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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
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APPENDIX C

WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS

Ann M. Arvin, MD, is the Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Vice Provost and Dean of Research, Stanford University. As Vice Provost, she oversees Stanford’s 18 interdisciplinary institutes as well as university research policies, compliance with regulations concerning the responsible conduct of research including human and animal research, and the Office of Technology Licensing. Her laboratory research focuses on molecular mechanisms of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection and immune responses to this common human herpesvirus. Her clinical research seeks to improve the understanding of the developing immune system in infants and young children in the context of viral infections and vaccines. Her work has been recognized by election to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association of American Physicians and the American Pediatric Society. Her past and current national committee service includes the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Board on Life Sciences, the Director’s Advisory Council of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Committees including the Committee on Federal Research Regulations and Reporting Requirements, the Committee on Policy and Global Affairs, the Committee on Science, Technology and Law, and the Committee on Responsible Science. Dr. Arvin was chief of the Infectious Diseases Division, the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford from 1984 to 2006. She received her AB from Brown University, MA in philosophy from Brandeis University, and MD from the University of Pennsylvania. She completed her residency in pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and subspecialty training in infectious diseases at UCSF and Stanford University.

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×

Christophe Batejat, MSc, is the deputy director of the laboratory for urgent response to biological threats at Institut Pasteur, Paris. He has been working for more than 15 years on influenza and other emerging viruses as well as biothreats agents, in the areas of laboratory diagnosis, field missions, training, and applied research. His field of research is the survival of viruses outside their host, with a focus on the survival of influenza viruses in aerosols, on surfaces and in water, under different climatic conditions. He runs two biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) laboratories, one of which is being dedicated to the study of bioaerosols, and he is in charge of BSL-3 trainings in Paris. He has been part of many biosafety programs with on-site evaluations and capacity building in the Institut Pasteur International Network. He is involved in the Global Health Security Action Group Lab network, the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network, and the European EVD-Labnet project.

Sabrina Brizee, MSc, is an international Biosafety and Biosecurity Project Officer, at the Department of Environment of the Centre for Zoonosis and Environmental Microbiology at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM). She participated in various (inter)national projects in the area of biosafety and biosecurity, for example, for the Centre of Excellence and the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. She assisted in developing and observing national chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense (CBRN) field- and table-top exercises in the EU CBRN (Council of Europe (CoE) project 44, of which the main aim was to strengthen CBRN first response in Southeast and Eastern Europe. In addition, she conducted several biosafety and biosecurity capacity-building activities in the East African region, such as implementing the “National Inventory of Dangerous Pathogens.” Furthermore, in collaboration with colleagues from Public Health England, she trained 24 participants in Central Asia to become trainers in biosafety and biosecurity, which was part of CoE project 53. At the national level, she worked on a literature study concerning oncolytic viruses and the potential health risk for farm animals, but also developed a national biological field exercise for first responders aimed to enhance forensic investigation/procedures at CBRN contaminated incident scenes. She has recently been International Federation of Biosecurity Association (IFBA) certified in “Bio-risk Management,” by which she required competencies in the fundamental principles and practices of biorisk management, but also successfully completed the BLS-3 course that was provided at the RIVM.

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×

Giovanni Cattoli, DVM, PhD, is the Head of the Animal Production and Health Laboratory in the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)/International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. He has been previously positioned in Italy as Director of the Department of Research & Innovation and the Department of Virology of IZSVe (Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie), which include the FAO and World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Reference Laboratory for Newcastle Disease and Avian Influenza, the FAO Reference Centre for Rabies, the OIE Reference Laboratory on fish betanodavirus, and the OIE Collaborating Centre for Diseases at the Human-Animal Interface. In his current position, Cattoli is leading groups working on nuclear and nuclear-derived applications for the development, validation, and application of rapid and innovative diagnostic methods for animal and zoonotic infectious diseases, the development of new vaccines and vaccination strategies for animal infectious diseases, research on pathogenesis, immunology and molecular epidemiology of animal and zoonotic pathogens, animal genetics to improve livestock productions, and disease resistance. He is directly involved in managing several international capacity building and technology transfer activities. He is author or co-author of more than 300 publications including peer-reviewed manuscripts, book chapters, proceeding of conferences and abstracts.

