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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Professional Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing-Based Biomedical Research: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25356.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Professional Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing-Based Biomedical Research: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25356.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Professional Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing-Based Biomedical Research: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25356.
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Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Professional Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing-Based Biomedical Research: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25356.
×
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Professional Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing-Based Biomedical Research: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25356.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Professional Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing-Based Biomedical Research: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25356.
×
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Professional Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing-Based Biomedical Research: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25356.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Professional Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing-Based Biomedical Research: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25356.
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Page 70

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  Appendix B Professional Biosketches PLANNING COMMITTEE Co-Chairs: Dr. Saverio “Buddy” Capuano III is a diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medi- cine with 36 years of experience working with NHPs, 25 as a veterinarian. As a Primate Medicine Resident and Associate Veterinarian at the California National Primate Research Center from 1993-1998, Dr. Capuano assisted in managing daily husbandry, providing clinical care, and performing experimental sup- port for a large colony of NHPs (3,500 animals). As the Attending Veterinarian for the Pittsburgh Facility for Infectious Disease Research from 1998-2001, Dr. Capuano provided veterinary care for a large colony of macaques (200) and acted as collaborator and co-investigator on numerous protocols involving a variety of infectious agents (e.g., Simian Immunodeficiency Virus, Human Papilloma Virus, Human Influenza Virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Listeria monocytogenes, Pneumocystis carinii, and Trypanosoma cruzi) and transgenic vectors. As the Attending Veterinarian for the Magee-Womens Research Institute (MWRI) from 2001-2005, Dr. Capuano was responsible for the daily clinical care of the animal colony of the MWRI (250 NHPs, 2,000 rodents) and provided experimental support for numerous investigators per- forming reproductive, stem cell, and cloning research at the Institute. As Attending Veterinarian and Asso- ciate Director of Animal Services of the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center (WNPRC), Dr. Capuano oversees the veterinary, husbandry, and animal research support programs of the Center and de- velops policies for these units. Dr. Capuano also serves on the University of Wisconsin-Madison Graduate School IACUC and is a member of the WNPRC Senior Management Team. He is also the Director of the current ACLAM-accredited Laboratory Animal Medicine Training Program at the University of Wiscon- sin–Madison and served for several years on the Board of Directors of the Association of Primate Veteri- narians (President 2006-2007). Dr. James Fox received his veterinary training at Colorado State University. He was an NIH postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University before accepting a position at the University of Colorado Medical Center as an Assistant Professor. He was later recruited to MIT and is currently Professor and Director of the Division of Comparative Medicine. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Tufts University School of Veteri- nary Medicine. Dr. Fox has received numerous scientific awards, and was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2004. He has been the principal investigator of an NIH postdoctoral training grant for vet- erinarians for 28 years and has trained 80 veterinarians, physicians, and PhDs for careers in biomedical research. He also has a NIH training grant for veterinary students and has introduced over 120 veterinary students to careers in biomedical research. He has been funded by NIH and the National Cancer Institute to study infectious diseases of the gastrointestinal tract for the past 40 years and has focused on the pathogen- esis of Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter spp. infection in humans and animals. Dr. Fox has a longstand- ing interest in studying the gastrointestinal microbiome and how it interfaces and influences the host’s immune response to gastrointestinal pathogens, particularly Helicobacter species. These studies are com- plemented by extensive experience with mouse models, including those maintained under gnotobiotic con- ditions. His laboratory developed the ferret as a model for both campylobacter and helicobacter associated disease as well as the first rodent model to study helicobacter associated gastric disease, including gastric Prepublication Copy 63

Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing–Based Biomedical Research cancer. Dr. Fox is considered an international authority on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of gastric and enterohepatic helicobacters in humans and animals. He is largely responsible for identifying, naming, and describing many of the diseases attributed to various helicobacter species; most notably their associa- tion with hepatitis, liver tumors, inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. Members: Dr. Jaco Bakker, DVM, in companion animals. Immediately after graduation in 2002, he was employed at the Biomedical Primate Research Centre (BPRC), Rijswijk, the Netherlands as a veterinarian. At the BPRC, he was and is involved in general animal care, enrichment programmes, reviewing research proto- cols, disease monitoring (preventive medicine), new treatment options for the animals, breeding pro- grammes and public education. Over the years, he has worked with several primate species including owl monkeys (Aotus trivirgatus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), cotton top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus), cyno- molgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Although knowledge of primate medicine has increased considerably over the last decades, espe- cially in the field of welfare management, improvements can still be made. Jaco started a PhD programme aimed at further improvement of veterinary care and welfare management of marmosets, leading to the animals’ better health. In 2017 he successful finished his PhD at the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, titled “veterinary care and welfare management of common marmosets.” Apart from his projects on mar- mosets, he was and still is actively involved in research in the other nonhuman primate species at the BPRC to improve veterinary care and welfare management. On these topics he set up a number of (inter)national collaborations with veterinary groups, which have already resulted in various joint publications and invita- tions to present his research. Dr. Marina Emborg obtained her MD and PhD at the University of Buenos Aires. She did her postdoctoral training at Somatix Therapy Corp. and The Parkinson’s Institute in Sunnyvale, California, followed by fellowships in the department of Pharmacology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and the depart- ment of Neurological Sciences at Rush University, in Chicago. Since her graduate studies, Dr. Emborg’s research focus has been in understanding and finding solutions for neurodegenerative disorders, with an emphasis on Parkinson’s disease. Her body of work includes nonhuman primate models of neurological disorders, gene and cell-based therapies for Parkinson’s and the development of conceptual frameworks for ethical clinical translation of novel treatments. In 2004, she became faculty at the University of Wisconsin– Madison, where today she is Professor of Medical Physics and directs the Preclinical Parkinson’s Research Program at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. She is Editor of Neuroscience and Tissue Engineering Section for the journal Cell Transplantation, past President of the American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair and the 2016 recipient of the Bernard Sanberg Memorial Award for Brain Repair. Dr. Eric K. Hutchinson is the Associate Director of Research Animal Resources and an Assistant Profes- sor in the Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research focuses on the behavioral and physiological consequences of laboratory environ- ments for research animals, and how those may impact experiments. Dr. Hutchinson studied English and psychology at Georgetown University, then worked as an animal behavior and enrichment specialist at the National Institutes of Health Division of Veterinary Resources for four years before attending veterinary school at Colorado State University (CSU). At CSU, he worked as the enrichment coordinator for Labora- tory Animal Resources and conducted research on the effects of typical cage enrichments on the physiology and behavior of mice. He completed the laboratory animal medicine residency at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and became a diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine in 2012. He directed the behavioral management program at NIH’s Division of Veterinary Resources from 2014-2016 before returning to Johns Hopkins. 64 Prepublication Copy

