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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Harnessing Mobile Devices for Nervous System Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25274.
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A

References

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Harnessing Mobile Devices for Nervous System Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25274.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Harnessing Mobile Devices for Nervous System Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25274.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Harnessing Mobile Devices for Nervous System Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25274.
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Romero, K., K. Ito, J. A. Rogers, D. Polhamus, R. Qiu, D. Stephenson, R. Mohs, R. Lalonde, V. Sinha, Y. Wang, D. Brown, M. Isaac, S. Vamvakas, R. Hemmings, L. Pani, L. J. Bain, and B. Corrigan. 2015. The future is now: Model-based clinical trial design for Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics 97(3):210-214.

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Harnessing Mobile Devices for Nervous System Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25274.
×
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Harnessing Mobile Devices for Nervous System Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25274.
×
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Harnessing Mobile Devices for Nervous System Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25274.
×
Page 57
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Harnessing Mobile Devices for Nervous System Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25274.
×
Page 58
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Harnessing Mobile Devices for Nervous System Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
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The critical importance of using mobile technology is clear to anyone in the health professions, particularly those who treat people with central nervous system (CNS) disorders. To explore current developments and opportunities for using mobile technology to advance research and treatment of CNS disorders, the National Academies’ Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders hosted a workshop in June 5–6, 2018. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions at the workshop.

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