Charles Chiu, MD, PhD, is an associate professor in Laboratory Medicine and Medicine, Infectious Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He is also the director of UCSF-Abbott Viral Diagnostics and Discovery Center and associate director of the UCSF Clinical Microbiology Laboratory. Chiu heads a translational research laboratory engaged in next-generation sequencing approaches for diagnosis of infectious diseases, pathogen discovery, bioinformatics software development analysis, nanopore sequencing, and characterization of emerging infections (Lyme disease, enterovirus D68, Ebola virus, and Zika virus). His work is supported by research grants from the National Institutes of Health, Abbott Laboratories, bioMerieux, Global Lyme Alliance, philanthropic organizations (Sandler, Bowes, Marcus, Charles and Helen Schwab, and Steve and Alexandra Cohen Foundations), and the California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine. Chiu collaborates with partners around the world to sequence pathogens from emergent infectious disease outbreaks. He previously served on the National Academies Committee on Polymerase Chain Reaction Standards for the BioWatch Program. Chiu obtained an MD and PhD in biophysics

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×

from the University of California, Los Angeles, and subsequently completed an residency, fellowship, and postdoctoral research at UCSF. He has authored more than 80 peer-reviewed publications, holds more than 15 patents and patent applications, and serves on the scientific advisory boards for Therabio, Inc.

John Paul Clark is an epidemiologist and health planner. He is the coordinator of the World Bank’s Regional Disease Surveillance Systems Enhancement Program and provides technical leadership in the areas of maternal and child health and communicable diseases. Prior to joining the World Bank in 2006, Clark held senior positions at the World Health Organization, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and USAID. Over the past 30 years, he has made numerous contributions to public health research, policy, and practice and has led innovative multisector and cross-border efforts to reduce poverty and foster economic development through disease prevention, control and elimination. Clark holds advanced degrees from the Johns Hopkins University and the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Nancy D. Connell, PhD, is a professor and director in the Division of Infectious Disease in the Department of Medicine at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), New Jersey Medical School. A Harvard University PhD in microbiology, Connell’s major research focus is the interaction between respiratory infectious agents, such as M. tuberculosis and B. anthracis, and the macrophage. She is director of the biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) facility of UMDNJ’s Center for the Study of Emerging and Re-emerging Pathogens and chairs the University’s Institutional Biosafety Committee. Connell has served on or chaired numerous NIH review panels. She has served on more than 15 committees of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including the Committee to Review the Scientific Approaches used in the FBI’s Investigation of the 2001 Bacillus anthracis Mailings (2011). Dr. Connell chairs the National Academies Standing Committee for Faculty Development for Education about Research with Dual Use Issues in the Context of Responsible Science and Research Integrity, which has directed sustainable training workshops held across the Middle East and North Africa. Connell was recently appointed to the National Academies Board on Life Sciences and received the 2017 Outstanding Scientist Award from the Edward J. Ill, M.D. Excellence in Medicine Awards.

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×

David R. Franz, DVM, PhD, served in the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command for 23 of 27 years on active duty and retired as colonel. He served as Commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and as Deputy Commander of the Medical Research and Materiel Command. Prior to joining the Command, he served as group veterinarian for the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Franz was the chief inspector on three United Nations Special Commission biological warfare inspection missions to Iraq and served as technical advisor on long-term monitoring. He also served as a member of the first two U.S.-U.K. teams that visited Russia in support of the Trilateral Joint Statement on Biological Weapons and as a member of the Trilateral Experts’ Committee for biological weapons negotiations. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on International Security and Arms Control. He previously served on the Board on Life Sciences and the Department of Health and Human Services National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity. Franz also co-chaired the National Academies’ Committee on Strengthening and Expanding the Department of Defense Cooperative Threat Reduction Program. He serves on the Board of Integrated Nano-Technologies, LLC. Franz holds a DVM from Kansas State University and a PhD in physiology from Baylor College of Medicine.

