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Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges (2019)

Chapter: Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
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Appendix F

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Allen P. Davis, Chair, is professor of civil and environmental engineering and Charles A. Irish, Sr. Chair in Civil Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Davis’s interests are in aquatic and interfacial environmental chemistry. For two decades, he has been investigating sources and treatment of pollutants in urban stormwater runoff with a focus on nature-based practices, particularly bioretention. In 2010, he was awarded the A. James Clark School of Engineering Faculty Outstanding Research Award, recognizing exceptionally influential research accomplishments related to urban stormwater quality, its management, and the concept of low-impact development. He is author or co-author of more than 120 peer-reviewed journal articles and a text on stormwater management for smart growth. From 2001 to 2010, he was director of the Maryland Water Resources Research Center. He is currently editor-in-chief of the new ASCE Journal of Sustainable Water in the Built Environment. He is a Licensed Professional Engineer in Maryland, Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), Fellow of the ASCE Environmental and Water Resources Institute, and a Diplomate, Water Resources Engineer. Dr. Davis holds B.S., M.C.E., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Delaware.

Roger T. Bannerman worked as an environmental specialist for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for 41 years. For much of that time, he directed research projects investigating urban runoff. Topics addressed by his studies over the years include the quality of urban streams, identification of problem pollutants in stormwater, toxicity of stormwater pollutants, effectiveness of different stormwater control practices, sources of stormwater pollutants, selection of cost-effective control practices, and benefits of low-impact development. He has applied these results to management plans developed for most urban areas in Wisconsin. This includes the calibration of the urban runoff model called the Source Loading and Management Model. The results of his research projects have been used to develop Wisconsin’s administrative rules that regulate stormwater management. Mr. Bannerman received his B.S. degree in chemistry from Humboldt State College and an M.S. degree from the University of Wisconsin in water chemistry.

Shirley E. Clark is a professor of environmental engineering at Penn State Harrisburg and chair of Penn State Harrisburg’s graduate programs in environmental and civil engineering. Dr. Clark’s research has primarily focused on improving the effectiveness of stormwater treatment systems. She has evaluated two manufactured treatment systems—inclined plate settlers and upflow filter systems—to document their performance for the Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Technology Verification Program. Her laboratory in mesocosm studies optimized bioretention media to treat stormwater runoff at Boeing’s Santa Susana facility, including determining media performance for removing pollutants such as dioxin and radionuclides. Her recent industrial stormwater research focused on determining the performance of various treatment systems (hydrodynamic separators, ponds, filters, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×

chemical treatment systems) in operation at multiple recycling facilities. Dr. Clark holds a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Washington University, an M.S.C.E. degree in environmental engineering, and a Ph.D. degree in environmental health engineering, both from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

L. Donald Duke is a professor of environmental studies at Florida Gulf Coast University. He has worked in energy efficiency, water quality analyses, and stormwater management for private consulting firms and served for 2 years in the total maximum daily load unit of the California Water Board, Los Angeles region. Dr. Duke’s research interests are in water resources including water quality assessments of natural systems; watershed-scale and regional-scale planning and management strategies; and federal, state, and local policies and programs for flood control. He applies quantitative methods and engineering analyses to environmental data as a means to assess public policies with the intent to assess effectiveness of environmental policies and decision making. Dr. Duke has worked with various federal, state, and local agencies on local and regional-scale management tools, including hazardous waste mitigation and stormwater compliance plans. Dr. Duke earned his B.S. degree in civil engineering and B.A. degree in English from the University of Pennsylvania, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University in civil and environmental engineering with a focus on resources planning.

Janet S. Kieler is the director of environmental programs for Denver International Airport. In this role, Ms. Kieler is responsible for directing environmental compliance and performance including environmental planning and analysis related to air quality, water quality, waste, wetlands, and endangered species. Previously, Ms. Kieler served for 11 years as the permits section manager for the Water Quality Control Division of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, where she oversaw the issuance of state and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit actions, compliance monitoring through field inspection and review of self-reported data, data management, and business processes. Ms. Kieler also previously worked for the Denver International Airport for 8 years, where she was responsible for industrial stormwater permit compliance, management of contracted operations to recycle captured aircraft deicing fluid, and planning and designing new infrastructure to support collection, storage, recycling, and disposal of spent aircraft deicing fluid. Ms. Kieler also worked for 6 years in environmental consulting. Ms. Kieler earned her B.S. in environmental engineering from Northwestern University.

