National Academies Press: OpenBook

Using Existing Airport Management Systems to Manage Climate Risk (2018)

Chapter: Appendix B - Template for Communicating with Airport Executives

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Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Template for Communicating with Airport Executives." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Using Existing Airport Management Systems to Manage Climate Risk. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25327.
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Page 67
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Template for Communicating with Airport Executives." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Using Existing Airport Management Systems to Manage Climate Risk. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25327.
×
Page 68
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Template for Communicating with Airport Executives." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Using Existing Airport Management Systems to Manage Climate Risk. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25327.
×
Page 69
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Template for Communicating with Airport Executives." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Using Existing Airport Management Systems to Manage Climate Risk. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25327.
×
Page 70

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B-1 Before you can identify, develop, and propose strategies for climate change integration at your airport, you may need to build support. This appendix contains a blank template for com- municating about these risks with airport executives, as well as a completed version that you can reference for an example. Use the template on the following page to enter key information for your airport. Replace “<Enter text here>” with information specific to your airport. For examples of what to enter, hover over the text field on the blank template or see the “EXAMPLE” template filled out on the subsequent page. You can find the template online by searching the TRB website (www. TRB.org) for ACRP Research Report 188: Using Existing Airport Management Systems to Manage Climate Risk. A P P E N D I X B Template for Communicating with Airport Executives

B-2 Using Existing Airport Management Systems to Manage Climate Risk WHAT WE NEED TO KNOW ABOUT RISK Recent trends show that the frequency and the type of extreme weather events are changing, with impacts across industries , in both the near- and the long-term, but there are changes we can make today to manage these risks over time. and societies worldwide. New and dierent hazards pose a risk to in Boston, oodproof critical assets. irport Potential Near-term Risks Recent Trends and Observed Impacts < Enter Text Here > < Enter Text Here > < Enter Text Here > Benets of Taking Action HOW OTHER AIRPORTS ARE ADDRESSING CLIMATE RISK Airports of all sizes are starting to manage their climate risks, including airports in Boston, Istanbul, San Diego, Philadelphia, New York, and Toronto. FOR EXAMPLE: Massport (Boston Logan International Airport) in Boston, Massachusetts, assessed ood risks. From this, Massport set a new design ood elevation for infrastructure and began a process to systematically oo r f critical assets. In Canada, Toronto Pearson International Airport accounted for increased frequency and intensity of microburst storms in a hydraulic analysis for a new culvert and is evaluating the potential impacts of a new precipitation mix on deicing uid use and water quality. In Turkey, Istanbul New Airport, the world’s largest, built- in water and power eciency is expected to save around USD 8.5 million annually and create less dependence on local supplies. < Enter Text Here > Where to Go from Here? < Enter Text Here >

Template for Communicating with Airport Executives B-3 WHAT WE NEED TO KNOW ABOUT RISK Recent trends show that the frequency and the type of extreme weather events are changing, with impacts across industries , in both the near- and the long-term, but there are changes we can make today to manage these risks over time. and societies worldwide. New and dierent hazards pose a risk to Potential Near-term Risks Recent Trends and Observed Impacts Where to Go from Here? HOW OTHER AIRPORTS ARE ADDRESSING CLIMATE RISK Airports of all sizes are starting to manage their climate risks, including airports in Boston, Istanbul, San Diego, Philadelphia, New York, and Toronto. FOR EXAMPLE: Massport (Boston Logan International Airport) in Boston, Massachusetts, assessed ood risks. From this, Massport set a new design ood elevation for infrastructure and began a process to systematically oodproof critical assets. In Canada, Toronto Pearson International Airport on local supplies. • More frequent heavy rain events (up to 3 times more events with more than 2 inches of rain in 24 hours within the next 20–30 years) could lead to • More frequent drainage system failures and • Higher risk of environmental contamination. • Increase in heat waves (up to 25 days per year above 95 degrees Fahrenheit) – could lead to • Reduced eciency of outdoor sta due to need for more, frequent breaks, and • Risks to elderly travelers. • Increased risk of pavement rutting and shoving. • Save on maintenance costs for drainage system maintenance, pavement repair, and other weather-related costs • Avoid costly mistakes in drainage design for planned runway extension project • Maintain compliance with environmental regulations • Improve safety and security for sta and passengers • Runways were ooding from heavy downpours four times in the past ve years, and resulted in • 27 canceled ights, • $20,000 in clean-up costs per event ($80,000 total), and • $40,000 in lost revenues per event ($160,000 total). • Number of emergency response calls for workers in heat distress has doubled from the current 5-year period from the previous period. • Observed 10% increase in cooling costs over past 5 years. • Create airport policy to require all new infrastructure designs to incorporate future precipitation projections. • When emergency management plan is due for update this spring, ensure extreme heat is adequately captured. • Follow the ACRP Handbook to integrate climate risks into the asset management system. • Continue to track and analyze ood frequency and frequency of heat-related issues. • Distribute climate change projection information to all departments. EXA MPL E accounted for increased frequency and intensity of microburst storms in a hydraulic analysis for a new culvert and is evaluating the potential impacts of a new precipitation mix on deicing uid use and water quality. In Turkey, Istanbul New Airport, the world’s largest, built-in < Enter Text Here > Benets of Taking Action water and power eciency is expected to save around USD 8.5 million annually and create less dependence

Next: Appendix C - Data Metrics to Monitor »
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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 188: Using Existing Airport Management Systems to Manage Climate Risk integrates current and projected climate change related risks into airport management systems and planning. The handbook identifies ways to reduce airport vulnerabilities to current and projected impacts of climate change, including extreme weather events. It also explores ways to minimize long-term costs to airport facilities and operations. This handbook provides a detailed guide for integration, as well as a self-assessment tool for determining the applicable systems for climate-related decision-making within the airport.

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