Appendix B  Dr. James Pickel is a Staff Scientist, as well as, Chief of Transgenic Core Facility at the National Institutes of Mental Health, which was established when Dr. Pickel became the Chief. Since then the Core specialized in innovative technology (including developing new transgenic research animals) and collaborated with intramural, extramural, as well as international laboratories to advance transgenic methods. Dr. Pickel ob- tained his PhD from the Department of Microbiology University of Alabama at Birmingham. He also was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick Cancer Research and Development Cen- ter. Dr. Pickel is also a member of the Division of Veterinary Resources Advisory Committee at the Na- tional Institutes of Health. Dr. Erika Sasaki is Director in Center of Applied Developmental Biology, Central Institute for Experi- mental Animals (CIEA). Erika joined CIEA in April 2003 from The Institute of Medical Science (IMS), University of Tokyo where she had been a research associate at Division of Molecular Therapy. Dr. Sasaki was also faculty of Keio University from 2004-2018.She obtained her PhD in University of Tsukuba in 1995 and continued as a postdoctoral research fellow in National Institute of Animal Health, Ministry of Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries and University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada, until 2001, when she moved to ISM. Her current research focuses on establishing human disease models in genetically modified marmosets for preclinical research and assessing safety and efficacy of regenerative medicines in disease treatment. For this purpose, Dr. Sasaki has generated the world’s first transgenic marmoset with germline transmission in 2009. For the scientific interest, she is also studying early embryonic development in marmoset and gametogenesis in marmoset to understand the difference between rodents and primates’ early development. She has an extensive record of publications, invited lectures, and service activities. Dr. Sasaki has received several awards for her expertise and achievement in this area including Prize for Sci- ence and Technology by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and the Andoh-Tajima Award of the Japanese Association for Laboratory Animal Science. She is an organizing committee member of Japan Society for Marmoset Research and Asia-Oceania Research group for Com- mon marmoset. Dr. Suzette Tardif is the Associate Director of Research at the Southwest National Primate Research Cen- ter and the Co-Leader of the Preclinical Core for the Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center based at University of Texas Health-San Antonio. She received her PhD in Zoology from Michigan State University in 1982. Dr. Tardif has worked for more than 30 years in the development of common marmoset monkeys as biomedical models in diverse areas including reproductive biology, infectious disease, neuro- science, aging and obesity. She has extensive experience coordinating large, integrated research. She served as the marmoset expert for the team charged with sequencing the marmoset genome and also served as the species expert for recent studies on development of iPS cell technologies. Dr. Tardif’s research has centered on reproduction, metabolism, and behavior with more recent work extending to the characterization of the marmoset as a model for obesity, aging, and prenatal viral exposure. Her research has been consistently funded through NIH since 1984. SPEAKERS Dr. David Abbott is Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Senior Scientist at the Wisconsin Na- tional Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison. He brings 40 years of experience em- ploying rodent, primate and exotic species models of female reproductive endocrinology to determine path- ophysiological mechanisms underlying a variety of reproductive health disorders commonly found in women. He led one of the first studies demonstrating social dominance regulation of ovulation in a female primate, the common marmoset, leading to a series of mechanistic studies delineating sensory, behavioral and neuroendocrinological mechanisms that did not involve stress responses. Additional containment of female marmoset success was found to derive from avoidance of close kin mating and female-mediated infanticide. More recently, Dr. Abbott has explored the molecular underpinnings of female marmoset sexual behavior, to better inform therapeutic development aimed at ameliorating sexual dysfunction in women. Prepublication Copy 65

Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing–Based Biomedical Research Building on his knowledge of female primate ovarian cycles, he has collaborated to develop two rhesus macaque models for the highly prevalent infertility and diabetogenic polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women: fetal testosterone programming and naturally occurring hyperandrogenism. His current collab- orations involve knockdown of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) expression in the hypothalamus of adult female marmosets using viral vector technology. The aim is to establish ERα as the ER regulating meta- bolic, sexual and pituitary-ovarian function in female primates, including women, and encourage better targeted therapeutics for regulation of weight, sexual desire and ovulation. Dr. Maria Adélia Borstelmann de Oliveira is a Full Professor at the Federal Rural University of Pernam- buco–UFRPE, where she works since 1984. She holds a bachelor’s degree in UFRPE (1979), Specialist in Conservation and Management of Primates by the University of Brasilia–UNB (1985), Master in Physiol- ogy and Pharmacology by Federal University of Pernambuco–UFPE (1985) and PhD in Experimental Psy- chology from the University of São Paulo–USP (1998). Acted as Collaborating Researcher of Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison, USA (1993-1994) and Molecular Ecology Laboratory, Queen Mary and Westfield School, London University, UK (1994-2000). She is a founding partner of the Pernambuco Association for the Defense of Nature–ASPAN (1979), where she held several management positions, including Presidency (1990-1994). In the Brazilian Society of Primatology (SBPr) he held a management position in different management positions, including the presidency (2012- 2013). She has experience in the area of Zoology, with emphasis on Mammals, especially Primates, on Ecology, Physiology, Behavior and Conservation. Dr. Monika Burns, DVM, DACLAM, is a Senior Research/Clinical Veterinarian with primary clinical responsibility for the common marmoset colony at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, MA. Dr. Burns joined the staff of the Division of Comparative Medicine at MIT following completion of the MIT DCM postdoctoral training program in comparative medicine. Prior to her training at MIT, she received her DVM degree from the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts Univer- sity and completed her undergraduate work at Tufts University. Her clinical and research interests include primate reproductive biology and assisted reproductive technologies. Dr. Nancy Caine earned a PhD in Comparative Psychology at the University of California, Davis, studying large social groups of macaques. She did postdoctoral work at the University of Colorado Medical Center before taking a faculty position at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania. It was there that she began to work with callitrichid primates, doing controlled studies of their reactions to predatory threat. For the last 25 years, Dr. Caine has been at California State University, San Marcos, where she has continued her work with captive populations of marmosets housed in naturalistic environments, publishing studies on topics ranging from the function of color vision to group-mediated anti-predator behavior. She is interested in “translational ethology,” whereby our understanding of the evolved behavioral adaptations of primates can be brought to bear in captive management. Dr. Caine has served in leadership roles in both the American Society of Primatologists (President from 1998 to 2000) and the International Primatological Society (Secretary General from 2008 to 2018). Dr. Ricardo Del Rosario is a computational biologist at the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute. He leads the marmoset genome project, which involves the assembly of a new marmoset genome and whole genome sequencing of marmosets at MIT and Broad. The new marmoset genome as- sembly, its genome annotation, and whole genome sequences are needed by scientists working on genetic engineering in marmosets. Before he joined the Broad Institute, he worked as a research scientist at the Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS). One of his projects at GIS was to study the evolution of regulatory elements in primates. The marmoset genome was an important species that he used in performing a genome- wide screen for primate-specific constrained sequences. His work was included in the paper that published the marmoset reference genome. At GIS, he also developed a mathematical method to detect histone acet- ylation quantitative trait loci in human cohorts. These are SNPs that affect the acetylation levels of histones 66 Prepublication Copy

Appendix B  (as measured by H3K27ac ChIP-seq) and thus affect the activity of promoters or enhancers. His other ex- periences include a postdoctoral fellowship at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Germany, where he created mathematical models of the bioenergetics of an archaeon Halobacterium salinarum, and an As- sociate Professor position in mathematics at the University of the Philippines. He obtained his PhD in Ap- plied Mathematics from NC State University. Dr. Casey Fitz attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison as an undergraduate with a major in Zoology and Biological Aspects of Conservation. He went on to attend the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Veterinary Medicine receiving a Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine. Following graduation Dr. Fitz com- pleted an ACLAM approved postdoctoral residency in Laboratory Animal Medicine at the Wisconsin Na- tional Primate Research Center and University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. Dr. Fitz has worked with marmosets at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center for over 15 years. Dr. Yasuhiro Go is a Group leader of Cognitive Genomic Research Group and an Associate Professor of the Exploratory Research Center on Life and Living Systems (ExCELLS) and the National Institute for Physiological Sciences. Dr. Go received PhD from Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University in 2003, and did postdoctoral researches at the Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI) and Har- vard University. In 2008, Dr. Go became a faculty member of the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University and moved to the current position of National Institutes of Natural Sciences in 2013. Current research interest includes primate genomics, evolutionary biology, human evolution, computational biol- ogy, neuroscience, and cognitive genomics. Especially, current studies focused on the population genomics in macaques and marmosets for identification of spontaneous mutant monkeys in neuropsychiatric related genes toward establishing primate model for human neuropsychiatric diseases. Dr. Anna Goodroe completed her Bachelors in Biology and Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University. She completed a Clinical Laboratory Animal