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Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms (2019)

Chapter: Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
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Appendix

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

Catherine L. Kling (Chair) is a professor in the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, as well as faculty director at the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, at Cornell University. She was formerly the Charles F. Curtiss distinguished professor of agriculture and life sciences, a professor of economics, and director of the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, all at Iowa State University. Kling is undertaking research to examine how agricultural practices affect water quality, wildlife, soil carbon content, and greenhouse gases. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and an elected fellow of both the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and the American Agricultural Economics Association. She currently serves as chair of the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine’s Water Science and Technology Board and has been a member of several previous National Academies committees. Kling holds a B.S. in business and economics from the University of Iowa and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland.

J. Gordon Arbuckle, Jr., is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Iowa State University. His research and extension activities focus on improving the social and environmental performance of agriculture. His primary area of interest is drivers of farmer and agricultural stakeholder decision making and action realted to soil and water quality. He is codirector of the Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll, a survey research program that collects and disseminates information on issues of importance to agricultural stakeholders across Iowa and the Midwest. Arbuckle holds

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
×

an M.S. in agricultural economics and a Ph.D. in rural sociology, both from the University of Missouri.

Norman M. Bradburn is the Tiffany and Margaret Blake distinguished service professor emeritus at the University of Chicago, where he also served on the faculties of the Department of Psychology, the Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies, the Booth School of Business, and the College. He is also a senior fellow at NORC at the University of Chicago. Bradburn previously served as assistant director for social, behavioral, and economic sciences at the National Science Foundation. His research focuses on psychological well-being and the assessment of quality of life using large-scale sample surveys. He has served on more than two dozen National Academies activities, including a term as chair of the Committee on National Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He holds an M.A. in clinical psychology and a Ph.D. in social psychology, both from Harvard University.

Richard A. Dunn is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Connecticut. He is also an affiliate of the Connecticut Center for Health Improvement and Policy and the Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy. Dunn’s research focuses on the use of federal administrative data to better measure the contribution of food and agriculture industries to the U.S. economy, with emphasis on the effect of different reporting requirements across federal administrative and survey programs. Dunn was previously an assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. He holds a B.A. in economics and mathematics from Williams College, an M.Sc. in econometrics and mathematical economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Allen M. Featherstone is the department head and a professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics, as well as director of the masters in agribusiness program, at Kansas State University. As an agriculture finance scholar, he has studied land markets, investment decisions, mergers in the financial services industry, the probability of agricultural loan default and loan loss severity, the influence of taxes on farmland, and alternative federal tax systems. Featherstone worked to create the Comparative Food and Agriculture Systems course to give students first-hand knowledge of agriculture and cultural situations in other parts of the world. He is currently an

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
×

executive director of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association. Featherstone holds an M.S. and a Ph.D. in agricultural economics, both from Purdue University.

Joseph W. Glauber is a senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington, DC, where his areas of interest are price volatility, global grain reserves, crop insurance, and trade. Prior to joining IFPRI, Glauber spent more than 30 years at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), including as chief economist from 2008 to 2014. As chief economist, he was responsible for USDA’s agricultural forecasts and projections, oversaw climate, energy, and regulatory issues, and served as chairman of the board of directors of the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation. He is an elected fellow of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association and holds a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Wisconsin.

Brent Hueth is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics and director of the University of Wisconsin Center for Cooperatives at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His research and teaching focus on agricultural firms and markets, cooperative enterprise, and economic development. Hueth has published in top economics journals, including the American Journal of Agricultural Economics and the Journal of Regulatory Economics, and is a research fellow at the Institute for Exceptional Growth Companies. He also serves as executive director of the Census Bureau’s Research Data Center at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Hueth holds a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Maryland.

Ani L. Katchova is farm income enhancement chair and associate professor in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics at The Ohio State University. In her role as chair of the Farm Income Enhancement Program, she manages a research team of post-doctoral students and graduate research assistants to conduct research and outreach on U.S. agricultural economics issues. Katchova’s research areas include agricultural finance, cooperatives, agribusiness management and marketing, and applied econometrics. Her research has been published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Finance Review, and Agribusiness. She currently serves as chair of the review panel of the USDA-Economic Research Service’s (USDA-ERS’s) Farm Income and Wealth Forecast Program, and is an executive board director of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association. She holds a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
×

Doris Mold is the president of Sunrise Agricultural Associates, LLC, an agricultural consulting firm. She is an agricultural consultant, agricultural economist, and educator, as well as a farm co-owner/operator. She also teaches farm and agri-business management at the University of Minnesota for MAST International. In 2015, she served on an expert national Panel on Statistics on Women and Beginning Farmers in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Census of Agriculture. Mold served 6 years on the Agricultural Statistics Advisory Committee for the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) and chaired the committee for 3 years. Mold is past president of American Agri-Women, the nation’s largest coalition of women in agriculture. Mold maintains a unique position as a producer who uses NASS data and provides data to NASS (via her active dairy farming operation), and as an economist who utilizes the data in research, teaching, business, and in volunteer advocacy. She holds an M.S. in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Minnesota.