David Harper, PhD, is the Managing Director of Harper Public Health Consulting Limited. He is also Senior Consulting Fellow at the Chatham House Centre on Global Health Security. Previously, Harper was Special Adviser to the Assistant Director-General for Health Security and Environment at the World Health Organization in Geneva, where his principal role was to advise on Global Preparedness for Health Security. Before March 2012, Harper was the Chief Scientist and Director General for Health Improvement and Protection in the UK Department of Health. He was responsible for protecting the population from risks posed by infectious diseases and environmental hazards; preparing for, and responding to, a range of health emergencies and disruptive challenges to health services; reducing the burden of conditions associated with poor lifestyles; and promoting health and wellbeing. He also held the international health and scientific development portfolios for the Department of Health. A scientist by training, Harper graduated in microbiology from the University of Dundee and gained his PhD in biochemistry from the University of Birmingham. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology, a Fellow of the Faculty of Public Health of the Royal College of Physicians, and an honorary Fellow of the Royal Society

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×

of Public Health. He was awarded the Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2002. He has honorary professorships at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Dundee, and an honorary Doctorate of Science degree from Cranfield University, where he is also a visiting professor.

Andrew Hollands has been involved in the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Cooperative Threat Reduction, Biological Threat Reduction Program (BTRP) for the past 6 years, working on the Southeast Asia and Africa portfolios. Hollands has led efforts to strengthen laboratory and field biosurveillance capacity across both regions. In addition, Hollands led training and policy development efforts to elevate country capabilities in biosafety and biosecurity for better alignment with international guidelines and best practices. Hollands is currently the Africa Region Lead responsible for engaging with countries for biosecurity, biosurveillance, and biosafety capacity development and developing the program’s engagement strategy for the continent. Prior to BTRP, Hollands helped to manage the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology, Chemical and Biological Defense research and development programs for national defense.

Mitsuo Isono, MD, PhD, obtained MD and PhD degrees in clinical medicine from Tohoku University School of Medicine. After engagement in clinical medicine in Oita Medical University, he started work as a senior technical advisor for the health sector in Japan International Cooperation Agency, the implementing organization for the official development assistance by the Government of Japan, since 2007. The main areas of works are infectious disease control, noncommunicable disease control, and construction of hospitals and laboratories. While working as TB program advisor in Afghanistan, he has engaged missions for those areas in about 40 countries in Asia, Middle East, Africa, and Central America.

Barbara Johnson, PhD, owns the consulting company Biosafety Biosecurity International. She is a microbiologist with more than 25 years of experience in the U.S. government and private industry in the areas of biosafety, biocontainment, and biosecurity. Currently, she develops site-specific risk assessments and mitigation strategies, assists in developing frameworks internationally to establish Institutional Biosafety Committees and support programs, reviews and develops designs for biocontainment facilities (A/BSL-2 through A/BSL-4 and BSL-3 Ag), certifies and validates containment laboratories, develops and provides

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×

biosafety and biosecurity training in the United States and internationally (more than 20 countries), and provides strategic and technical assistance in developing national-level and international biosafety, biosecurity, and biorisk management programs for conducting work with high-risk pathogens. She has served on several panels for the National Academies. Johnson is a Registered Biosafety Professional, approved BSL-3 Facility Certifier and Trainer by the Singapore Ministry of Health, past president of ABSA, Co-Editor-in-Chief of the American Biological Safety Association journal Applied Biosafety, past vice president of A-PBA, founding member of IFBA, and a past President of the American Biological Safety Association.