Medicine Residency at Johns Hopkins University and was granted the title of Diplomate from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. She has worked with common marmosets at both Johns Hopkins University and the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Dr. Takashi Inoue is Laboratory Head of Disease Model Animal Laboratory, in the Marmoset Research Department at the Central Institute for Experimental Animals (CIEA), Japan. He has been working on vet- erinary care and support of managing daily husbandry and animal experiments in the marmoset facility of CIEA since 2007. He is a diplomate of the Japanese College of Laboratory Animal Medicine since 2015. He received PhD in Veterinary Medicine from Graduate School of Hokkaido University in 2008. Dr. Jessica Izzi, DVM, MLAS, DACLAM, is an Assistant Professor and the Director of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery within Research Animal Resources at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. Dr. Izzi obtained her Master of Laboratory Animal Science degree from the Drexel University College of Medicine, received her DVM degree from the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts Univer- sity, and completed her postdoctoral training in laboratory animal medicine at Johns Hopkins University. Prior to returning to a faculty position at Johns Hopkins, she spent 2 years at NIH as a clinical veterinarian in the Division of Veterinary Resources. She has 5 years of clinical and surgical experience with marmosets and serves as the primary clinical veterinarian for the common marmoset breeding and research colony at Johns Hopkins. Kenton Kerns is an Assistant Curator at Smithsonian’s National Zoo’s Small Mammal House where he oversees the day-to-day running of the unit and cares for a diverse taxa of mammals. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biology from American University and has a master’s from George Mason University Prepublication Copy 67

Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing–Based Biomedical Research with a concentration in Zoo and Aquarium Leadership. In 2013, he was awarded Professional of the Year Award from the American Association of Zoo Keepers. He has published a number of articles of captive animal behavior in AAZK’s Animal Keeper Forum. He is vice-chair of the Association of Zoos and Aquar- iums’ Professional Development Committee, vice-chair of the Rodent Taxonomic Advisory Group, and steering committee member of the New World Primate Taxonomic Advisory Group, studbook keeper for golden-headed lion tamarins, and a board member for Save the Golden Lion Tamarin. Dr. Jan Langermans studied Biology at the University of Utrecht, followed by a PhD in Infectious Dis- eases and Immunology at the University of Leiden, The Netherlands where he worked on intracellular pathogens in vitro and in vivo in rodent models. In 1992, he became Assistant Professor at the Department of Infectious Diseases in Leiden until 1996 when he moved to the Biomedical Primate Research Center (BPRC) in the Netherlands to work on vaccine development for tropical diseases using nonhuman primate models. In 2003, he became Director of the Experimental Animal facilities of the Animal Sciences Group of Wageningen UR in Lelystad, the Netherlands and in 2007 Director Biomedical Research at this institute. He was involved in the care and use of small laboratory animals (mice, guinea pigs, rats, and poultry) and large animals (e.g., pigs, cattle). In 2008, he moved back to the BPRC to become Chairman of the Animal Science Department of this institute and in 2014 Deputy Director. He is responsible for the housing and care of the nonhuman primates at the institute and related research with respect to veterinary care, animal behavior and well-being and is involved in various research topics, including behavioral research and neu- rodegenerative diseases. Dr. Jon E. Levine, PhD completed his BA at Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio, and his PhD from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. Dr. Levine completed postdoctoral training at the Oregon Na- tional Primate Research Center & Oregon Health Sciences University. Levine joined the faculty at North- western University in Evanston, Illinois in 1984, and remained there as Professor in the Department of Neurobiology and Physiology until 2010. While on the faculty at Northwestern, Dr. Levine served as Di- rector of the Program in Biological Sciences (1999-2006), and as Director of a NIH-sponsored Training Program in Reproductive Biology (1991-2010). He is currently the Director of the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center and Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. For the past 40 years, Dr. Levine has studied the neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotropin re- leasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Dr. Levine’s research has also focused on the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which ovarian steroids exert their physiological and behavioral effects in the brain, includ- ing the negative feedback mechanisms that maintain homeostatic control within the reproductive axis, as well as the positive feedback actions of steroids that trigger preovulatory gonadotropin surges. His recent work has made use of newly developed mutant mice and nonhuman primate models to analyze the cell signaling mechanisms that mediate negative and positive feedback