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Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines (2018)

Chapter: Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
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Appendix IV

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Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year

2016–2018 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

May Berenbaum (Committee Chair, NAS)

Professor and head, department of entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Alan Boyle

Science editor

David K. Campbell

Professor of physics, electrical and computer engineering, and materials science and engineering, Boston University

Cornelia Dean

Science writer, The New York Times; writer-in-residence, Brown University

Baruch Fischhoff (NAS/NAM)

Howard Heinz University Professor, department of engineering and public policy, Institute for Politics and Strategy, Carnegie Mellon University

Laura Helmuth

Health, science, and environmental editor, The Washington Post

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

John H. Linehan (NAE)

Professor of biomedical engineering, Northwestern University

Charles C. Mann

Author; contributing correspondent, Science; contributing editor, The Atlantic

Joe Palca

Science correspondent, NPR

Nancy Shute

Editor-in-Chief, Science News

Dan Vergano

Science reporter, BuzzFeed News

2018 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 364 entries for work published or aired in 2017, the recipients of the 2018 awards were:

Book Winner

Dan Egan for The Death and Life of the Great Lakes (W.W. Norton & Co.) “An environmental, historical, and economic analysis, thoroughly researched and compellingly told, of America’s Great Lakes and the unintended consequences of short-sighted management decisions.”

Film/Radio/TV Winner

Emer Reynolds, John Murray, and Clare Stronge of Crossing the Line Productions and Sean B. Carroll and John Rubin of HHMI Tangled Bank Studios for “The Farthest—Voyager in Space”

“A fascinating and visually arresting telling of the story of NASA’s decades-long Voyager mission, showcasing the accounts of project participants in their own words and conveying the challenges of engineering problem-solving and the importance of teamwork in the discovery process.”

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Ann Gibbons, Emily Underwood, Jennifer Couzin-Frankel, John Bohannon, and deputy news editor Elizabeth Culotta of Science magazine

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

for a package of articles on human migration: “Busting Myths of Origin,” “The Pain of Exile,” “Battling Bias,” and “Restless Minds”

“A multidisciplinary and multidimensional examination of human migration, past and present, that is timely, cogent, and rich in stories that connect to the science in unexpected and thought-provoking ways.”

Online Winner

Nina Martin, Adriana Gallardo, and Annie Waldman of ProPublica and Renee Montagne of NPR for “Lost Mothers”

“A powerful series that illuminates the disproportionate incidence of maternal deaths in America, a shamefully neglected area of medicine, with scrupulous documentation and solid, heartbreaking storytelling.”

2017 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 290 entries for works published or aired in 2016, the recipients of the 2017 awards were:

Book Winner

Margot Lee Shetterly for Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race (William Morrow/HarperCollins Publishers)

“A hitherto little-known episode in the history of pioneering aerospace engineering and computing brought to light so engagingly that, along with the blockbuster movie it inspired, has had an unprecedented impact on the American public.”

Film/Radio/TV Winner

William Brangham, Jason Kane, and the team at PBS NewsHour with Jon Cohen at Science magazine for “The End of AIDS?,” produced in collaboration with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

“A compelling series that challenges long-held assumptions about the status of AIDS, with eye-opening reporting from six very different communities around the world.”

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

The Chicago Tribune’s Sam Roe, Karisa King, and Ray Long for the three-part series “Dangerous Doses”

“A masterful melding of data-mining, scientific exposition, and investigative journalism to expose a critical public health issue.”

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Online Winner

FiveThirtyEight’s Maggie Koerth-Baker, Ben Casselman, Anna Maria Barry-Jester, and Carl Bialik for “Gun Deaths in America”

“A balanced and fact-filled examination of an unfolding crisis, with compelling interactives that are meticulously attentive to data quality and statistics.”

2016 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 374 entries for works published or aired in 2015, the recipients of the 2016 awards were:

Book Winner

Deborah Cramer for The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic Journey, a beautifully written natural history of an imperiled bird that embeds evolutionary biology and systematics, marine ecology, physiology, natural history, paleontology, cultural history, and immunology in an absorbing, personal narrative.

