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Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges (2019)

Chapter: Appendix C: Monitoring Parameters Required in Environmental Protection Agency 2015 Multi-Sector General Permit

« Previous: Appendix B: Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Monitoring Parameters Required in Environmental Protection Agency 2015 Multi-Sector General Permit." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
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Appendix C

Monitoring Parameters Required in Environmental Protection Agency 2015 Multi-Sector General Permit

Parameter Sectors Benchmark ELG
Alpha-terpineol Hazardous waste (K), Landfills (L) 0.033–0.042 mg/L, daily maximum; 0.016–0.019 mg/L, monthly avg. maximum
Ammonia Hazardous waste (K, K1), Vehicle maintenance areas and airports (S), Landfills (L) 2.14 mg/L (S) 10 mg/L, daily maximum; 4.9 mg/L, monthly avg. maximum (K, L); 14.7 mg/L as N, daily maximum (S)
Aniline Hazardous waste (K) 0.024 mg/L, daily maximum; 0.015 mg/L, monthly avg. maximum
Benzoic acid Hazardous waste (K), Landfills (L) 0.119–0.12 mg/L, daily maximum; 0.071–0.073 mg/L, monthly avg. maximum
Biochemical oxygen demand (5 day) (BOD5) Hazardous waste (K), Landfills (L), Food (U2), Vehicle maintenance areas, Air transportation facilities (S) 30 mg/L (S, U2) 140–220 mg/L, daily maximum; 37–56 mg/L, monthly avg. maximum (K, L)
Chemical oxygen demand (COD) Paper (B1), Timber (A1), Food (U2), Hazardous waste (K1), Metal mining (G1), Scrap and waste recycling (N1), Timber (A4), Vehicle maintenance areas, Air transportation facilities (S) 120 mg/L
Fluoride Chemical and allied products (C) 75.0 mg/L, daily maximum; 25.0 mg/L, 30-day avg.
Napthalene Hazardous waste treatment (K) 0.059 mg/L, daily maximum; 0.022 mg/L, monthly avg. maximum
Nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen Chemical and allied products (C1, C2, C3), Fabricated metals (AA1), Food (U2), Metal mining (G1), Mineral mining (J1) 0.68 mg/L
Oil and grease Asphalt paving and roofing (D) 15.0 mg/L, daily maximum; 10 mg/L, 30-day average
p-Cresol Hazardous waste treatment (K), Landfills (L) 0.024–0.025 mg/L, daily maximum; 0.014–0.015 mg/L, monthly avg. maximum
pH Metal mining (G2), Vehicle maintenance or deicing at air transportation facilities (S), Asphalt paving (D), Grass, clay, cement, concrete, and gypsum (E), Hazardous waste (K), Landfills (L), Mineral mining (J), Electric power (O), Timber (A) 6.0–9.0 s.u.
(G2, S)
6.0–9.0 s.u.
(D, E, K, L, J, O, A)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Monitoring Parameters Required in Environmental Protection Agency 2015 Multi-Sector General Permit." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Parameter Sectors Benchmark ELG
Phenol Hazardous waste treatment (K), Landfills and land application sites (L) 0.026–0.048 mg/L, daily maximum; 0.015–0.029 mg/L, monthly avg. maximum
Phosphorus Chemical and allied products (C1) 2.0 mg/L
Pyridine Hazardous waste treatment (K) 0.072 mg/L, daily maximum; 0.025 mg/L, monthly avg. maximum
Total aluminum Automobile salvage yards (M1), Chemical and allied products (C2), Coal mines (H1), Fabricated metals (AA1), Glass, clay, cement, concrete, and gypsum (E1), Primary metals (F1, F2), Water transportation facilities (Q1), Scrap recycling (N1) 0.75 mg/L
Total antimony Metal mining (G2) 0.64 mg/L
Total arsenic Hazardous waste treatment (K, K1), Metal mining (G2), Timber (A2) FW: 0.15 mg/L (K1, G2, A2)
SW: 0.069 mg/L (K1, G2, A2)
1.1 mg/L, daily maximum; 0.54 mg/L, monthly average maximum (K)
Total beryllium Metal mining (G2) 0.13 mg/L
Total cadmium Hazardous waste treatment (K1), Metal mining (G2) SW: 0.04 mg/L
FW: hardness dependent (dep.) (0.0005 to 0.0053 mg/L)
Total chromium Hazardous waste treatment (K) 1.1 mg/L, daily maximum; 0.46 mg/L, monthly avg. maximum
Total copper Metal mining (G2), Primary metals (F2, F3, F4), Scrap recycling and waste recycling (N1), Timber (A2) SW: 0.0048 mg/L
FW: hardness dep. (0.0038 to 0.0332 mg/L)
Total cyanide Hazardous waste treatment (K1) FW: 0.022 mg/L
SW: 0.001 mg/L