John D. Stark is a professor of ecotoxicology at the Washington State University (WSU). Dr. Stark is also the director of the Washington Stormwater Center and a member of the Puget Sound Partnership Science Panel. He also runs the WSU Salmon Toxicology Research Laboratory. Dr. Stark specializes in ecological risk assessment of threatened and endangered species with particular emphasis on salmon and their food, and has conducted research on the effects of polluted stormwater runoff on salmon and aquatic invertebrate health. He holds a B.S. degree in biology from Syracuse University, a B.S. degree in forest biology from SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry School, an M.S. degree in entomology from Louisiana State University, and a Ph.D. degree in entomology and pesticide toxicology from the University of Hawaii.

Michael K. Stenstrom is Distinguished Professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research and teaching are in the environmental engineering area with emphasis on biological treatment methods and applications of computing technologies to environmental engineering research. Over the past 15 years, Dr. Stenstrom has performed research to characterize stormwater and minimize its impacts on the environment. Dr. Stenstrom’s expertise is in process development for stormwater management and wastewater treatment systems, including mathematical modeling and optimization. He applies these mathematical techniques along with statistical methods to urban runoff and stormwater issues. Through his research, he has developed several models for estimating pollutant discharges in stormwater runoff. Dr. Stenstrom received his B.S. in electrical and computer engineering and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental systems engineering from Clemson University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×

Xavier Swamikannu is an assistant adjunct professor at the Institute of Environment and Sustainability at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He previously worked for more than 20 years at the California Water Board, Los Angeles region, and served as its chief of stormwater programs, partnering with UCLA faculty to fund research and bring science into public decision making. His research interests include the progress of regulatory policy for water quality protection, its implementation, and effectiveness in the United States and California. Areas of focus include the potential water quality impacts of hydraulic fracturing, eliminating barriers to the implementation of green infrastructure, better understanding of the effectiveness of stormwater control measures, and standardizing water quality modeling methods for use by local governments in surface water pollution control planning. Dr. Swamikannu was a U.S. Fulbright Senior Environmental Leadership Fellow at the Government of India’s Central Pollution Control Board. He received his B.S degree in natural and chemical sciences from St. Joseph’s College in Bangalore, India, his M.S. degree in environmental sciences from Texas Christian University, and his doctorate degree (D.Env.) in environmental science and engineering from UCLA.

STAFF

Stephanie E. Johnson, study director, is a senior program officer with the Water Science and Technology Board. Since joining the National Academies in 2002, she has worked on a wide range of water-related studies, on topics such as desalination, wastewater reuse, contaminant source remediation, coal and uranium mining, coastal risk reduction, and ecosystem restoration. Dr. Johnson received her B.A. from Vanderbilt University in chemistry and geology, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia.

Carly Brody is a senior program assistant for the National Academies’ Water Science and Technology Board and the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. Prior to joining the National Academies in 2017, she interned with the Center for Transboundary Water Management at the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies. She received a B.A. in environmental science and policy and American studies from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Page 150
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Page 151
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
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Industrial stormwater is derived from precipitation and/or runoff that comes in contact with industrial manufacturing, processing, storage, or material overburden and then runs offsite and enters drainage systems or receiving waters. In 1987, Congress significantly expanded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program through amendments to the Clean Water Act to include industrial stormwater runoff conveyed through outfalls directly to receiving waters or indirectly through municipal separate storm sewer systems.

The added regulation of stormwater in the NPDES program has been challenging. Stormwater is produced throughout a developed landscape, and its production and delivery are episodic. In 2009, the National Research Council released a comprehensive report on the Environmental Protection Agency’s Stormwater Program that covered all sectors of the program. This study builds on that report, with a focus on industrial stormwater monitoring and management.

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