Film/Radio/TV Winner

NPR’s Christopher Joyce and Alison Richards, with Bill McQuay of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, for the seven-part series “Close Listening: Decoding Nature Through Sound,” a powerful showcase for radio and for studying sound to understand nature.

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

David Ferry and Mother Jones for “The Fever: How the Government Put Tens of Thousands of People at Risk of a Deadly Disease,” a compelling account of a medical mystery and social injustice.

Online Winner

ProPublica’s Abrahm Lustgarten, Naveena Sadasivam, Al Shaw, and David Sleight for the six-part series “Killing the Colorado,” an outstanding interactive review of how decades of avarice, ignorance, and indifference led to an environmental disaster.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

2015 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

May Berenbaum (Committee Chair, NAS)

Professor and head, department of entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Alan Boyle

Science editor, NBC News Digital

David K. Campbell

Professor of physics, electrical and computer engineering, and materials science and engineering, Boston University

Cornelia Dean

Science writer, The New York Times; writer-in-residence, Brown University

Baruch Fischhoff (NAS, NAM)

Howard Heinz University Professor, department of engineering and public policy, Institute for Politics and Strategy, Carnegie Mellon University

Peggy Girshman

Editor

Laura Helmuth

Science and health editor, Slate

Mark Johnson

Health and science reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

John H. Linehan (NAE)

Professor of biomedical engineering, Northwestern University

Charles C. Mann

Author; contributing correspondent, Science; contributing editor, The Atlantic

Nancy Shute

Editor and blogger, NPR

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

2015 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 344 entries for works published or aired in 2014, the recipients of the 2015 awards were:

Book Winner

Mark Miodownik for Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World, a fascinating account of the extraordinary nature of the seemingly ordinary materials of modern-day life.

Film/Radio/TV Winner (for the first time, two recipients were selected in this category)

David Kaplan and Mark Levinson for “Particle Fever,” an engrossing, minute-by-minute diary of the roller-coaster nature of scientific discovery.

Michael Rosenfeld, David Dugan, and Neil Shubin for “Your Inner Fish” (HHMI/Tangled Bank Studios), an enthralling examination of the ancient animal ancestry in the fossil record and in our own bodies.

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Karen Bouffard, The Detroit News, for the series “Detroit Is the Deadliest City for Children,” a devastating portrayal of the complex factors underlying a city’s public health emergency.

Online Winner

The Reuters Team for the series “Water’s Edge: The Crisis of Rising Sea Levels,” a comprehensive investigation of a slow-motion environmental crisis with imaginative data visualization and interactive tools.

2014 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

May Berenbaum (Committee Chair, NAS)

Professor and head, department of entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Alan Boyle

Science editor, NBC News Digital

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

David K. Campbell

Professor of physics and electrical and computer engineering, Boston University

Cornelia Dean

Science writer, The New York Times; and writer-in-residence, Brown University

Peggy Girshman

Executive editor, Kaiser Health News

Mark Johnson

Health and science reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Laura Helmuth

Science and health editor, Slate

John H. Linehan (NAE)

Professor of biomedical engineering, Northwestern University

Charles C. Mann

Author; contributing correspondent, Science; contributing editor, The Atlantic

Gregory A. Petsko (NAS/IOM)

Arthur J. Mahon Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Cornell Medical College

Nancy Shute

Editor and blogger, NPR

2014 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 335 entries for works published or aired in 2013, the recipients of the 2014 awards were:

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Book Winner

Dan Fagin for Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation, for its masterful portrayal of the scientific process at work in a town facing environmental crisis.

Film/Radio/TV Winner

Rob Stein and NPR for the six-part radio series “Staying Healthy May Mean Learning to Love Our Microbes,” an enlightening exploration of the multifaceted dimensions of the human microbiome.

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Dennis Overbye, The New York Times, for “Chasing the Higgs,” for capturing the excitement of the scientific hunt for the Higgs boson.