Total iron Automobile salvage yards (M1), Chemical and allied products (C1, C2), Coal mines (H1), Fabricated metals (AA1), Glass, clay, cement, concrete, and gypsum (E2), Landfills (L2), Metal mining (G2), Scrap recycling and waste recycling (N1), Primary metals (F2), Electric power (O1), Water transport facilities (Q1) 1.0 mg/L
Total lead Automobile salvage yards (M1), Chemical and allied products (C1), Hazardous waste (K1), Metal mining (G2), Scrap recycling (N1), Water transportation facilities (Q1) FW: hardness dep. (0.014 to 0.262)
SW: 0.21 mg/L
Total magnesium Hazardous waste treatment (K1) 0.064 mg/L
Total mercury Hazardous waste treatment (K1), Metal mining (G2) FW: 0.0014 mg/L
SW: 0.0018 mg/L
Total nickel Metal mining (G2) FW: hardness dep. (0.15 to 1.02 mg/L)
SW: 0.074 mg/L
Total phosphorus Chemical and allied products (C) 105.0 mg/L, daily maximum; 35 mg/L, 30-day avg.
Total selenium Hazardous waste treatment (K1), Metal mining (G2) FW: 0.005 mg/L
SW: 0.29 mg/L
Total silver Hazardous waste treatment (K1), Metal mining (G2) FW: hardness dep. (0.0007 to 0.0183 mg/L)
SW: 0.0019 mg/L
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Monitoring Parameters Required in Environmental Protection Agency 2015 Multi-Sector General Permit." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Parameter Sectors Benchmark ELG
Total suspended solids (TSS) Timber (A), Asphalt paving and roofing (D), Glass, clay, cement, concrete, and gypsum (E), Primary metals (F2), Metal mining (G1, G2), Coal mines (H1), Mineral mining (J1, J2), Hazardous waste treatment (K), Landfills and land application sites (L), Automobile salvage yards (M1), Scrap recycling and waste recycling (N1), Steam electric power (O), Food (U1, U2) 100 mg/L (A, D1, E2, F2, G, H1, J, M1, N1, U) 23.0–88 mg/L, daily maximum; 15.0–50 mg/L, 30-day avg. (D, E, J, K, L, O)
Total zinc Hazardous waste treatment (K), Landfills and land application sites (L), Timber (A1), Chemical and allied products (C1, C3, C4), Fabricated metals (AA1), Metal mining (G2), Primary metals (F1, F2, F3, F4), Scrap recycling and waste recycling (N1), Water transportation facilities (Q1), Rubber products manufacturing (Y1) FW: hardness dep. (0.04 to 0.26 mg/L)
SW: 0.09 mg/L (A1, C, AA1, G2, F, N1, Q1, Y1)
0.20–0.535 mg/L, daily maximum; 0.11–0.296 mg/L, monthly avg. maximum (K, L)
Turbidity Metal mining (G2) 50 NTU
Woody debris Timber (A) None >1 in.

NOTE: FW = freshwater; SW = saltwater.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Monitoring Parameters Required in Environmental Protection Agency 2015 Multi-Sector General Permit." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Monitoring Parameters Required in Environmental Protection Agency 2015 Multi-Sector General Permit." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Monitoring Parameters Required in Environmental Protection Agency 2015 Multi-Sector General Permit." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Monitoring Parameters Required in Environmental Protection Agency 2015 Multi-Sector General Permit." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Monitoring Parameters Required in Environmental Protection Agency 2015 Multi-Sector General Permit." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Page 100
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Industrial stormwater is derived from precipitation and/or runoff that comes in contact with industrial manufacturing, processing, storage, or material overburden and then runs offsite and enters drainage systems or receiving waters. In 1987, Congress significantly expanded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program through amendments to the Clean Water Act to include industrial stormwater runoff conveyed through outfalls directly to receiving waters or indirectly through municipal separate storm sewer systems.

The added regulation of stormwater in the NPDES program has been challenging. Stormwater is produced throughout a developed landscape, and its production and delivery are episodic. In 2009, the National Research Council released a comprehensive report on the Environmental Protection Agency’s Stormwater Program that covered all sectors of the program. This study builds on that report, with a focus on industrial stormwater monitoring and management.

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