actions of estradiol, the role of steroid hormone receptors and kisspeptin neurons in the timing of puberty, and as the effects of estrogens on energy homeostasis and body weight. Dr. Levine has served as Editor-in-Chief of the journal Frontiers in Neuro- endocrinology, and as a member of the Steering Council for the Office of Research on Women’s Health at NIH. He is an active member of numerous professional societies including the Endocrine Society, Society for Neuroscience, and the Society for the Study of Reproduction. Dr. Joanna Malukiewicz is an incoming European Marie Curie Fellow working among the German Primate Center, Gottigen, Germany, Instituto Adolfo Lutz, São Paulo, Brazil, and UNIVASF, Petrolina, Brazil. Having her research based in Brazil since 2011, she studies Callithrix evolutionary biology using genomic, genetic, metagenomic, and morphometric approaches to better understand (1) how hybridization and divergence between closely related species affect genome evolution and biodiversity; (2) the potential of hybrid primates and their parental species as arbovirus reservoirs; (3) and the microbiome of primate hybrids, relative to parental species. Dr. Malukiewicz earned her PhD in biology at Arizona State University where she received a Fulbright Fellowship and NSF DDIG in support of Callithrix research. She has held 68 Prepublication Copy

Appendix B  previous postdoctoral appointments at the Federal University of Viçosa via a Brazilian Science Without Borders grant and also at the Biodesign Institute of Arizona State University. She is the current chair of the American Association of Anthropological Genetics Educational Committee. Keith Mansfield is Executive Director and Global Lead of Molecular Pathology at Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research. Prior to joining Novartis, Keith was an Associate Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School. He was Principal Investigator of a number of NIH grants funded through NIAID, NIA, and NIDDK and was a permanent member and Chair of the NIH Comparative Medicine Review Commit- tee. During this time, he was Director of a T32 NIH training grant in comparative pathology and mentored a number of postgraduate veterinarians. His research was focused on the experimental pathology of infec- tious diseases and he is author/co-author on more than 200 peer reviewed research publications. Since join- ing Novartis in 2011, he has led a molecular pathology laboratory utilizing precision models in drug dis- covery and development. He obtained his bachelor and DVM degrees from Cornell University and is currently an Adjunct Professor at the Cornell University School of Veterinary Medicine. He trained in veterinary pathology at Harvard Medical School and is board certified in veterinary pathology by the Amer- ican College of Veterinary Pathologists. Steve M. Niemi is Director, Office of Animal Resources and Lecturer, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University Faculty of Arts Sciences, Cambridge, MA. With more than 35 years of experience in biomedical research and commercial biotechnology, he has held senior management positions in contract drug and device development, biotech start-ups in human gene therapy and food animal genomics, and laboratory animal care and assurance. Dr. Niemi is a Diplomate and past president of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, and has served on numerous boards and national task forces addressing medical product development and lab animal welfare. He earned an AB in biology from Harvard College, a DVM from Washington State University, and then received a U.S. Public Health Service National Research Service Award while a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He later completed the Program for Management Development at the Harvard Business School. A collec- tion of his essays, “Notes in the Category of C: Reflections on the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals,” was recently published by Elsevier. Dr. Jean Patterson served as Chair of Virology and Immunology at the Texas Biomedical Research Insti- tute from 1996-2015. She is a member of the design team that completed construction of a 36,000-square- foot laboratory building that holds 12 Biosafety Level 2 labs, three Biosafety Level 3 labs, and one Bio- safety Level 4 lab. She is currently the Chair of BSL4 Task Force. Dr. Patterson’s main research interest is medical countermeasures for hemmorhagic fevers and animal models of Zika virus and she serves as Co- Chair of National Primate Centers Working Group on Zika Virus. Dr. Patterson is a member of the National Scientific Advisory Board for Biosecurity. Dr. Michael Power has been engaged in research on digestion, nutrition, and metabolism in marmosets and tamarins since my doctoral dissertation, and on milk composition since 1994. Over the past 20 years, he has been investigating the nutrient composition of milk from many species, ranging from Asian elephants to the pygmy marmoset. More recently, his research has expanded to include investigations of hormones and other bioactive molecules in milk and the milk microbiome. Dr. Power is the curator of the Milk Re- pository at the Smithsonian, which contains milk samples from more than 200 mammals. He is a Co-PI on NIH-sponsored research into the relationships between diet, digestion and health in the common marmoset. Jeffrey Rogers, PhD is Associate Professor in the Human Genome Sequencing Center and Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Dr. Rogers received his PhD in Anthropology from Yale University, and has worked throughout his career on the genetic and genomic analysis of nonhuman primates. Dr. Rogers has published 154 peer-reviewed scientific papers and serves as Chair of the Genetic and Genomics Working Group within the NIH National Primate Research Centers Prepublication Copy 69

Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing–Based Biomedical Research Consortium. He led the projects that produced the first genetic linkage maps for baboons and rhesus ma- caques. He was a senior member of the research teams that generated and published the reference genomes for the common marmoset, rhesus macaque, sooty mangabey, mouse lemur and other primate species. His laboratory has sequenced and analyzed the genomes of >700 rhesus macaques, identifying >70 million single nucleotide variants, as well as small insertion-deletion polymorphisms and gene copy number vari- ation. Dr. Rogers has applied this information regarding intra-species genetic variation in macaques and other primates to studies that identified novel genetic associations related to behavioral and physiological variation. He has also contributed to the discovery and development of several new primate models of human disease. Dr. Corinna Ross is an Associate Professor of Biology at Texas A&M University San Antonio and an Associate Scientist at the Southwest National Primate Research Center at Texas Biomedical Research In- stitute. She is also an adjunct professor at the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies at the University of Texas Health San Antonio. Her work integrates molecular, physiological and behavioral as- sessment techniques to explore mechanisms that influence developmental programming, health span and longevity in nonhuman primates. Dr. Ross has worked with marmosets for more than 20 years and has extensive experience designing phenotyping tools modified either from rodent assessments or from clinical geriatric assessments to assess marmoset activity, strength, feeding patterning, and cognitive function. Adam Shriver is a Research Fellow at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics and the Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities. Prior to Oxford, he worked at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of British Columbia. Adam’s research examines the intersection of ethics and cognitive science and he has written multiple articles about human well‐being and animal welfare. In particular, Adam’s research has examined the significance of the dissociation between the affective and sensory components of pain for philosophical theories of ethics and well‐being. To this end, Adam has written about the relationship between pain and pleasure, the legal and ethical questions that arise from the search for a neural signature of pain in humans, and the capacity for suffering across different species. He also has research examining the ethics of using genetic modifications in nonhuman animals. Previously, Adam organized a workshop on neuroethics and animals, and he is currently co‐editing a book on the topic. Dr. Afonso Silva received his Bachelor’s Degree in Electrical Engineering from Universidade Federal de Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil, and his PhD in Bioengineering from Carnegie Mellon University, where he worked on non-invasive MRI measurements of cerebral blood flow using the arterial spin labeling technique. He then went on to do postdoctoral training in the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research at the University of Minnesota, where he studied the temporal and spatial characteristics of functional brain hemodynamics under the supervision of Prof. Seong-Gi Kim. Dr. Silva joined NINDS as a Staff Scientist in 1999, and became an investigator in 2004. His laboratory combines modern neuroimaging techniques (functional MRI, and optical imaging) with electrophysiological recordings aimed at understanding the mechanisms of regulation of cerebral blood flow during normal and stimulation-induced brain activity. 70 Prepublication Copy

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The marmoset, a type of small monkey native to South America, is a research model of increasing importance for biomedical research in the United States and globally. Marmosets offer a range of advantages as animal models in neuroscience, aging, infectious diseases, and other fields of study. They may be particularly useful for the development of new disease models using genetic engineering and assisted reproductive technologies. However, concerns have been voiced with respect to the development of new marmoset-based models of disease, ethical considerations for their use, the supply of marmosets available for research, and gaps in guidance for their care and management.

To explore and address these concerns, the Roundtable on Science and Welfare in Laboratory Animal Use hosted a public workshop on October 22-23, 2018, in Washington, DC. The workshop focused on the availability of marmosets in the United States and abroad; animal welfare and ethical considerations stemming from the use of wildtype and genetically modified marmosets; and standards of housing and care, dietary needs, and feeding requirements for marmosets in captivity. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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