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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×

TABLE F-1 Distributions of Minority Serving Institutions by Sector

HBCU TCU AANAPISI HSI PBI ANNH NASNTI Non-MSI
Public Four-Year 40 1 36 78 8 7 9 436
Private Nonprofit Four-Year 41 0 24 86 24 4 2 1,101
Public Two-Year 11 25 54 181 56 14 12 711
Private Nonprofit Two-Year 7 8 6 32 17 3 4 167
Total 99 34 120 377 105 28 27 2,415

NOTES:

  1. Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) data, collection year 2015, were used to create the list of institutions throughout this report for analysis run by the American Council on Education. Data in this report reflect Title IV participating, degree-granting, public and private, nonprofit, two-year and four-year institutions that offered undergraduate degrees. College Scorecard 2015-2016 data were used to flag institutions that were eligible to apply for federal MSI funding in that given fiscal year through Title III and Title V of the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008. Out of 3,129 total institutions, 714 were eligible for MSI designation. Of these institutions, 76 were eligible for more than one MSI designation.
  2. Institutions were classified into a sector based on the institutional category variable and control variable in IPEDS. Within institutional category, all institutions categorized as degree-granting, primarily baccalaureate or above institutions were classified as four-year institutions, and all institutions categorized as degree-granting, not primarily baccalaureate or above and degree-granting, associate’s and certificates institutions were classified as two-year institutions. The control variable was used to classify institutions as public or private nonprofit.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×
Image
FIGURE F-1 Total share of enrollment by race/ethnicity at MSI types, 2016 data.
SOURCE: IPEDS 2016 Completions and Institutional Characteristics data. Analysis by the American Institutes for Research for this report.
NOTE: IPEDS data, collection year 2015, were used to create the list of institutions throughout this report for analysis run by the American Council on Education. Data in this report reflect Title IV participating, degree-granting, public and private, nonprofit, two-year and four-year institutions that offered undergraduate degrees. College Scorecard 2015-2016 data were used to flag institutions that were eligible to apply for federal MSI funding in that given fiscal year through Title III and Title V of the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008. Out of 3,129 total institutions, 714 were eligible for MSI designation. Of these institutions, 76 were eligible for more than one MSI designation.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×

TABLE F-2 Raw Data Used in Calculations for Figure 3-4

Total Number of Students Enrolled Total Number of Students Enrolled in STEM Fields Total Number of Students Enrolled in Non-STEM Fields
HBCU 81,903 35,751 46,152
AANAPISI 25,0417 121,237 129,180
HSI 475,574 205,917 269,657
Non-MSI 2,980,105 1,191,208 1,788,897

SOURCE: IPEDS 2016 Fall Enrollment and Institutional Characteristics data. Analysis by the American Institutes for Research for this report.

NOTES:

  1. IPEDS data, collection year 2015, were used to create the list of institutions throughout this report for analysis run by the American Council on Education. Data in this report reflect Title IV participating, degree-granting, public and private, nonprofit, two-year and four-year institutions that offered undergraduate degrees. College Scorecard 2015-2016 data were used to flag institutions that were eligible to apply for federal MSI funding in that given fiscal year through Title III and Title V of the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008. Out of 3,129 total institutions, 714 were eligible for MSI designation. Of these institutions, 76 were eligible for more than one MSI designation.
  2. Total completions includes the following credentials: prebaccalaureate certificates, associate degrees, bachelor’s degrees, postbaccalaureate certificates, master’s degrees, and doctoral degrees.
  3. For completions, the racial category “other” is defined as the combination of “nonresident,” “race unknown,” and “two or more races.” Race reporting varies across years in the IPEDS, so information pertaining to Pacific Islanders is not available for all years and would be combined with counts for Asian American students.
  4. For the completions data, all Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) codes were converted to current CIP codes using available crosswalks, before applying the classifications based on the NSF taxonomy. The following CIP code conversion required for some IPEDS data files prior to 2004 was added to the crosswalk to convert 1990s to 2000s CIP codes: 8.0199, 8.0299, 8.0899, 8.1299 to 52.19. For the completions data, counts were collapsed across majornum 1 and 2. Completion degree type codes changed slightly in 2010 and later versions of the data, so slightly different groupings were used. For completions data prior to 2010: “3”=Associate, “5”=Bachelor, “7”=Master, “9”=Doctor, “10”=Doctor, “1”=Pre-BA Certificate, “2”=Pre-BA Certificate, “4”=Pre-BA Certificate, “6”=Post-BA Certificate, “8”=Post-BA Certificate, and “11”=Post-BA Certificate. For completions data from 2010 and later: “3”=Associate, “5”=Bachelor, “7”=Master, “17”=Doctor, “18”=Doctor, “19”=Doctor, “1”=Pre-BA Certificate, “2”=Pre-BA Certificate, “4”=Pre-BA Certificate, “6”=Post-BA Certificate, and “8”=Post-BA Certificate.
  5. For all but a few runs, data were not filtered using the First Look Report criteria. The First Look Report uses provisional IPEDS data, and therefore totals may be slightly different from those reported in other federal reports, though these differences will be minor.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×

