National Academies Press: OpenBook

Safety Regulation for Small LPG Distribution Systems (2018)

Chapter: Appendix A: Questionnaire to State Pipeline Safety Program Managers on the Regulation of Liquefied Petroleum Gas Distribution Systems

« Previous: 5 Summary Review and Advice
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Questionnaire to State Pipeline Safety Program Managers on the Regulation of Liquefied Petroleum Gas Distribution Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Safety Regulation for Small LPG Distribution Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25245.
×
Page 91
Page 92
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Questionnaire to State Pipeline Safety Program Managers on the Regulation of Liquefied Petroleum Gas Distribution Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Safety Regulation for Small LPG Distribution Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25245.
×
Page 92

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

91 The National Association of Pipeline Safety Representatives (NAPSR) cir- culated a questionnaire in November 2017, developed by the study com- mittee, to the member pipeline program managers responsible for safety regulation in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. There were 50 respondents to the questionnaire. Notably, the extensive responses to the third question regarding the number of regulated liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) distribution systems enabled the committee to draw useful insights for the study. For the other questions, the variability in the responses proved a challenge for analysis. The responses to the question- naire from the pipeline safety program managers are available in the public access file for the study. QUESTIONNAIRE 1. What are the most common regulatory violations found in inspec- tions of LPG pipeline systems serving 99 or fewer customers? 2. How often are enforcement actions taken against facilities (by jurisdiction status and state)? What relief is sought (i.e., citations, civil penalties, injunctions)? 3. How many jurisdictional systems (as defined by 49 CFR Part 192) exist in your state or are under your safety jurisdiction? a. Number of jurisdictional systems: b. Number of systems serving 100 or more customers: c. Number of systems serving 50–99 customers: APPENDIX A Questionnaire to State Pipeline Safety Program Managers on the Regulation of Liquefied Petroleum Gas Distribution Systems

92 SAFETY REGULATION FOR SMALL LPG DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS d. Number of systems serving 10–49 customers: e. Number of systems serving fewer than 10 customers: 4. How many jurisdictional systems are inspected annually? 5. How often are jurisdictional systems inspected? 6. How many non-jurisdictional systems exist in your state (estimate if not known)? 7. How much is expended on enforcement of jurisdictional LPG pipe- line facilities? 8. If your agency uses resources to enforce non-jurisdictional LPG pipeline facilities, how much would you estimate is expended on enforcement? Is this expenditure part of the current budget for enforcement of jurisdictional systems? 9. What are the most common types of failure for propane gas sys- tems? Please identify the five most common failure modes. 10. To the best of your understanding, in a scenario where the thresh- old for qualifying as a non-jurisdictional system were raised to 99, which public agency would become the authority having jurisdic- tion for these systems with less than 100 customers? 11. When inspecting a facility under your jurisdiction, what documents are facilities expected to maintain compliance with (U.S. DOT; National Fire Protection Association, NFPA). Please note which version of the document; e.g., NFPA 58 2004 versus NFPA 58 2017, NFPA 59. 12. Are there specific changes to the operation/maintenance require- ments in Part 192 that the regulators should consider as an alterna- tive to exempting the facilities from Part 192? 13. Would you support the creation of a separate, streamlined inspec- tion program for small LPG facilities? If so, in your estimation, what features must it include to assure safety outcomes consistent with current safety trends and why? 14. The NFPA develops its standards using a well-documented process. Do you have any general governance concerns regarding the pro- cess used in the creation or modification of past or current editions of the NFPA 58 standard?

Next: Appendix B: Interpretation Letters Regarding the Definition of Public Place »
Safety Regulation for Small LPG Distribution Systems Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The final version of TRB Special Report 327: Safety Regulation for Small LPG Distribution Systems is now available. The report examines the regulatory framework for gas pipeline systems that transport propane and other types of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for service to 100 or fewer customers. Most of the more than 12 million households and businesses that use LPG are on single-customer systems but a small number—between 3,800 and 5,800—are served by multi-user systems. These systems are potentially subject to federal safety regulations administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA).

In response to a congressional request under the direction of PHMSA, the report reviews the safety regulatory framework that applies to small multi-user LPG pipeline systems, reviews what is known about their safety performance, and provides recommendations on ways to make their regulatory requirements more risk-based. The committee recommends that PHMSA develop more effective means of identifying small, multi-user LPG systems and to ensure they are inspected and their risks are better understood. The report recommends actions intended to allow more uniform interpretations of regulatory terms, the collection of condition and safety information on small LPG systems, and state regulators to seek permission from PHMSA to allow some small systems to opt out of certain federal regulatory requirements that are not applicable to their risks.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!