Jean Opsomer is a vice president at Westat in Rockville, Maryland. He was formerly a professor and department chair in the Department of Statistics at Colorado State University, as well as a faculty member at Iowa State University. His research focuses on shape-constrained and nonparametric methods in survey estimation and on several interdisciplinary projects with survey components on a range of topics. He is a member of Statistics Canada’s Advisory Committee on Statistical Methods. He previously served on the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Technical Advisory Committee, the USDA’s Advisory Committee on Agricultural Statistics and the National Academies’ Panel to Review USDA’s Agricultural Resource Management Survey. Opsomer is an elected fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and the American Statistical Association, as well as an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He holds a Ph.D. in statistics from Cornell University.

Greg Peterson is director general for Agriculture, Energy, Environment and Transportation Statistics in the Economics Statistics Field at Statistics Canada. Since joining Statistics Canada in 1990, Peterson has worked in many areas, covering manufacturing, culture and tourism, retail trade, and recently was director of the Investment, Science and Technology group. In that capacity, he directed the statistical program that measures science, technology and innovation, the digital economy, and capital spending, as well as building permits and property values. Peterson also leads Canada’s agricultural census, a program that sends out and compiles data from 250,000 questionnaires every 5 years. He holds a B.A. from Concordia University and an M.A. from Queen’s University, both in economics.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
×

Krijn J. Poppe is a senior economist and chief policy advisor at Wageningen University and Research. Poppe also manages various research programs for the European Union covering the food industry, including several studies for the Farm Accountancy Data Network. For several years, he co-led the European Union’s Standing Committee on Agricultural Research’s Strategic Working Group on Agricultural Knowledge and Innovation Systems. The Dutch government appointed him as a member of the Netherland’s Council for the Environment and Infrastructure. He previously served as secretary-general of the European Association of Agricultural Economists, of which he is a fellow. Currently he is involved in managing its journals the European Review of Agricultural Economics and EuroChoices. Poppe has served as chief science officer of the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture. He is a board member of SKAL, the Dutch Inspection Organization for Organic Farming. He holds an M.Sc. in business economics from Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Daniel A. Sumner is the Frank H. Buck, Jr., professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Davis, and the director of the University of California’s Agricultural Issues Center. He participates in research and teaching and directs an outreach program on public issues related to agriculture. Sumner has served on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, is a former assistant secretary for economics at USDA, and is a former chair of the International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium. He is also a consultant for farm organizations, government agencies, and firms and is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences and symposia. Sumner is a fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association and holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago.

James Wagner is a research associate professor at the University of Michigan Survey Research Center as well as associate director of the Michigan Program in Survey Methodology. He also teaches in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology and serves as principal investigator on several large studies; he is currently the chief mathematical statistician for the National Survey of Family Growth. Wagner was recently an invited summer scholar at the U.S. Census Bureau. His research interests include nonresponse error, quality indicators for survey data, and responsive or adaptive design. Wagner serves as associate editor of Survey Research Methods and Journal of Official Statistics. He holds an M.S. in political science and a Ph.D. from the program in survey methodology, both from the University of Michigan.

Jeremy G. Weber is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and the Department of Economics at the Univer-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
×

sity of Pittsburgh. He previously worked at the World Bank and at USDA’s Economic Research Service—where he produced numerous reports on farm income characteristics—and was an adjunct faculty member for the master’s program in applied economics at Johns Hopkins University. Weber’s current research focus is on energy, natural resources, and agricultural economics; and he has published more than a dozen articles in journals such as Energy Economics, Resource and Energy Economics, World Development, Land Economics, and the American Journal of Agricultural Economics. He holds a Ph.D. in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
×
Page 179
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
×
Page 180
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
×
Page 181
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
×
Page 182
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
×
Page 183
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving Data Collection and Measurement of Complex Farms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25260.
×
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America’s farms and farmers are integral to the U.S. economy and, more broadly, to the nation’s social and cultural fabric. A healthy agricultural sector helps ensure a safe and reliable food supply, improves energy security, and contributes to employment and economic development, traditionally in small towns and rural areas where farming serves as a nexus for related sectors from farm machinery manufacturing to food processing. The agricultural sector also plays a role in the nation’s overall economic growth by providing crucial raw inputs for the production of a wide range of goods and services, including many that generate substantial export value.

If the agricultural sector is to be accurately understood and the policies that affect its functioning are to remain well informed, the statistical system’s data collection programs must be periodically revisited to ensure they are keeping up with current realities. This report reviews current information and makes recommendations to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) and Economic Research Service (ERS) to help identify effective methods for collecting data and reporting information about American agriculture, given increased complexity and other changes in farm business structure in recent decades.

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