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Final Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research (2019)

Chapter: Appendix D: Bibliography of Previous Studies Consulted by the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Bibliography of Previous Studies Consulted by the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Final Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25331.
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D

Bibliography of Previous Studies Consulted by the Committee

NRC (National Research Council). 1984. Cooperation and Competition on the Path to Fusion Energy: A Report. National Academy Press, Washington, DC.

DOE (U.S. Department of Energy). 1985. Magnetic Fusion Program Plan, DOE/ER-0214. Washington, DC. February.

DOE Energy Research Advisory Board. 1986. Report of the Technical Panel on Magnetic Fusion. Washington, DC. November.

NRC. 1989. Pacing the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Program. National Academy Press, Washington, DC.

DOE FPAC (Fusion Policy Energy Advisory Committee). 1990. Final Report. Washington, DC. September.

DOE Fusion Energy Advisory Committee. 1992. Report on Program Strategy for U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research. DOE\ER-0572T. Washington, DC. September.

PCAST (President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology). 1995. The U.S. Program of Fusion Energy Research and Development. Report of the Fusion Review Panel. Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC. July.

DOE Fusion Energy Advisory Committee. 1996. A Restructured Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Washington, DC. January 27.

DOE FESAC (Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee). 1997. Review of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Detailed Design Report. Washington, DC. April 18.

DOE FESAC. 1998. Recommendations on the Nature and Level of U.S. Participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Extension of the Engineering Design Activities. DOE/ER-0720. Washington, DC. January.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Bibliography of Previous Studies Consulted by the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Final Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25331.
×

DOE FESAC. 1999. Opportunities in the Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Washington, DC. June.

PCAST. 1999. Powerful Partnerships: The Federal Role in International Cooperation on Energy Innovation. Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC. June.

DOE Secretary of Energy Advisory Board. 1999. Realizing the Promise of Fusion Energy: Final Report of the Task Force on Fusion Energy. Washington, DC. August 9.

DOE FESAC. 1999. Report of the FESAC Panel on Priorities and Balance. Washington, DC. September 13.

DOE FESAC. 2000. Report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity for the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Program. DOE/SC-0028. Washington, DC. September.

NRC. 2004. An Assessment of the Department of Energy’s Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Program. National Academy Press, Washington, DC.

DOE FESAC. 2001. Review of the Fusion Theory and Computing Program. Washington, DC. August.

DOE FESAC. 2001. Review of Burning Plasma Physics, DOE/SC-0041. Washington, DC. September.

DOE. 2002. Report from the 2002 Fusion Summer Study, “2002 Fusion Summer Study Report,” Snowmass, Colorado, July 8-19. Washington, DC.

DOE FESAC. 2002. Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Burning Plasma Strategy Panel: A Burning Plasma Program Strategy to Advance Fusion Energy. Washington, DC. September.

DOE FESAC. 2003. Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Fusion Development Path Panel: A Plan for the Development of Fusion Energy. Washington, DC. March.

NRC. 2004. Burning Plasma: Bringing a Star to Earth. National Academy Press, Washington, DC.

DOE FESAC. 2005. Scientific Challenges, Opportunities and Priorities for the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Washington, DC. April.

U.S. Burning Plasma Organization. 2006. Planning for the U.S. Fusion Community Participation in the ITER Program. June 7. https://www.burningplasma.org/web/ReNeW/EPAct_final_June09.pdf.

DOE FESAC. 2007. Priorities, Gaps and Opportunities: Towards a Long-Range Strategic Plan for Magnetic Fusion Energy. Washington, DC. October.

NRC. 2007. Plasma Science: Advancing Knowledge in the National Interest. The National Academies Press, Washington, DC.

NRC. 2009. A Review of the DOE Plan for U.S. Fusion Community Participation in the ITER Program. The National Academies Press, Washington, DC.

DOE. 2009. Scientific Grand Challenges: Fusion Energy Science and the Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale. Report from the DOE Workshop Held March 18-20.

