age is one of the highest correlates of low health literacy. This creates a shared obligation between health care and the health care team to use the principles, tools, and practices of health literacy so that patients and families of older adults can more easily navigate discussions related to chronic disease, polypharmacy, long-term care, palliative care, insurance complexities, the social determinants of health, and other factors that create challenges for older adults, particularly among underserved populations nationwide.

To gain a better understanding of the health communication challenges among older adults and their professional and family caregivers and how those challenges affect the care older adults receive, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Health Literacy convened a 1-day public workshop featuring presentations and discussions that examined the effect of low health literacy on the health of older adults. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!