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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Methods to Foster Transparency and Reproducibility of Federal Statistics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25305.
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Appendix A

Workshop Agenda

Transparency and Reproducibility of Federal Statistics

June 21–22, 2017
Keck Center, Room 201
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001

DAY 1, JUNE 21, 2017

9:00–9:10 am

Introduction from Sponsor, Amy Friedlander (NSF)

9:10–9:45 am

Views of Transparency from AAPOR and OMB

Chair: Graham Kalton (Steering Committee member)

AAPOR Transparency Initiative: Peter Miller (U.S. Census Bureau)

Relevant OMB Directives: Brian Harris-Kojetin (CNSTAT)

9:45–11:00 am

Benefits and Costs of Transparency: Views from Agencies

What Are the Benefits? What Are the Costs? What Does the Future Look Like in Terms of Threats by Private Competitors?

Chair: Susan Offutt (Steering Committee member)

Jennifer Madans (National Center for Health Statistics)

Sally Thompson (Bureau of Economic Analysis)

John Eltinge (U.S. Census Bureau)

11:00–11:15 am Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Methods to Foster Transparency and Reproducibility of Federal Statistics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25305.
×
11:15 am–12:15 pm

Foreign View of Benefits and Costs, and Approaches Used for Transparency

Chair: Bill Eddy (Steering Committee chair)

Peter Brodie (UK Office for National Statistics)

Sarah Henry (UK Office for National Statistics)

12:15–1:15 pm

Lunch

1:15–2:15 pm

Eric Rancourt (Statistics Canada)

Floor Discussion

2:15–3:00 pm

Case Studies: What Goes on Now Regarding Transparency?

Chair: Susan Offutt (Steering Committee member)

SAIPE: Wesley Basel (U.S. Census Bureau)

LEHD: Robert Sienkiewicz (U.S. Census Bureau)

3:00–4:30 pm

What Does Transparency (and Reproducibility) Mean Operationally?

Chair: Audris Mockus (Steering Committee member)

Internal to an Agency—Reproducibility Technology Transfer

John Eltinge (U.S. Census Bureau)

Input Data Sources (Survey Data, Administrative Records Data, Other Sources)
Ability to Access Internally Archived Datasets Used to Generate Major Releases; Retention of Paradata to Enhance Value of Archived Survey Data; Assessment of Quality; Error Profiles; Retention of Paradata for Administrative Data—What Does That Mean? Quality Profiles for Administrative Data; the Use of Surveys for Assessing the Quality of Administrative Data; Standards for the Use of Administrative Records for Statistical Purposes; Some Facility for Experts to Operate Internally

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Methods to Foster Transparency and Reproducibility of Federal Statistics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25305.
×

Documentation of Methods
Can Get Much More Detailed Since Internal SAS; R Heavily Commented Code;
Can Get into Current Editing; Imputation, Weighting, etc.; Procedures Being Able to Recreate the History of Changes to These Algorithms over Time

External to an Agency—Building Trust, Benefits from Crowd Sourcing

Ruth Ann Killion (U.S. Census Bureau)

Audris Mockus (University of Tennessee)

Input Data Sources
PUMS, Anything else? PUMS for Administrative Records? Research Data Centers?

Documentation of Methods
Summary for General Analyst versus Availability of Commented Code But What to Run It On?
Not for Editing, Imputation but for Some Workflow History? How Crowd Sourcing Would Operate; How to Evaluate Suggestions; Very Time Intensive; Some Governance Necessary

4:30–4:50 pm Break
4:50–5:10 pm

Making Confidential Data Part of Reproducible Research

Lars Vilhuber (Cornell University)

5:10–5:30 pm

What Does Reproducibility Mean for Federal Statistics: An Academic’s Perspective

H.V. Jagadish (University of Michigan)

5:30 pm

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Methods to Foster Transparency and Reproducibility of Federal Statistics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25305.
×

DAY 2, JUNE 22, 2017

9:00–9:30 am

Summary of Where We Are So Far

John Abowd (U.S. Census Bureau)

9:30–11:20 am

Improving Transparency of Statistical Data with Standards for Metadata and Work Processes

Chair: Bill Eddy (Steering Committee chair)

Automating the Capture of Data Transformation Metadata

H.V. Jagadish (University of Michigan)

Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) Daniel Gillman (BLS)

Statistical Data and Metadata eXchange (SDMX) David Barraclough (OECD)

Generic Statistical Information Model (GSIM) Michaela Denk (IMF)

Generic Statistical Business Process Model (GSBPM) Juan Muñoz Lopez (INEGI)

11:20 am–12:30 pm

Building Trust: Summary of Workshop
Topics: Benefits Due to Crowd Sourcing; Need for Governance; What Tools Look Most Promising? Outreach to the Public; Outreach to Analysts; Transparency Will Bring Criticism (valid and invalid); Will Demand Additional Resources Both to Create the Archival and Documentation and to Interact with the Users; What Is Feasible and What May Not Be?

Panel Discussion:
Hermann Habermann (CNSTAT)
Tom Louis (Johns Hopkins University)
John Abowd (U.S. Census Bureau)
Bill Eddy (Carnegie Mellon University)

12:30–1:30 pm

Working Lunch to Continue Morning Discussion

1:30 pm

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Methods to Foster Transparency and Reproducibility of Federal Statistics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25305.
×
Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Methods to Foster Transparency and Reproducibility of Federal Statistics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25305.
×
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Methods to Foster Transparency and Reproducibility of Federal Statistics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25305.
×
Page 109
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Methods to Foster Transparency and Reproducibility of Federal Statistics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25305.
×
Page 110
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In 2014 the National Science Foundation (NSF) provided support to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine for a series of Forums on Open Science in response to a government-wide directive to support increased public access to the results of research funded by the federal government. However, the breadth of the work resulting from the series precluded a focus on any specific topic or discussion about how to improve public access. Thus, the main goal of the Workshop on Transparency and Reproducibility in Federal Statistics was to develop some understanding of what principles and practices are, or would be, supportive of making federal statistics more understandable and reviewable, both by agency staff and the public. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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