Online Winner

Craig Welch, reporter, and Steve Ringman, photographer, at The Seattle Times for the series “Sea Change: The Pacific’s Perilous Turn,” a stunning multimedia investigation of the consequences of worldwide ocean acidification.

2013 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

May Berenbaum (Committee Chair, NAS)

Professor and head, department of entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Pablo J. Boczkowski

Professor and director, Program in Media, Technology and Society, Northwestern University

Alan Boyle

Science editor, NBC News Digital

David K. Campbell

Professor of physics, electrical and computer engineering, and materials science and engineering, Boston University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Cornelia Dean

Science writer, The New York Times; writer-in-residence, Brown University

Peggy Girshman

Executive editor, Kaiser Health News

Mark Johnson

Health and science reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

John H. Linehan (NAE)

Professor of biomedical engineering, Northwestern University

Charles C. Mann

Author; contributing correspondent, Science; contributing editor, The Atlantic

Gregory A. Petsko (NAS/IOM)

Arthur J. Mahon Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Cornell Medical College

Nancy Shute

Freelance

2013 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 291 entries for works published or aired in 2012, the recipients of the 2013 awards were:

Book Winner

David George Haskell for The Forest Unseen (Viking Penguin), for his exquisite portrait of nature’s universe, drawn from one tiny patch of forest.

Film/Radio/TV Winner

Joanne Silberner, David Baron, and Public Radio International’s “The World” for “Cancer’s Lonely Soldier,” “Pink Ribbons to Haiti,” “An Ounce of Prevention,” and “The Infectious Connection” for shining a light on the hidden toll cancer takes in impoverished nations, killing more people than HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis combined.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Eliot Marshal, Elizabeth Culotta, Ann Gibbons, and Greg Miller at Science magazine for their stories “Parsing Terrorism,” “Roots of Racism,” “The Ultimate Sacrifice,” and “Drone Wars,” for an articulate, wide-ranging examination of what social scientists have learned about human violence, conflict, and terrorism.

Online Winner

Alison Young, Peter Eisler (reporters), John Hillkirk (content editor), and the entire team at USA Today for the series “Ghost Factories” for a nationwide investigation of abandoned lead factories that armed reporters and citizens with the knowledge and technology to recognize threats in their own backyards.

2012 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

Barbara A. Schaal (Committee Chair, NAS)

NAS Vice President; Mary-Dell Chilton distinguished professor, department of biology, Washington University

Jad Abumrad

Host, RadioLab, WNYC Radio

Pablo J. Boczkowski

Professor and director, Program in Media, Technology and Society, Northwestern University

Alan Boyle

Blogger, CosmicLog; Science editor, MSNBC

David K. Campbell

Professor of physics and electrical engineering, Boston University

Cornelia Dean

Science writer, The New York Times; writer-in-residence, Brown University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

John H. Linehan (NAE)

Professor of biomedical engineering, Northwestern University

Charles C. Mann

Author and contributing correspondent, Science

Joe Palca

Correspondent, NPR

Gregory A. Petsko (NAS/IOM)

Arthur J. Mahon Professor of Neurology And Neuroscience, Weill Cornell Medical College

Christine Russell

President, Council for the Advancement of Science Writing; Senior fellow, Harvard Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

2012 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 311 entries for works published or aired in 2011, the recipients of the 2012 awards were:

Book Winner

Daniel Kahneman for Thinking, Fast and Slow, an outstanding and accessible book that brings to the public key scientific insights about how we think and make decisions.

Film/Radio/TV Winner

Paula S. Apsell (senior executive producer), Michael Bicks (writer, producer, and director), and Julia Court (senior producer, writer) for “Smartest Machine on Earth” (NOVA), an imaginative television documentary that captures the challenge of programming a computer to mimic the way we think.

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Crocker Stephenson, Guy Boulton, Mark Johnson, John Schmid, and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel staff for the series “Empty Cradles” (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel), distinguished reporting about medical, cultural, and economic dilemmas in the delivery of health care in Milwaukee.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Online Winner

Daniel Engber for the series “The Mouse Trap: How One Rodent Rules the Lab” (Slate magazine), a clear focus on an unappreciated problem in scientific research: Relying exclusively on laboratory mice can be a big mistake.