Kazunobu Kojima, PhD, graduated from Hokkaido University School of Medicine in Sapporo, Japan. He subsequently obtained a PhD from Sapporo Medical University for his study in infectious disease epidemiology. He was an Assistant Professor at its medical school, having studied and taught virology and epidemiology with particular research interests in rotavirus and poliovirus, including long-term field experience in Myanmar engaged in polio eradication initiative. Kojima has been in service to the World Health Organization for more than 14 years, starting from the Regional laboratory coordinator at WHO Western Pacific Regional Office (WHO/WPRO) in Manila, the Philippines. He moved to the WHO Lyon Office and then to Headquarters in Geneva in 2010, where he continues as the scientist charged with the responsibility for biosafety and laboratory biosecurity, including transportation of infectious substances.

Thomas G. Ksiazek, DVM, is director of high-containment laboratory operations at the Galveston National Laboratory and is a virus expert with 40 years of experience on the front lines of infectious disease research. Through the years he has worked on disease discovery and outbreak response efforts in Asia, Africa, South America, and the Middle East. Ksiazek is an expert in hemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola, and viral diseases. He is credited as being one of the co-discoverers of SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), which appeared in China in 2002. His quick work in identifying the virus is often credited as one reason why the disease was contained quickly. He is a three-time recipient of the Secretary of Health and Human Services Award. He received a Lifetime Achievement Award for Filovirus Science at the 6th International Filovirus Symposium in 2014, and in June 2015 he was named Distinguished Alumnus of the Kansas State College of Veterinary

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×

Medicine. In addition to serving as a senior staff scientist and director of high-containment operations, Ksiazek is a professor in the departments of Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. He served as the Chief of the Special Pathogens Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since 1991 after retiring from the U.S. Army as Lieutenant Colonel with 20 years of active duty service. Ksiazek earned his DVM in 1970, and then spent a year as associate veterinarian at the Adirondack Animal Hospital in Glensfalls, New York. He started his military career when he joined the U.S. Air force in 1971, holding a position that year as base veterinarian at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas. He then worked as chief of Veterinary Services, Royal Air Force, Chicksands, U.K.

Micah Lowenthal, PhD, is senior director for international networks in Policy and Global Affairs of the National Academies. He conducts and oversees a variety of international engagements and studies on nuclear, biological, space, and cyber safety and security. Previously, Lowenthal was a lecturer and researcher at the University of California (UC), Berkeley. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the American Physical Society (APS), and a past chair of the APS Forum on Physics and Society. Lowenthal earned an AB in physics and a PhD in nuclear engineering, both from UC Berkeley.

Craig Reed, PhD, received his BS in molecular biology from Vanderbilt University and a PhD in biochemistry and molecular biology from the University of Georgia. Following his doctoral work, he served as a Captain in the U.S. Army and was stationed at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. Reed is founder and chief executive officer of Inspirion Biosciences, an international consulting firm specializing in containment laboratory bio-risk management. Reed has supported the Departments of Defense, State, and Health and Human Services. He has worked closely with the directors and staff of more than 50 epidemiological surveillance labs and biological research facilities in more than 25 different countries to improve containment laboratory infrastructure, laboratory work practices and administrative controls, and other aspects of biosafety and biosecurity. He led and supported two European Committee for Normalization Workshops on laboratory bio-risk management. Reed is a Registered Biosafety Professional. He is an active member of the biosafety associations of Brazil, Africa, Europe, and the Asia-Pacific region, and served as President of the Chesapeake Branch of

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×

the American Biological Safety Association. He has served as an advisor to the International Federation of Biosafety Associations and the Biosafety Association of Central Asia and the Caucasus.

Masayuki Saijo, MD, PhD, is Director of the Department of Virology at the National Institute of Infectious Diseases in Tokyo, Japan. Dr. Masayuki Saijo obtained his MD and his PhD in pediatrics with Professor Yoshioka and Professor Okuno, Asahikawa Medical University, in Japan in 1991. He has studied clinical infectious diseases such as RSV infections in children and antiviral-resistant herpes virus infections in immunocompromised subjects. He joined the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan, in 1997, and has studied viral hemorrhagic fevers such as Ebola, Marburg, and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fevers. His research team is leading in the field of diagnostics and clinical aspects of emerging virus infections including viral hemorrhagic fevers.

