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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Engaging the Private-Sector Health Care System in Building Capacity to Respond to Threats to the Public's Health and National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25203.
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References

Auf der Heide, E., and J. Scanlon. 2007. The role of the health sector in planning and response. In Emergency management: Principles and practice for local government, 2nd ed., edited by W. J. Waugh, Jr., and K. Tierney. Washington, DC: ICMA Press.

Bachman, S. L., N. E. Demeter, G. G. Lee, R. V. Burke, T. W. Valente, and J. S. Upperman. 2014. The impact of trauma systems on disaster preparedness: A systematic review. Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine 15(4):296–308.

Berinato, S. 2003. All systems down. Computerworld, February 25, 2003.

Brown, J. B., M. R. Rosengart, T. R. Billiar, A. B. Peitzman, and J. L. Sperry. 2017. Distance matters: Effect of geographic trauma system resource organization on fatal motor vehicle collisions. Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 83(1):111–118.

Committee on Trauma and Trauma System Evaluation and Planning Committee. 2008. Regional trauma systems: Optimal elements, integration, and assessment, American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma: Systems consultation guide. Chicago, IL: American College of Surgeons.

Cudnik, M. T., C. D. Newgard, M. R. Sayre, and S. M. Steinberg. 2009. Level I versus level II trauma centers: An outcomes-based assessment. Journal of Trauma 66(5):1321–1326.

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DeSalvo, K. B., and S. Kertesz. 2007. Creating a more resilient safety net for persons with chronic disease: Beyond the “medical home.” Journal of General Internal Medicine 22(9):1377–1379.

Dobalian, A., R. Callis, and V. J. Davey. 2013. Evolution of the Veterans Health Administration’s role in emergency management since September 11, 2001. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness 5(S2):S182–S184.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Engaging the Private-Sector Health Care System in Building Capacity to Respond to Threats to the Public's Health and National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25203.
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Guenther, R., and J. Balbus. 2014. Primary protection: Enhancing health care resilience for a changing climate. Washington, DC: Department of Health and Human Services.

Halamka, J. 2008. The caregroup network outage. In Life as a Healthcare CIO. Boston, MA: BlogSpot.

HRSA (Health Resources and Services Administration). 2006. Model trauma system planning and evaluation. Washington, DC: Department of Health and Human Services.

Kadlec, R. 2018. ASPR’s new vision for a regional disaster health response system will help prepare nation for 21st century health security threats. In ASPR Blog. Washington, DC: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response.

MacKenzie, E. J., F. P. Rivara, G. J. Jurkovich, A. B. Nathens, K. P. Frey, B. L. Egleston, D. S. Salkever, and D. O. Scharfstein. 2006. A national evaluation of the effect of trauma-center care on mortality. New England Journal of Medicine 354(4):366–378.

Maxson, T., C. D. Mabry, M. J. Sutherland, R. D. Robertson, J. O. Booker, T. Collins, H. J. Spencer, C. F. Rinker, T. L. Sanddal, and N. D. Sanddal. 2017. Does the institution of a statewide trauma system reduce preventable mortality and yield a positive return on investment for taxpayers? Journal of the American College of Surgeons 224(4):489–499.

NAS and NRC (National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council). 1966. Accidental death and disability: The neglected disease of modern society. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

NASEM (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine). 2016. A national trauma care system: Integrating military and civilian trauma systems to achieve zero preventable deaths after injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Engaging the Private-Sector Health Care System in Building Capacity to Respond to Threats to the Public's Health and National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25203.
×
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Engaging the Private-Sector Health Care System in Building Capacity to Respond to Threats to the Public's Health and National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25203.
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Page 100
Next: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda »
Engaging the Private-Sector Health Care System in Building Capacity to Respond to Threats to the Public's Health and National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
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Disasters tend to cross political, jurisdictional, functional, and geographic boundaries. As a result, disasters often require responses from multiple levels of government and multiple organizations in the public and private sectors. This means that public and private organizations that normally operate independently must work together to mount an effective disaster response. To identify and understand approaches to aligning health care system incentives with the American public’s need for a health care system that is prepared to manage acutely ill and injured patients during a disaster, public health emergency, or other mass casualty event, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine hosted a 2-day public workshop on March 20 and 21, 2018. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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