DOE. 2009. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report from the DOE Workshop Held June 8-12. Washington, DC.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Bibliography of Previous Studies Consulted by the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Final Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25331.
×

PCAST. 2010. Report to the President on Accelerating the Pace of Change in Energy Technologies Through an Integrated Federal Energy Policy. Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC. November.

DOE FESAC. 2012. Materials Science and Technology Research Opportunities Now and in the ITER Era: A Focused Vision on Compelling Fusion Nuclear Science Challenges. Washington, DC. February.

DOE FESAC. 2012. Opportunities for and Modes of International Collaboration in Fusion Energy Sciences Research during the ITER Era. Washington, DC. February.

European Fusion Development Agreement. 2012. Fusion Electricity: A Roadmap to the Realization of Fusion Energy. November. https://www.euro-fusion.org/fileadmin/user_upload/EUROfusion/Documents/Roadmap.pdf.

DOE FESAC. 2013. Report of the FESAC Subcommittee on the Priorities of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Science Program. Washington, DC. February 10.

DOE FESAC. 2013. Report of the FESAC Subcommittee on the Prioritization of Proposed Scientific User Facilities for the Office of Science. Washington, DC. March 21.

DOE FESAC. 2014. Report on Strategic Planning: Priorities Assessment and Budget Scenarios. Washington, DC. December.

DOE. 2015. On Plasma Materials Interactions: Report on Scientific Challenges and Research Opportunities in Plasma Materials Interactions. Report from the DOE Workshop Held May 4-7. Washington, DC.

DOE. 2015. Integrated Simulations for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report from the DOE Workshop Held June 2-4. Washington, DC.

DOE. 2015. On Transients in Tokamak Plasmas: Report on Scientific Challenges and Research Opportunities in Transient Research. Report from the DOE Workshop Held June 8-11. Washington, DC.

DOE. 2015. The Office of Science’s Fusion Energy Sciences Program: A Ten-Year Perspective. Report to Congress. Washington, DC. December.

DOE. 2016. Exascale Requirements Review: Office of Science Review Sponsored Jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Fusion Energy Sciences. Meeting Report for January 27-29, 2016, Gaithersburg, MD. doi:10.2172/1375639.

DOE. 2016. U.S. Participation in the ITER Project. Report to Congress. Washington, DC. May.

DOE. 2017. Project Execution Plan for U.S. ITER Subproject-1. DOE Project No. 14-SC-60. Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences. Washington, DC. January.

Y. Wan, et al. 2017. Overview of the present progress and activities on the CFETR. Nuclear Fusion 57:102009.

G. Federici, et al. 2017. European DEMO design strategy and consequences for materials. Nuclear Fusion 57:092002.

DOE FESAC. 2018. Transformative Enabling Capabilities for Efficient Advance Toward Fusion Energy. Washington, DC. February.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Bibliography of Previous Studies Consulted by the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Final Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25331.
×
Page 199
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Bibliography of Previous Studies Consulted by the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Final Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25331.
×
Page 200
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Bibliography of Previous Studies Consulted by the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Final Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25331.
×
Page 201
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Fusion offers the prospect of virtually unlimited energy. The United States and many nations around the world have made enormous progress toward achieving fusion energy. With ITER scheduled to go online within a decade and demonstrate controlled fusion ten years later, now is the right time for the United States to develop plans to benefit from its investment in burning plasma research and take steps to develop fusion electricity for the nation’s future energy needs. At the request of the Department of Energy, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine organized a committee to develop a strategic plan for U.S. fusion research. The final report’s two main recommendations are: (1) The United States should remain an ITER partner as the most cost-effective way to gain experience with a burning plasma at the scale of a power plant. (2) The United States should start a national program of accompanying research and technology leading to the construction of a compact pilot plant that produces electricity from fusion at the lowest possible capital cost.

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