Frances E. Sharples, PhD, is the Director of the National Academies’ Board on Life Sciences (BLS). She is responsible for the management of all BLS projects, maintaining their quality, tracking their budgets and deliverable milestones, and making decisions relevant to staffing of projects. BLS serves as the National Academies’ focal point for a wide range of technical and policy topics in the life sciences, including genomics, biodiversity conservation, bioterrorism, and key topics in basic research, such as gene editing. Immediately prior to joining the National Academies, Sharples was a Senior Policy Analyst for the Environment Division of the Clinton Administration’s White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) from October 1996 to October 2000. Sharples went to OSTP from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where she served in various positions in research and management in the Environmental Sciences Division between 1978 and 1996. Sharples received her BA in biology from Barnard College (1972) and her MA (1974) and PhD (1978) in zoology from the University of California, Davis. She served as an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Environmental Science and Engineering Fellow at the Environmental Protection Agency during the summer of 1981, and served as an AAAS Congressional Science and Engineering Fellow in the office of Senator Al Gore in 1984-1985. She was a member of the National Institutes of Health’s Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee in the mid-1980s, and was elected a Fellow of the AAAS in 1992.

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×

Jonathan Towner, PhD, leads the Virus Host Ecology Section within the Viral Special Pathogens Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). His team focuses on the ecology of high-consequence bat-borne viruses including filoviruses (e.g., ebolaviruses and marburgviruses) and paramyxoviruses with emphasis on (1) identifying their natural reservoir hosts, (2) determining the mechanisms used by these viruses to persist long term in nature, and (3) identifying the drivers that cause virus spillover to humans. In addition to his research, as part of a major public health agency, Towner responds when needed to viral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in Africa to establish and/or execute on-site molecular diagnostic testing. In this capacity, he has helped establish or operate field labs at four major filovirus outbreaks since 2000, including the CDC lab in Bo, Sierra Leone, that processed more than 27,000 human diagnostic specimens. He has been well trained in filovirus biology and ecology by leading authorities in the field including Drs. Stuart Nichol, Thomas Ksiazek, Robert Swanepoel, and Pierre Rollin. Towner received both his BA and PhD at the University of California, Berkeley, and has more than 25 years of training as a molecular virologist and 19 years of experience conducting virus research under BSL-4 containment.

Sapana Vora, PhD, joined the U.S. Department of State’s Biosecurity Engagement Program (BEP) in the Office of Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) as an AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow in 2015. BEP’s mission is to reduce the threat of bioterrorism by preventing terrorist access to potentially dangerous biological materials, dual-use technology, and bioscience expertise. As BEP’s Deputy Team Chief,. Vora oversees BEP’s annual funding cycle, helps shape CTR programmatic and policy strategies and projects, and participates in a number of interagency science policy discussions, including those on biological select agents and toxins, global health security, and other biosecurity issues. Prior to joining BEP, she was a Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy fellow and research associate at the National Academies, where she worked on the “Ovarian Cancers: Evolving Paradigms in Research and Care” consensus study. She holds a PhD in cancer biology from the University of Chicago and a BS in biology and English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×
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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×
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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×
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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×
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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×
Page 76
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×
Page 77
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×
Page 78
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×
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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND CONTRIBUTORS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Developing Norms for the Provision of Biological Laboratories in Low-Resource Contexts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25311.
×
Page 80
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On June 27-28, 2018, the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (the National Academies) convened an international workshop in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on developing norms for the provision of laboratories in low-resource contexts. The U.S. Department of State's Biosecurity Engagement Program requested that the National Academies organize this workshop to engage an international group of organizations that provide funding for construction, upgrades, and maintenance of biological laboratories in countries without the means to build such labs themselves. Twenty-one people from 19 organizations participated. The intent was to advance the conversation about the identification and application of guiding principles and common norms for use by these organizations in their grants, partnerships, and aid. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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