TABLE F-3 Raw Data Used in Calculations for Figure 4-7

Total Number of Completions Total Number of Completions in STEM Fields Total Number of Completions in Non-STEM Fields
HBCU 55,922 13,117 42,805
AANAPISI 304,346 90,540 213,806
HSI 724,728 158,721 566,007
Non-MSI 4,008,443 867,663 3,140,780

SOURCE: IPEDS 2016 Fall Enrollment and Institutional Characteristics data. Analysis by the American Institutes for Research for this report.

NOTE:

  1. IPEDS data, collection year 2015, were used to create the list of institutions throughout this report for analysis run by the American Council on Education. Data in this report reflect Title IV participating, degree-granting, public and private, nonprofit, two-year and four-year institutions that offered undergraduate degrees. College Scorecard 2015-2016 data were used to flag institutions that were eligible to apply for federal MSI funding in that given fiscal year through Title III and Title V of the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008. Out of 3,129 total institutions, 714 were eligible for MSI designation. Of these institutions, 76 were eligible for more than one MSI designation.
  2. Total completions includes the following credentials: pre-baccalaureate certificates, associate degrees, bachelor’s degrees, post-baccalaureate certificates, master’s degrees, and doctoral degrees.
  3. For completions, the racial category “other” is defined as the combination of “nonresident,” “race unknown,” and “two or more races.” Race reporting varies across years in the IPEDS, so information pertaining to Pacific Islanders is not available for all years and would be combined with counts for Asian American students.
  4. Classification of CIP codes into Science and Engineering categories was based on the fields of study classification found in the National Science Foundation’s (NSF’s) “Science and Engineering Degrees: 1966–2012,” appendix B, with additions made to cover CIP codes found in the IPEDS completions data that were not included in the NSF taxonomy. For the completions data, all CIP codes were converted to current CIP codes using available crosswalks, before applying the classifications based on the NSF taxonomy. The following CIP code conversion required for some IPEDS data files prior to 2004 was added to the crosswalk to convert 1990s to 2000s CIP codes: 8.0199, 8.0299, 8.0899, 8.1299 to 52.19. For the completions data, counts were collapsed across majornum 1 and 2. Completion degree type codes changed slightly in 2010 and later versions of the data, so slightly different groupings were used. For completions data prior to 2010: “3”=Associate, “5”=Bachelor, “7”=Master, “9”=Doctor, “10”=Doctor,”1”=Pre-BA Certificate, “2”=Pre-BA Certificate, “4”=Pre-BA Certificate,”6”=Post-BA Certificate, “8”=Post-BA Certificate, and “11”=Post-BA Certificate. For completions data from 2010 and later: “3”=Associate, “5”=Bachelor, “7”=Master, “17”=Doctor, “18”=Doctor, “19”=Doctor, “1”=Pre-BA Certificate, “2”=Pre-BA Certificate, “4”=Pre-BA Certificate, “6”=Post-BA Certificate, and “8”=Post-BA Certificate.
  5. For all but a few runs, data were not filtered using the First Look Report criteria. The First Look Report uses provisional IPEDS data, and therefore totals may be slightly different from those reported in other federal reports, though these differences will be minor.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×

TABLE F-4 Raw Data Used in Calculations for Figure 4-8

Total Number of STEM Bachelor’s Degrees
Earned by African American Students
Non-HBCUs 54,918
HBCUs 8,554
Total Number of STEM Bachelor’s Degrees
Earned by Asian American Students
Non-AANAPISIs 66,192
AANAPISIs 12,455
Total Number of STEM Bachelor’s Degrees
Earned by Hispanic Students
Non-HSIs 89,733
HSIs 36,368

SOURCE: IPEDS 2016 Completions and Institutional Characteristics data. Analysis by the American Institutes for Research for the current report.

