National Academies Press: OpenBook

Guidelines for Shielding Bridge Piers (2018)

Chapter: Chapter 6 - Implementation Strategy

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Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6 - Implementation Strategy." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidelines for Shielding Bridge Piers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25313.
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Page 90
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6 - Implementation Strategy." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidelines for Shielding Bridge Piers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25313.
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Page 91

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90 Implementation Strategy In addition to this report, the products developed in this research are presented in Appendix A: Proposed LRFD Bridge Design Pier Protection Specifications and Appendix B: Pro- posed RDG Occupant Protection Guidelines. These research products have been prepared with the goal of implementa- tion in mind. Dekelbab et al. suggest “a formula for successful product implementation multiplies three com ponents: effec- tive products, effective implementation, and enabling con- texts” [Dekelbab 2017]. These products have been presented in a format that can readily be adopted by AASHTO into the LRFD Bridge Design Specifications and RDG. The research team has presented the results of this research to the relevant AASHTO committees and stakeholders. During these presen- tations, the draft products were evaluated for their technical effectiveness, ease of use, and relevance to real field situa- tions. Stakeholders were informed of the background, devel- opment, and potential use of the guidelines. Additionally, some panel members provided draft versions of the research products to their DOTs for early evaluation and assessment, and the comments received from these early adopters have been integrated into the final products such that implemen- tation has already begun. The following sections summarize an implementation plan for the research products. 6.1 Products This research project developed the following two proposed guidelines: • Proposed LRFD Bridge Design Pier Protection Specifica- tions (Appendix A), and • Proposed Preliminary RDG Occupant Protection Guide- lines (Appendix B). Full implementation will necessitate adoption of Appen- dix A into the LRFD Bridge Design Specifications by the AASHTO Committee on Bridges and Structures (COBS) and adoption of Appendix B into the RDG by the AASHTO Committee on Design (COD) Technical Committee on Road- side Safety (TCRS). 6.2 Audience The primary audience for the guidelines produced in this project is bridge engineers, highway designers, roadside safety researchers, and policy makers. In particular, the AASHTO COBS may use the guidelines presented in Appendix A to update Article 3.6.5 of the LRFD Bridge Design Specifications, and the AASHTO TCRS may use the guidelines in Appendix B to update the identified sections of the RDG. These AASHTO documents are expected to be used in turn to update state bridge design and roadway design manuals and policies. 6.3 Impediments One possible impediment to successful implementation could be the mindset of designers, which would need to shift from the current warrant-based policies to risk-based guide- lines. There is a general movement toward risk-based evalua- tion processes that will help implementation, but there is still significant inertia with respect to methods of assessing pier protection. 6.4 Leadership The leadership of the AASHTO COBS and TCRS will be essential to the implementation of this research by the states in their bridge and roadway design policies. 6.5 Activities Continued presentations of these research products at AASHTO COBS, AASHTO COD TCRS, and Transporta- tion Research Board meetings is suggested to inform these AASHTO groups and the profession on the availability of these new guidelines. Regional workshops may be consid- ered to provide further background and target DOT person- nel and consultants who will be implementing designs with these guidelines in state bridge design and roadway design manuals. Finally, after use of the guidelines, a summary of C H A P T E R 6

91 pilot projects may be considered at an upcoming technical meeting to demonstrate the use of the guidelines by early adopters. 6.6 Criteria This project will have been successful if the guidelines included in Appendix A and Appendix B are incorporated into the LRFD Bridge Design Specifications and RDG and, sub sequently, into the design and evaluation procedures of the states. This implementation plan will result in improved pier pro- tection guidelines that better target scarce funding toward the most effective countermeasures and most at-risk structures and drivers such that the safety of the motoring public is enhanced.

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TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Research Report 892: Guidelines for Shielding Bridge Piers provides proposed load and resistance factor design (LRFD) bridge design pier protection specifications and proposed occupant protection guidelines. Bridge piers are generally close to the roadway to minimize bridge lengths. As a consequence, barriers are normally placed around piers to reduce the potential of vehicle crashes damaging the piers. However, the design and placement of the barriers may not have taken into consideration the possibility that vehicles, particularly large trucks, might still impact the pier. The report also includes four examples that illustrate the use of the proposed specifications and guidelines for shielding bridge piers.

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