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Fostering Healthy Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Development in Children and Youth: A National Agenda (2019)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fostering Healthy Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Development in Children and Youth: A National Agenda. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25201.
×
Page 291
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fostering Healthy Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Development in Children and Youth: A National Agenda. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25201.
×
Page 292
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fostering Healthy Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Development in Children and Youth: A National Agenda. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25201.
×
Page 293
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fostering Healthy Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Development in Children and Youth: A National Agenda. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25201.
×
Page 294
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fostering Healthy Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Development in Children and Youth: A National Agenda. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25201.
×
Page 295

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Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs Appendix C Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Thomas F. Boat, M.D. (Chair) is the dean emeritus of the College of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati and a professor of pediatrics in the Division of Pulmonary Medicine at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Earlier, he was the director of the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Research Foundation and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. More recently, he has worked at local and national levels to improve child health research efforts, subspecialty training, and clinical care. He has a special interest in issues posed by children’s mental health for pediatric care, research and training, and he is working in Cincinnati and nationally to promote children’s behavioral health. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. He is also a member of the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs and served as president of its board of directors. He has also served as chair of the American Board of Pediatrics and as president of both the Society for Pediatric Research and the American Pediatric Society. He has an M.D. in pediatric pulmonology from the University of Iowa. William A. Aldridge II, is an advanced implementation specialist at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is also an implementation science strategist at the Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center at Penn State University and serves on the board of directors of the National Prevention Science Coalition. In addition, he provides active implementation support for the California child welfare system's Core Practice Model and is a collaborating scientist at the Parenting & Family Research Center at the University of South Carolina. His work includes intensive technical assistance and evaluation research on the active implementation and scale-up of evidence-based prevention and well-being strategies in community settings and state, regional, and national service systems. He is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Society for Prevention Research, and the Society for Implementation Research Collaboration. He has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and he is a licensed psychologist in North Carolina. Alix Beatty (Study Director) is a senior program officer with the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE). She previously served as the study director for an evaluation of the public schools of the District of Columbia. Her other work in DBASSE has covered a wide range of topics, including consensus studies and workshops on educational assessment and equity, child and adolescent education and development, public health, climate change, and a decadal survey of social and behavioral sciences for national security. Prior to joining DBASSE, she worked on the National Assessment of Educational Progress and College Board programs at the Educational Testing Service. She has a B.A. in philosophy from Williams College and an M.A. in history from Bryn Mawr College. Anthony Biglan is a senior scientist at the Oregon Research Institute. He conducts research on the development and prevention of child and adolescent problem behavior, focusing on comprehensive interventions that have the potential to prevent the entire range of child and adolescent problems. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated 291   

Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs Appendix C with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use, high-risk sexual behavior, and antisocial behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use, high-risk sexual behavior, antisocial behavior, and reading failure through family, school, and community-wide interventions. He is a former president of the Society for Prevention Research. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D., both in social psychology, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Richard Catalano, Jr., is the Bartley Dobb professor for the study and prevention of violence in the School of Social Work, a research affiliate at the Center for Studies in Demography & Ecology, and the cofounder of the Social Development Research Group, all at the University of Washington. His work focuses on discovering risk and protective factors for positive and problem behavior, designing and evaluating programs to address these factors, and using this knowledge to understand and improve prevention service systems in states and communities. He is the codeveloper of the Social Development Model; several parenting programs, including “Guiding Good Choices;” the school-based program, “Raising Healthy Children;” and the community prevention approach, “Communities That Care.” He is a recipient of the award of excellence from the National Prevention Network, a practitioner organization, and the presidential award from the Society for Prevention Research, a scientific organization. He has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin and a master’s degree and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington, all in sociology. Frances A. Champagne is a professor in the Department of Psychology at The University of Texas at Austin and an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Columbia University. As psychologist and behavioral neuroscientist, her research in in the fields of molecular neuroscience, maternal behavior, and the epigenetic effects of early developmental experiences. Her main research interest concerns how genetic and environmental factors in early life interact to shape behavioral development and the consequences of epigenetic variation for the transmission of traits across generations. She is a recipient of Director’s New Innovator Award of the National Institutes of Health. She has a B.A. in psychology from Queen’s University in Canada and an M.Sc. in psychiatry and a Ph.D. in neuroscience from McGill University. Jennifer Frank is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, Counseling, and Special Education in the College of Education at Penn State University. Her work focuses on developing and evaluating school-based prevention practices that modify the social ecology of risk (school-family-peer-individual factors) that gives rise to high-incidence disabilities and preparing the next generation of school-based professionals to implement high- quality prevention practices in school settings. Her work strives to be interdisciplinary and draws from diverse theoretical and methodological approaches to understand the determinants of risk and resilience. The ultimate goal of her teaching, research, and service activities is to create optimal social contexts to support academic learning that are sustainable in real-world settings. Her current research interests include: school-based prevention, positive behavior supports, innovative statistical and experimental methods to validate evidence-based interventions, social- emotional learning, and mindfulness-based interventions. She has a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. 292   

Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs Appendix C Patricia Jennings is a professor in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Special Education at the University of Virginia. She studies the social and emotional dynamics of educational settings and develops and tests social and emotional learning curricula and interventions for students in pre-K through 12th-grade school settings. Her basic research covers social and emotional competencies, the life-span developmental effects of childhood trauma, and adult perception of stress and coping. She is particularly focused on applying mindfulness-based approaches to improving teacher and student emotional awareness and self-regulation and improving teaching and learning environments and using this research to improving pre-service teacher education at the pre-K and elementary levels. She is a recipient of the Cathy Kerr Award for Courageous and Compassionate Science by the Mind & Life Institute. She has a B.A. from Antioch College, an M.Ed. from St. Mary’s College, and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Davis. Sheryl Kataoka is professor-in-residence in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where she also serves as the training director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship. She is also an investigator with the UCLA Center for Health Services and Society, examining how schools and communities can support the emotional well-being of children and families. She is the site principal investigator for the Treatment and Services Adaptation Center for Resiliency, Hope and Wellness in Schools of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. She has a B.S. and an M.S. in health services research from UCLA and an M.D. from The George Washington University School of Medicine. She completed child psychiatry fellowship training at the UCLA Semel Institute. Kelly J. Kelleher is the ADS Professor of Innovation at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Dr. Kelleher is also Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health at The Ohio State University’s Colleges of Medicine and Public Health. As a pediatrician, his research interests focus on accessibility, effectiveness, and quality of health care services for children and their families, especially those affected by mental disorders, substance abuse, or violence. He has a long-standing interest in formal outcomes research for mental health and substance abuse services. He has an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health and an M.D. from The Ohio State University College of Medicine. Margaret Kelly serves as a senior program assistant on the Board of Children, Youth, and Families. Ms. Kelley has more than 20 years of experience working in the administrative field. She has worked for the private sector, federal government and nonprofit organizations to include American University, Catholic University, the Census Bureau, International Franchise Association, the Department of Defense and the University of the District of Columbia. Ms. Kelley has received numerous professional honors and awards throughout her career to include a Superior Performance of Customer Service Award; Sustained Superior Performance Cash Awards; Air Force Organizational Excellence Awards and Certificates of Appreciations. Erin Kellogg (Research Associate) is on the staff of the Board of Children, Youth, and Families. Prior to joining the board staff, she worked as a consultant for the Ohio Department of Medicaid on projects related to the state’s Medicaid waiver programs. She has also worked as a policy analyst for both the Children’s Defense Fund and Connecticut Voices for Children. She has an M.P.A. from The Ohio State University and an M.P.H. from the Yale School of Public Health. 293   

Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs Appendix C Grace Kolliesuah is chief of the Bureau of Children and Families in the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services. She oversees the implementation of Ohio’s comprehensive array of statewide behavioral health initiatives and services for children and families. She provides guidance and strategic direction to programs regarding planning, performance, and budgeting. She is also the principal investigator for several grants from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Previously, she served as the project director for a federal Healthy Start Project, Caring for 2 at Columbus Public Health and as a direct service child welfare supervisor and administrator with children protection agencies, serving medical fragile, abused, neglected, dependent, and delinquent children. She has a B.S. in business administration and an M.A. in urban studies and public administration from the University of Akron and a master’s in social work from The Ohio State University. She is a licensed social worker. Marguerita Lightfoot is a professor of medicine at the School of Medicine of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), as well as chief for the Division of Prevention Science and director of the Center for Prevention Studies and the UCSF Prevention Research Center. Her research focus is on improving the health and well-being of adolescents and young adults and on the development of efficacious interventions to reduce risk behaviors among vulnerable populations of adolescents. She conducts community-involved research that includes designing and implementing preventive interventions for delinquent adolescents, runaway and homeless youth, and youth living with HIV. She is particularly interested in developing cost-effective interventions that are easily translatable with utility in community settings, using new technologies. She has a Ph.D. and is a licensed psychotherapist. Tamar Mendelson is a Bloomberg Professor of American Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She has a joint appointment in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine, and she is co-leader of the risks to adolescent health focal area in the Bloomberg American Health Initiative. Her research addresses the development, evaluation, and implementation of prevention strategies to improve maternal and child mental health, with a focus on underserved urban populations. She focuses especially on the prevention of depression, anxiety, and trauma and the promotion of emotional and behavioral health among urban youth, with particular interest in the evaluation of mindfulness-based interventions. Her research adapts and tests evidence-based interventions so that they can be feasibly and sustainably embedded within systems that serve youth and families. She has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Duke University. Ricardo F. Muñoz is distinguished professor of clinical psychology at Palo Alto University. He is also the founding director of i4Health (Institute for International Internet Interventions for Health), which works to provide health and mental health services to underserved communities by providing them with mobile Apps and Internet accessible interventions and resources. Previously, he was a professor of psychology at the School of Medicine of the University of California, San Francisco, based at San Francisco General Hospital, where he served as chief psychologist. He specializes in the prevention and treatment of depression and in smoking cessation. He was inducted as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science “for distinguished contributions towards the prevention of major depression and the 294   

Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs Appendix C development of Internet interventions to improve mental health worldwide.” He has an A.B. in psychology from Stanford University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Oregon, Eugene. Myrna M. Weissman is chief of the Division of Epidemiology at New York State Psychiatric Institute and Diane Goldman Kemper family professor of epidemiology in psychiatry at Columbia University. Her current research is on understanding the rates and risks of mood and anxiety disorders using methods of epidemiology, genetics, neuroimaging, and the application of these findings to develop and test empirically based treatments and prevention interventions. She directs a three-generation study of families at high and low risk for depression who have been studied clinically for up to 25 years and who are participating in genetic and imaging studies. She also directed a multi-center study to determine the effects of maternal remission from depression on offspring, and she is participating in several studies of the genetics of mood and anxiety disorders. She also directs a study of psychiatric disorders in a poor minority patient population in African American churches. She has a Ph.D. in chronic disease epidemiology from the Yale University School of Medicine. 295   

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Healthy mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) development is a critical foundation for a productive adulthood. Much is known about strategies to support families and communities in strengthening the MEB development of children and youth, by promoting healthy development and also by preventing and mitigating disorder, so that young people reach adulthood ready to thrive and contribute to society. Over the last decade, a growing body of research has significantly strengthened understanding of healthy MEB development and the factors that influence it, as well as how it can be fostered. Yet, the United States has not taken full advantage of this growing knowledge base. Ten years later, the nation still is not effectively mitigating risks for poor MEB health outcomes; these risks remain prevalent, and available data show no significant reductions in their prevalence.

Fostering Healthy Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Development in Children and Youth: A National Agenda examines the gap between current research and achievable national goals for the next ten years. This report identifies the complexities of childhood influences and highlights the need for a tailored approach when implementing new policies and practices. This report provides a framework for a cohesive, multidisciplinary national approach to improving MEB health.

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