NOTES:

  1. IPEDS data, collection year 2015, were used to create the list of institutions throughout this report for analysis run by the American Council on Education. Data in this report reflect Title IV participating, degree-granting, public and private, nonprofit, two-year and four-year institutions that offered undergraduate degrees. College Scorecard 2015-2016 data were used to flag institutions that were eligible to apply for federal MSI funding in that given fiscal year through Title III and Title V of the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008. Out of 3,129 total institutions, 714 were eligible for MSI designation. Of these institutions, 76 were eligible for more than one MSI designation.
  2. Total completions includes the following credentials: prebaccalaureate certificates, associate degrees, bachelor’s degrees, postbaccalaureate certificates, master’s degrees, and doctoral degrees.
  3. For completions, the racial category “other” is defined as the combination of “nonresident,” “race unknown,” and “two or more races.” Race reporting varies across years in the IPEDS, so information pertaining to Pacific Islanders is not available for all years and would be combined with counts for Asian American students.
  4. Classification of CIP codes into Science and Engineering categories was based on the fields of study classification found in the NSF’s “Science and Engineering Degrees: 1966–2012,” appendix B, with additions made to cover CIP codes found in the IPEDS completions data that were not included in the NSF taxonomy. For the completions data, all CIP codes were converted to current CIP codes using available crosswalks, before applying the classifications based on the NSF taxonomy. The following CIP code conversion required for some IPEDS data files prior to 2004 was added to the crosswalk to convert 1990s to 2000s CIP codes: 8.0199, 8.0299, 8.0899, 8.1299 to 52.19. For the completions data, counts were collapsed across majornum 1 and 2. Completion degree type codes changed slightly in 2010 and later versions of the data, so slightly different groupings were used. For completions data prior to 2010: “3”=Associate, “5”=Bachelor, “7”=Master, “9”=Doctor, “10”=Doctor, “1”=Pre-BA Certificate, “2”=Pre-BA Certificate, “4”=Pre-BA Certificate, “6”=Post-BA Certificate, “8”=Post-BA Certificate, and “11”=Post-BA Certificate. For completions data from 2010 and later: “3”=Associate, “5”=Bachelor, “7”=Master, “17”=Doctor,”18”=Doctor, “19”=Doctor, “1”=Pre-BA Certificate, “2”=Pre-BA Certificate, “4”=Pre-BA Certificate, “6”=Post-BA Certificate, and “8”=Post-BA Certificate.
  5. For all but a few runs, data were not filtered using the First Look Report criteria. The First Look Report uses provisional IPEDS data and therefore totals may be slightly different than those reported in other federal reports, though these differences will be minor.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×
Page 227
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×
Page 228
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×
Page 229
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×
Page 230
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×
Page 231
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Supplemental Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Minority Serving Institutions: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25257.
×
Page 232
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There are over 20 million young people of color in the United States whose representation in STEM education pathways and in the STEM workforce is still far below their numbers in the general population. Their participation could help re-establish the United States’ preeminence in STEM innovation and productivity, while also increasing the number of well-educated STEM workers.

There are nearly 700 minority-serving institutions (MSIs) that provide pathways to STEM educational success and workforce readiness for millions of students of color—and do so in a mission-driven and intentional manner. They vary substantially in their origins, missions, student demographics, and levels of institutional selectivity. But in general, their service to the nation provides a gateway to higher education and the workforce, particularly for underrepresented students of color and those from low-income and first-generation to college backgrounds. The challenge for the nation is how to capitalize on the unique strengths and attributes of these institutions and to equip them with the resources, exceptional faculty talent, and vital infrastructure needed to educate and train an increasingly critical portion of current and future generations of scientists, engineers, and health professionals.

Minority Serving Institutions examines the nation’s MSIs and identifies promising programs and effective strategies that have the highest potential return on investment for the nation by increasing the quantity and quality MSI STEM graduates. This study also provides critical information and perspective about the importance of MSIs to other stakeholders in the nation’s system of higher education and the organizations that support them.

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