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Suggested Citation:"Part IV." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dietary Reference Intakes for Sodium and Potassium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25353.
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Part IV

Part IV of this report offers this committee’s perspective on knowledge gaps it revealed through its review of the evidence. This part of the report consists of one chapter.

Chapter 12 synthesizes the committee’s assessment of the evidence to identify where research gaps exist related to the understanding of potassium and sodium intake levels that are adequate, are toxic, and reduce chronic disease risk. The committee also describes its experience of undertaking a Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) study that incorporated recommendations from the 2017 National Academies report Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease and used an externally prepared systematic evidence review. Based on its experience, the committee highlights opportunities to enhance the DRI process.

Suggested Citation:"Part IV." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dietary Reference Intakes for Sodium and Potassium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25353.
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Suggested Citation:"Part IV." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dietary Reference Intakes for Sodium and Potassium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25353.
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Page 399
Suggested Citation:"Part IV." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dietary Reference Intakes for Sodium and Potassium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25353.
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Page 400
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As essential nutrients, sodium and potassium contribute to the fundamentals of physiology and pathology of human health and disease. In clinical settings, these are two important blood electrolytes, are frequently measured and influence care decisions. Yet, blood electrolyte concentrations are usually not influenced by dietary intake, as kidney and hormone systems carefully regulate blood values.

Over the years, increasing evidence suggests that sodium and potassium intake patterns of children and adults influence long-term population health mostly through complex relationships among dietary intake, blood pressure and cardiovascular health. The public health importance of understanding these relationships, based upon the best available evidence and establishing recommendations to support the development of population clinical practice guidelines and medical care of patients is clear.

This report reviews evidence on the relationship between sodium and potassium intakes and indicators of adequacy, toxicity, and chronic disease. It updates the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) using an expanded DRI model that includes consideration of chronic disease endpoints, and outlines research gaps to address the uncertainties identified in the process of deriving the reference values and evaluating public health implications.

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