2011 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

Barbara A. Schaal (Committee Chair, NAS)

NAS Vice President; Mary-Dell Chilton Distinguished Professor, Department of Biology, Washington University

Jad Abumrad

Host and managing editor, RadioLab, WNYC Radio

Deborah Blum

Freelance writer and professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Pablo J. Boczkowski

Associate professor, Program in Media, Technology and Society, and Department of Communication Studies, Northwestern University

Alan Boyle

Blogger, CosmicLog; Science editor, MSNBC

David K. Campbell

Professor of physics and electrical engineering, Boston University

John Linehan (NAE)

Professor of biomedical engineering, Biomedical Engineering Department, Northwestern University; Consulting professor of bioengineering, Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University

Joe Palca

Science correspondent, NPR News

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Gregory A. Petsko (NAS/IOM)

Gyula and Katica Tauber Professor of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Brandeis University

Cristine Russell

President, Council for the Advancement of Science Writing; Senior fellow, Harvard Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Dan Vergano

Science and Medical Reporter, USA Today

2011 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from more than 300 entries for works published or aired in 2010, the recipients of the 2011 awards were:

Book Winner

Rebecca Skloot (author) for The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, a compelling and graceful use of narrative that illuminates the human and ethical issues of scientific research and medical advances.

Film/Radio/TV Winner

Alexa Elliott (producer) and the WPBT2 Production Team of South Florida Public Television (WPBT2) for “Changing Seas: Sentinels of the Seas,” a story of what Florida’s bottlenose dolphins tell us about the health of coastal waters and our own exposure to chemical contaminants.

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Amy Harmon, national correspondent, The New York Times, for “Target: Cancer,” for reporting the promises and realities of clinical drug trials as seen through the eyes of passionate researchers and worried, sometimes desperate patients.

Online Winner

Andrew Revkin, senior fellow for environmental understanding, Pace University, and The New York Times blogger, for “Dot Earth” Blog, for pioneering social media about the issues of climate and sustainability with worldwide readership and impact.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

2010 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

Barbara A. Schaal (Committee Chair, NAS)

NAS Vice President; Mary-Dell Chilton Distinguished Professor, Department of Biology, Washington University

Greg Andorfer

Emmy-winning producer for informal science communications for television, IMAX, radio, print, and museums; Former executive director, Maryland Science Center

Deborah Blum

Freelance writer and professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Pablo J. Boczkowski

Associate professor, Program in Media, Technology and Society, and Department of Communication Studies, Northwestern University

David K. Campbell

Professor of physics and electrical engineering and provost, Boston University

Joe Palca

Science correspondent, NPR News

Henry Petroski (NAE)

Aleksandar S. Vesic Professor of Civil Engineering and Professor of History, Duke University

Gregory A. Petsko (NAS/IOM)

Gyula and Katica Tauber Professor of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Brandeis University

Cristine Russell

President, Council for the Advancement of Science Writing; Senior fellow, Harvard Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Dan Vergano

Science and medical reporter, USA Today

Carl Zimmer

Science writer and book author

2010 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 228 entries for works published or aired in 2009, the recipients of the 2010 awards were:

Book Winner

Richard Holmes, author, The Age of Wonder, a delightful glimpse at the dawn of the modern age and the links between the worlds of science and literature in the romantic era.

Film/Radio/TV Winner

Carole and Richard Rifkind, co-producer and co-director, for “Naturally Obsessed: The Making of a Scientist,” an insightful and very human portrayal of the excitement and challenges young scientists face in and out of the lab (WNET).

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Charles Duhigg of The New York Times and his series “Toxic Waters,” for compelling investigative environmental reporting that has had an important policy impact.

Online Winner

Ed Yong and his blog “Not Exactly Rocket Science,” for engaging and jargon-free multimedia storytelling about science in the digital age.

