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Suggested Citation:"Appendices (Available Online)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Geotechnical Asset Management for Transportation Agencies, Volume 1: Research Overview. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25363.
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Page 36
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"Appendices (Available Online)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Geotechnical Asset Management for Transportation Agencies, Volume 1: Research Overview. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25363.
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Page 37
Page 38
Suggested Citation:"Appendices (Available Online)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Geotechnical Asset Management for Transportation Agencies, Volume 1: Research Overview. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25363.
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Page 38

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

36 Two appendix documents accompany this research overview. Together with the appendix documents and tools that accompany Volume 2 (the GAM Implementation Manual), they are available for download from the NCHRP Research Report 903 web page at www.trb.org. The complete list of documents and tools is: • NR903_V1_Appendices.pdf This file contains the two appendix files that accompany Volume 1. Appendix A summarizes the literature review prepared during the research, and Appendix B presents the outline used for the case study interviews. • NR903_V2_Appendices.pdf This file contains the seven appendix files that accompany Volume 2: – Appendix A: Using the GAM Planner, – Appendix B: GAM Inventory Start Example, – Appendix C: GAM Model Formulation, – Appendix D: Geotechnical Asset Condition and Level-of-Risk Examples, – Appendix E: GAM Asset-Level Net Present Value Framework Worksheet, – Appendix F: GAM Plan Outline, and – Appendix G: GAM Implementation Barrier Mitigation Strategy Matrix. • NR903_GAM_Planner.xlsm This file contains the spreadsheet-based (Microsoft Excel) tool. User information for the GAM Planner is provided in Volume 2, Appendix A. • NR903_NPV_Template.xlsx This file contains a spreadsheet-based (Microsoft Excel) worksheet template for a life-cycle cost investment analysis tool. The template supports the process of selecting project-level treatment alternatives in GAM and can be used for investment-based treatment alternative analysis that considers asset or project life-cycle costs including design, O&M, and any poten- tial rehabilitation or reconstruction treatments. User information for the NPV Template appears in Volume 2, Appendix E. • NR903_GAM_Training_Slides.pptx This file contains a slide-based presentation (created in Microsoft PowerPoint) that can be used during training for GAM. A technical memorandum on the implementation of the research findings also is available and can be accessed separately using a link on the NCHRP Project 24-46 webpage: http://apps.trb.org/ cmsfeed/TRBNetProjectDisplay.asp?ProjectID=4065. Appendices (Available Online)

Abbreviations and acronyms used without definitions in TRB publications: A4A Airlines for America AAAE American Association of Airport Executives AASHO American Association of State Highway Officials AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials ACI–NA Airports Council International–North America ACRP Airport Cooperative Research Program ADA Americans with Disabilities Act APTA American Public Transportation Association ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials ATA American Trucking Associations CTAA Community Transportation Association of America CTBSSP Commercial Truck and Bus Safety Synthesis Program DHS Department of Homeland Security DOE Department of Energy EPA Environmental Protection Agency FAA Federal Aviation Administration FAST Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (2015) FHWA Federal Highway Administration FMCSA Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration FRA Federal Railroad Administration FTA Federal Transit Administration HMCRP Hazardous Materials Cooperative Research Program IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISTEA Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 ITE Institute of Transportation Engineers MAP-21 Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (2012) NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAO National Association of State Aviation Officials NCFRP National Cooperative Freight Research Program NCHRP National Cooperative Highway Research Program NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration NTSB National Transportation Safety Board PHMSA Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration RITA Research and Innovative Technology Administration SAE Society of Automotive Engineers SAFETEA-LU Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (2005) TCRP Transit Cooperative Research Program TDC Transit Development Corporation TEA-21 Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (1998) TRB Transportation Research Board TSA Transportation Security Administration U.S. DOT United States Department of Transportation

Chapter 4 – Conclusions and Suggested Research 34 Chapter 4 – Conclusions and Suggested Research 4.1 Conclusions As a general conclusion, applying transportation asset management concepts to geotechnical assets is a beneficial process for managing the life-cycle risk, performance, and investment in assets such as embankments, slopes, retaining walls, and subgrades. Fortunately, information from the few long-term and sustainable GAM programs in other countries or infrastructure systems indicates that state transportation agencies can be confident of the benefits without having to undertake new research or implement untested processes and systems. It is certainly possible for agencies to start implementing GAM now regardless of investment capacity and expertise. For an agency to begin recognizing the benefits of incorporating geotechnical assets into transportation asset management, the primary goal should be starting GAM implementation and progressing inventoried assets through the TAM steps without delay. Evidence from the GAM programs that are currently realizing success of asset management indicates that benefits are possible without having to first complete the asset inventory or finalize all the processes and data systems that support implementation. Rather agencies can benefit from starting with a simple asset management strategy and relying on justified process improvements with time. This approach is preferred and supported by evidence from successful programs. In the case of Network Rail in the U.K., inventory completion took over 11 years and the first GAM policy document was not released until almost 6 years after the start of a program. The GAM Implementation Manual developed for this project is structured around the concept of enabling agencies to get started. This approach is intended to trigger engagement for performing GAM without needing a high level of motivation or ability. Research from across industries indicates that considering the components that contribute to motivation and ability for a new task is essential to increasing a likelihood of success. This is not a reflection on the individuals who may undertake GAM, but rather recognition of the challenges of implementing new processes and efforts into complex organizations comprised of individuals who already have high demands on time and resources. Once GAM has started and initial treatment recommendations are developed, geotechnical assets will still need to compete for investment among the other asset groups and programs of DOT. Thus, treatment planning is necessary to identify project-level options that incorporate the range of risk and investment priorities that are of interest to agency executives. The recently published “Guide to Creating and Sustaining a Culture of Innovation” (NCHRP, 2018) provides many helpful suggestions. 4.2 Suggested Research The objective of this research project is to produce an implementation manual for developing a geotechnical asset management program. Once empirical data obtained through the actual execution of

Geotechnical Asset Management for Transportation Agencies, Volume 1: Research Overview Get This Book
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TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Research Report 903: Geotechnical Asset Management for Transportation Agencies provides an introduction and scalable guidance for state transportation agencies on how to implement risk-based geotechnical asset management into current asset management plans. Volume 1, Research Overview, details the scope, process, and findings of the study.

The management of bridge and pavement assets has for many years garnered significant attention by state transportation agencies while the management of geotechnical assets—such as walls, slopes, embankments, and subgrades—has been elusive. Traditionally, geotechnical assets have been treated as unpredictable hazard sites with significant potential liability because failure of any geotechnical asset may lead to traveler delay, damage to other assets, or impact safety. Geotechnical assets are, however, vital to the successful operation of transportation systems and present an opportunity for system owners and operators to realize new economic benefits through risk-based asset management.

Appendices A & B to Volume 1 are available for download in a single file. Appendix A summarizes the literature review prepared during the research, and Appendix B presents the outline used for the case study interviews.

Volume 2, Implementation Manual, assembles the research results into guidance that should be of immediate use to those who maintain geotechnical assets including walls, slopes, embankments, and subgrades.

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