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Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf (2019)

Chapter: Appendix A: Open Session Meeting Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
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Appendix A

Open Session Meeting Agendas

These in-person public meetings held by the committee served as information-gathering sessions. They are listed in chronological order. The locations of in-person meetings are provided. Presentations that were made via the Internet at the in-person public meetings are noted.

MEETING 1

National Academies of Sciences, Room 120
2101 Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC
September 13, 2018

1:00 Welcome—Joseph Travis, Committee Chair
1:10 Context and Expectations for the NAS Study—Elsa Haubold, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
2:00 Considerations for the Science and the Potential Societal Implications of the Study Outcomes
What kinds of evidence do we need and use (at a minimum) to determine a species in consideration of evolution and hybridization?—Scott Edwards, Harvard University (by video conference)
What evidence do we have and/or need to help determine the taxonomic status of the Mexican gray wolf (e.g., ancestry, genetics, reproductive behavior, demography)?—Robert Wayne, University of California, Los Angeles (by video conference)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
×
What evidence do we have and/or need to help determine taxonomic status of the red wolf (e.g., ancestry, genetics, reproductive behavior, demography)?—Lisette Waits, University of Idaho (by video conference)
What are social and legal implications of/considerations for scientific deliberation about the taxonomy of extant species—Holly Doremus, University of California, Berkeley, Law School
Committee discussion with the speakers
4:00 Break
4:15 Public Comments. Members of the public are invited to share evidence and views they would like for the committee to take into consideration. Advanced sign-up is required.
5:00 Adjourn Open Session

MEETING 2: RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS ON WOLF BEHAVIOR AND GENETICS

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center, Board Room
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA
November 6, 2018

Welcome and Opening Remarks
8:00 Joseph Travis, Chair, Committee on Assessing the Taxonomic Status of the Red Wolf and the Mexican Gray Wolf
Approaches and Challenges with Determining Taxonomy: Salmon Case Study
8:10 Robin S. Waples, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Wolf Natural History and Population Dynamics
8:40 Douglas W. Smith, National Park Service (remote)
9:10 L. David Mech, U.S. Geological Survey (remote)
9:40 Break
Computational Analysis for Questions About Population Evolution and Genetics
10:00 Making inferences about unique and potentially adaptive alleles; and past population history and demographics
Graham Coop, University of California, Davis (remote)
Molly Przeworski, Columbia University (remote)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
×
Behavior and Genetic Analyses of the Red Wolf
11:00 Joseph W. Hinton, University of Georgia (remote)
11:30 Bridgett M. vonHoldt, Princeton University (remote)
12:00 Break for Lunch
1:00 Paul A. Hohenlohe, University of Idaho (remote)
Computational Analysis for Questions About Population Evolution and Genetics
1:30 Making inferences about admixture—Jonathan K. Pritchard, Stanford University (remote)
Genetic Analyses of the Mexican Gray Wolf
2:00 Matthew A. Cronin, Northwest Biology Company LLC
2:30 Richard Fredrickson, Independent researcher
3:00 Break
Public Comment Session
3:15 Advanced sign-up is required. Members of the public are invited to share evidence and views they would like for the committee to take into consideration.
4:00 Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
×
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
×
Page 80
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
×
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
×
Page 82
Next: Appendix B: List of Webinars and Solicited Expert Input »
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Scientists strive to develop clear rules for naming and grouping living organisms. But taxonomy, the scientific study of biological classification and evolution, is often highly debated. Members of a species, the fundamental unit of taxonomy and evolution, share a common evolutionary history and a common evolutionary path to the future. Yet, it can be difficult to determine whether the evolutionary history or future of a population is sufficiently distinct to designate it as a unique species.

A species is not a fixed entity – the relationship among the members of the same species is only a snapshot of a moment in time. Different populations of the same species can be in different stages in the process of species formation or dissolution. In some cases hybridization and introgression can create enormous challenges in interpreting data on genetic distinctions between groups. Hybridization is far more common in the evolutionary history of many species than previously recognized. As a result, the precise taxonomic status of an organism may be highly debated. This is the current case with the Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) and the red wolf (Canis rufus), and this report assesses the taxonomic status for each.

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