2009 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

Don Kennedy (Committee Chair, NAS/IOM)

Editor-in-chief emeritus, Science; President emeritus and Bing Professor of Environmental Science Emeritus, Institute for International Studies, Stanford University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Barbara A. Schaal (Committee Vice Chair)

NAS Vice President; Mary-Dell Chilton Distinguished Professor, Department of Biology, Washington University

Greg Andorfer

Emmy-winning producer for informal science communications for television, IMAX, radio, print, and museums; Former executive director, Maryland Science Center; Frostburg State University

Pablo J. Boczkowski

Associate professor, Program in Media, Technology and Society, and Department of Communication Studies, Northwestern University

Deborah Blum

Freelance writer and professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Robert W. Lucky (NAE)

Retired corporate vice president, Research, Telcordia Technologies, Inc.

Joe Palca

Science correspondent, NPR

Henry Petroski (NAE)

Aleksandar S. Vesic Professor of Civil Engineering and Professor of History, Duke University

Gregory A. Petsko (NAS/IOM)

Gyula and Katica Tauber Professor of Biochemistry, Brandeis University; Adjunct professor, Department of Neurology and Center for Neurologic Diseases, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Cristine Russell

President, Council for the Advancement of Science Writing; Senior fellow, Harvard Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Dan Vergano

Science and medical reporter, USA Today

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

2009 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 198 entries for works published or aired in 2008, the recipients of the 2009 awards were:

Book Winner

Neil Shubin for his delightful, intellectually challenging view of evolution from primitive fish to humans by a scientist who finds fossils in the most uncomfortable places and chronicles it all in Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body.

Film/Radio/TV Winner

Larry Adelman (series creator, executive producer), Llewellyn M. Smith (co-executive producer), and Christine Herbes-Sommers (series senior producer) for putting a human face on one of the most complex issues in public health—the impact of racial and socioeconomic inequities in health—in “Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick?” (California NewsReel in association with Vital Pictures Inc.)

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Mark Johnson for his clear reporting on the cutting edge of science, engaging key researchers as they try to open new medical horizons by reprogramming human cells in his series “Targeting the Good Cell” (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel).

Online Winner

Vikki Valentine (digital science editor), Alison Richards (deputy science editor), and Anne Gudenkauf (science editor) for NPR’s “Climate Connections,” a year-long multimedia journey to explain the impacts of global climate change with well-reported stories from around the world.

2008 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

Don Kennedy (Committee Chair, NAS/IOM)

Editor-in-chief, Science, President emeritus and Bing Professor of Environmental Science Emeritus

Institute for International Studies, Stanford University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Greg Andorfer

Emmy-winning producer for informal science communications for television, IMAX, radio, print, and museums; Former executive director, Maryland Science Center

Deborah Blum

Freelance writer and professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication

University of Wisconsin–Madison

Pablo J. Boczkowski

Associate professor, Program in Media, Technology and Society, and Department of Communication Studies, Northwestern University

Barbara J. Culliton (Past Chair) (IOM)

Contributing editor, Health Affairs

Robert W. Lucky (NAE)

Retired corporate vice president, Research, Telcordia Technologies, Inc.

Joe Palca

Science correspondent, NPR

Henry Petroski (NAE)

Aleksandar S. Vesic Professor of Civil Engineering and Professor of History, Duke University

Cristine Russell

President, Council for the Advancement of Science Writing; Senior fellow, Harvard Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Dan Vergano

Science and medical reporter, USA Today; Fellow, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University

Carl Zimmer

Science writer and book author

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

2008 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 240 entries for works published or aired in 2007, the recipients of the 2008 awards were:

Book Winner

Walter Isaacson for Einstein: His Life and Universe, a comprehensive and scholarly ambitious look at the life and mind of the preeminent scientific figure of the 20th century.

Film/Radio/TV Winner

George Butler (director), White Mountain Films, Kennedy-Marshall Films, and Walt Disney Company for Roving Mars, a spectacular film that chronicles the science and engineering behind the Mars rovers and follows their breathtaking search for water on the red planet.

