National Academies Press: OpenBook

Airport Waste Management and Recycling Practices (2018)

Chapter: Chapter 6 - Case Examples

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Page 33
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6 - Case Examples." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Airport Waste Management and Recycling Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25254.
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Page 33
Page 34
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6 - Case Examples." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Airport Waste Management and Recycling Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25254.
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Page 34
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6 - Case Examples." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Airport Waste Management and Recycling Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25254.
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Page 35

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33 The case examples for this synthesis highlight effective solid waste management strategies at commercial service airports. Information was collected about practices that have become some- what standard and about innovative and state-of-the-art approaches to reduction, diversion, recycling, composting, and disposal. Twenty commercial service airports agreed to contribute a case example, and representatives from each of these facilities participated in phone interviews. One airport did not participate in the first survey but did contribute a case study. In addition, a representative from Snohomish County participated in a case example interview and provided information about the county’s facility. Snohomish County Airport – Paine Field is currently a general aviation facility and is planning for a future passenger terminal. Information collected from Snohomish County is included here to serve as a comparison to the commercial service facilities and as a reference for other general aviation airports. The organizations and airports participating in the case examples are listed in Table 4 by hub size and three-letter identifier. The table gives an overview of the characteristics of each case example airport and lists notable effective program elements. These elements may also be practiced by several other airports and are in addition to baseline practices such as recycling in terminals and employee areas. The full case example program descriptions are included in the appendices, which can be found at http://www.trb.org/acrp/acrpsynthesis92.aspx. C H A P T E R 6 Case Examples ID (Appendix) Organization Airport State NPIAS Hub Type Current Enplaned Passengers (2017–2021 NPIAS) Notable Program Elements ABQ (4) City of Albuquerque Aviation Department Albuquerque International Sunport New Mexico Medium hub 2,354,184 • New terminal containers • Reuse of previous containers • Sole-source procurement process • Stakeholder survey ATL (5) City of Atlanta Department of Aviation Hartsfield– Jackson Atlanta International Airport Georgia Large hub 46,604,273 • Constructing on-site processing facility • Coreless toilet paper rolls • Eliminated toilet paper cardboard packaging • New terminal containers • Recycle Across America container labels • Requiring compostable serviceware and carryout containers – impact on major brands Table 4. Facility and program information: case example airports. (continued on next page)

34 Airport Waste Management and Recycling Practices ID (Appendix) Organization Airport State NPIAS Hub Type Current Enplaned Passengers (2017–2021 NPIAS) Notable Program Elements • Luggage donation • Paper products donation • Paper towel composting • Pre-consumer food waste composting • Separate glass recycling • Separate plastic film recycling DTW (9) Wayne County Airport Authority Detroit Metropolitan Airport Michigan Large hub 15,775,941 • Employee tumblers/mugs • Food donation program • Paper recycling during administrative office relocation EWR (10) Port Authority of New York & New Jersey Newark Liberty International New Jersey Large hub 17,773,405 • Recycle Across America container labels • Terminal container inspection LAS (11) Clark County Department of Aviation McCarran International Airport Nevada Large hub 20,344,867 • Carpet recycling • Food donation • Toiletry donations to United Service Organizations MKE (12) County of Milwaukee Airport Division General Mitchell International Airport Wisconsin Medium hub 3,228,607 • Airside recycling facility • Customized janitorial carts • Food donation • Material balers MSP (13) Metropolitan Airports Commission Minneapolis– Saint Paul International Airport Minnesota Large hub 16,972,678 • Compost container wash facility • Diversion requirements in tenant leases • Recycle Across America container labels • Sustainability criteria in selection process PAE (14) Snohomish County Snohomish County Washington General aviation N/A • Recycling from fire, administration, and maintenance facilities AUS (6) City of Austin Department of Aviation Austin– Bergstrom International Airport Texas Medium hub 5,219,982 • Ad hoc blanket donation program • Food donation • Gainsharing program/monetary incentives for employees • Lease requirements for recycling and composting • Waste-hauling company composition sort COS (7) City of Colorado Springs Colorado Springs Airport Colorado Small hub 624,317 • Tenant surveys • Waste management procedure DEN (8) City and County of Denver Denver International Airport Colorado Large hub 26,000,591 • Composting from large events for employees • Dedicated Southwest Airlines recycling center • Food donation Airport – Paine Field • Working to design waste management strategies for future terminal and airline service PDX (15) Port of Portland Portland International Airport Oregon Large hub 7,878,760 • Bucket wash area • Food donation • Individual restaurant assessments • Student consultants/partnership with local university • Tenant bulky item cleanup events • Tenant requirements in airport rules • Recognition/appreciation program with monetary rewards • Reusable plates pilot program • Carpet reuse and recycling Table 4. (Continued).

Case Examples 35 Authority • Solar-hybrid compactors SEA (20) Port of Seattle Seattle– Tacoma International Airport Washington Large hub 17,888,080 • Pay As You Throw waste charges assessed to tenants/usage monitoring system • Airfield recycling facility • Compostable serviceware requirements • Food donation SFO (21) City and County of San Francisco San Francisco International Airport California Large hub 22,770,783 • Food donation • Garbage bag color coding • Maps and guides • Material recovery areas • Opportunity for savings on permit fees • Repurposed existing bins SLC (22) Salt Lake City Department of Airports Salt Lake City International Airport Utah Large hub 10,139,065 • Garbage bag color coding • Material rebates • Repurposed existing bins • Sustainability dashboard SMF (23) Sacramento County Airport System Sacramento International Airport California Medium hub 4,384,616 • Customized janitorial carts • Dedicated recycling coordinator • Garbage bags made from recycled content • Rightsized garbage bags • Separation of pizza boxes in food court TUL (24) Tulsa Airports Improvement Trust Tulsa International Airport Oklahoma Small hub 1,371,613 • Transitioning hauling contractor • Transitioning janitorial contractor • Transitioning to recycling from energy- from-waste ID (Appendix) Organization Airport State NPIAS Hub Type Current Enplaned Passengers (2017–2021 NPIAS) Notable Program Elements PHL (16) City of Philadelphia Aviation Division Philadelphia International Airport Pennsylvania Large hub 14,792,339 • Addressing contamination • Dedicated recycling coordinator • Waste to energy PHX (17) City of Phoenix Aviation Department Sky Harbor International Airport Arizona Large hub 20,344,867 • Dedicated recycling coordinator • Pre-consumer and employee food waste composting • Waste composition study RNO (18) Reno–Tahoe Airport Authority Reno–Tahoe International Airport Nevada Small hub 1,611,572 • Bicycle donation (Burning Man) • City franchise agreement • Self-haul of recyclables • Tenant inspections SAN (19) San Diego County Regional Airport San Diego International Airport California h Large ub 9,333,152 • Food donation • Green concessions program • Pre-consumer composting • Separate plastic film recycling Table 4. (Continued).

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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 92: Airport Waste Management and Recycling Practices focuses on airport waste management and recycling practices that reduce impacts and costs to airports and their surrounding communities. The information in this study was acquired through a literature review, survey results from 35 organizations representing 36 airports from a range of geographic locations and airport classifications, and interviews of a subset of 21 airport waste management experts. The results of the literature review and survey are presented in this short report. Supporting Materials, Case Examples, and Toolkits for ACRP Synthesis 92 includes survey results, case examples representing in-depth interviews on specific airport waste management and recycling practices, and toolkits of existing effective practices to assist airports in implementing their waste management and recycling programs.

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