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Bob Marshall, Mark Schleifstein, Dan Swenson, and Ted Jackson for “Last Chance: The Fight to Save a Disappearing Coast” (The Times-Picayune, New Orleans), an outstanding newspaper series that combines superb storytelling with the latest science in its call to action to save Louisiana’s wetlands.

Online Winner

Alan Boyle, MSNBC.com science editor, for selected works from Cosmic Log and his pioneering efforts to bring daily coverage of the physical sciences, technological innovation, and space sciences to broad new audiences on a popular news website.

2007 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

Don Kennedy (Committee Chair, NAS/IOM)

Editor-in-chief, Science; President emeritus and Bing Professor of Environmental Science Emeritus, Institute for International Studies, Stanford University

Deborah Blum

Professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

David Clark

Producer and director, David Clark Inc.

Barbara J. Culliton (Committee Past Chair, IOM)

Deputy Editor, Health Affairs

Robert W. Lucky (NAE)

Retired corporate vice president, Research, Telcordia Technologies, Inc.

Sherwin B. Nuland

Clinical professor of surgery, Yale School of Medicine

Joe Palca

Science correspondent, NPR

Cristine Russell

Freelance writer; fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Harvard University

Curt Suplee

Director, Office of Legislative and Public Affairs, National Science Foundation (Retired June 2007)

Dan Vergano

Science and medical reporter, USA Today

2007 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 250 entries for works published or aired in 2006, the recipients of the 2007 awards were:

Book Winner

Eric Kandel, for In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of the Mind, a scientist’s personal memoir that skillfully blends an explanation of the science of memory.

Film/Radio/TV Winner

Jad Abumrad, host and producer of Radio Lab’s “Musical Language,” and “Where Am I?,” WNYC, New York Public Radio, for his imaginative use of radio to make science accessible to broad audiences.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Carl Zimmer, freelance writer, “Highly Evolved and Exquisitely Thirsty,” “Silent Struggle: A New Theory of Pregnancy,” “This Can’t Be Love,” and “Devious Butterflies, Full-Throated Frogs, and Other Liars,” published in The New York Times; “A Fin Is a Limb Is a Wing,” published in National Geographic; and The Loom, a science blog hosted by Seed magazine, for his diverse and consistently interesting coverage of evolution and unexpected biology.

2006 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

Barbara J. Culliton (Committee Chair, IOM)

Deputy editor, Health Affairs

Don Kennedy (Committee Vice-Chair, NAS/IOM)

Editor-in-chief, Science; President emeritus and Bing Professor of Environmental Science Emeritus,

Institute for International Studies, Stanford University

Deborah Blum

Professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Wisconsin–Madison

David Clark

Producer and director, David Clark Inc.

Peter Dykstra

Executive producer, CNN Science and Technology

Samuel C. Florman (NAE)

Chairman, Kreisler Borg Florman Construction Company

Lubert Stryer (NAS)

Winzer Professor, Emeritus, Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University School of Medicine

Curt Suplee

Director, Office of Legislative and Public Affairs, National Science Foundation

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Abigail Trafford

Author and weekly columnist, The Washington Post

Dan Vergano

Science and medical reporter, USA Today

2006 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 252 entries for works published or aired in 2005, the recipients of the 2006 awards were:

Book Winner

Charles Mann for 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus, for his engaging and thought-provoking rediscovery of the early human history of our continent.

Radio/TV Winner

Nic Young, director; Anna Thomson, producer; and Bill Locke, executive producer, for The History Channel and Lion Television’s “Ape to Man,” an accurate and entertaining overview of human evolution made accessible to broad audiences.

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Elizabeth Kolbert, The New Yorker, for her authoritative treatment of the science and politics of global climate change in the three-part series “The Climate of Man.”

2005 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

Barbara J. Culliton (Committee Chair, IOM)

Deputy editor, Health Affairs

David Clark

Producer and director, David Clark Inc.

Peter Dykstra

Executive producer, CNN Science and Technology

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Samuel C. Florman (NAE)

Chairman, Kreisler Borg Florman Construction Company

Peggy Girshman

Assistant managing editor, NPR

George Strait

Associate vice chancellor, University of California, Berkeley

Lubert Stryer (NAS)

Winzer Professor, Emeritus, Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University School of Medicine

Curt Suplee

Director, Office of Legislative and Public Affairs, National Science Foundation

Abigail Trafford

Author and weekly columnist, The Washington Post; Senior fellow, Civic Ventures

2005 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 202 entries for works published or aired in 2004, the recipients of the 2005 awards were:

Book Winner

John M. Barry, The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History

Radio/TV Winner

Thomas Levenson and Paul Apsell, WGBH NOVA, “Origins: Back to the Beginning”

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Gareth Cook, The Boston Globe, “The Stem Cell Debate”

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

2004 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

Barbara J. Culliton (Committee Chair, IOM)

Vice president for publishing, The Center for the Advancement of Genomics; Editor-in-chief, Genome News Network

Marcia Bartusiak

Author and professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

May Berenbaum (NAS)

Professor, department of entomology, University of Illinois

Peter Dykstra

Executive producer, CNN Science Desk

Peggy Girshman

Assistant managing editor, NPR

David Perlman

Science editor, San Francisco Chronicle

Henry Petroski (NAE)

Professor of civil engineering and history, Duke University

Paul Raeburn

Author

George Strait

Associate vice chancellor for public affairs, University of California, Berkley

2004 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from 143 entries for works published or aired in 2003, the recipients of the 2004 awards were:

Book Winner

Matt Ridley, The Agile Gene: How Nature Turns on Nurture

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

Radio/TV Winner

Sue Norton and David Clark, The Science Channel’s (Discovery Communications, Inc.) “Science of the Deep: Mid-Water Mysteries”

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Robert Lee Hotz, Los Angeles Times, “Butterfly on a Bullet”

2003 National Academies Communication Awards Selection Committee

Barbara J. Culliton (Committee Chair, IOM)

Vice president for publishing, The Center for the Advancement of Genomics; Editor-in-chief, Genome News Network

Marcia Bartusiak

Author and visiting professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

May Berenbaum (NAS)

Professor of entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

David Billington (NAE)

Professor of civil engineering and operations research, Princeton University

Peggy Girshman

Assistant managing editor, NPR

David Perlman

Science editor, San Francisco Chronicle

Boyce Rensberger

Director, Knight Science Journalism Fellowships, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

George Strait

Assistant vice chancellor for public affairs, University of California, Berkeley

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×

2003 National Academies Communication Awards Winners

Selected from entries for works published or aired in 2002, the recipients of the 2003 awards were:

Book Winner

Carl Safina for Eye of the Albatross: Visions of Hope and Survival

Radio/TV Winner

Joe Palca, NPR, for a series of news stories for radio about the scientific and human dimensions of cloning

Newspaper/Magazine Winner

Andrew Revkin, The New York Times, for a series of articles on the complex science and policy issues of global climate change

Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 325
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 326
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 327
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 328
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 329
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 330
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 331
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 332
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 333
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 334
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 335
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 336
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 337
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 338
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 340
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 341
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 342
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 343
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 344
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 345
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 346
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 347
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 348
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
Page 349
Suggested Citation:"Appendix IV: Communication Awards Selection Committees and Winners by Year." National Research Council. 2018. Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25239.
×
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Next: Appendix V: Five- and Ten-Year Review Summaries and Panel Members »
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This publication represents the culmination of the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative (NAKFI), a program of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the National Academy of Medicine supported by a 15-year, $40 million grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation to advance the future of science through interdisciplinary research. From 2003 to 2017, more than 2,000 researchers and other professionals across disciplines and sectors attended an annual “think-tank” style conference to contemplate real-world challenges. Seed grants awarded to conference participants enabled further pursuit of bold, new research and ideas generated at the conference.

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