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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Page 157
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Page 158
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Page 159
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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References ABA (American Burn Association). 2018. Burn Center Regional Map. http://ameriburn.org/ public-resources/burn-center-regional-map (accessed January 2, 2019). Adalja, A. A., M. Watson, S. Wollner, E. S. Toner. 2011. A possible approach to large-scale laboratory testing for acute radiation sickness after a nuclear detonation. Biosecurity and Bioterrorism. https://doi.org/10.1089/bsp.2011.0042. Bean, H., B. F. Liu, S. Madden, J. Sutton, M. W. Wood, and D. S. Mileti. 2016. Disaster warn­ ings in your pocket: How audiences interpret mobile alerts for an unfamiliar hazard. Jour- nal of Contingencies and Crisis Management. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-5973.12108. Becker, S. M. 2004. Emergency communication and information issues in terrorism events involving radioactive materials. Biosecurity and Bioterrorism 2:195–207. Becker, S. M. 2007. Communicating risk to the public after radiological incidents. British Medical Journal 335(7630):1106–1107. Becker, S. M. 2009. Preparing for terrorism involving radioactive materials: Three lessons from recent experience and research. Journal of Applied Security Research 4(1):9–20. Becker, S. M. 2010. Risk communication and radiological/nuclear terrorism: Perceptions, concerns and information needs of first responders, health department personnel, and healthcare providers. In Radiation risk communication: Issues and solutions, edited by R. H. Johnson. Madison, WI: Medical Physics Publishing. Pp. 271–280. Becker, S. M. 2012. Risk communication and information in disasters and emergencies. In Local planning for terror and disaster: From bioterrorism to earthquakes, edited by L. Cole and N. Connell. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. Pp. 29–43. Becker, S. M., and S. Middleton. 2008. Improving hospital preparedness for radiological terrorism: Perspectives from emergency department physicians and nurses. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness 2(3):174–184. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. 2018. It is now two minutes to midnight. 2018 Doomsday Clock Statement, Science and Security Board. https://thebulletin.org/2018-doomsday- clock-statement (accessed October 3, 2018). Buddemeier, B. R., and M. B. Dillon. 2009. Key response planning for the aftermath of nuclear terrorism. Livermore, CA: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 155 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

156 EXPLORING PREPAREDNESS FOR A NUCLEAR INCIDENT Cancio, L. C., D. J. Barillo, R. D. Kearns, J. H. Holmes, K. M. Conlon, A. F. Matherly, B. A. Cairns, W. L. Hickerson, and T. Palmieri. 2017a. Guidelines for burn care under aus­ tere conditions: surgical and nonsurgical wound management. Journal of Burn Care & ­Research 38(4):203–214. Cancio, L. C., R. L. Sheridan, R. Dent, S. G. Hjalmarson, E. Gardner, A. F. Matherly, V. S. Bebarta, and T. Palmieri. 2017b. Guidelines for burn care under austere conditions: Spe­ cial etiologies: Blast, radiation, and chemical injuries. Journal of Burn Care & Research 38(1):e482–e496. Carrougher, G., K. Hollowed, J. Sproul, B. Wiggins, and E. Mann-Salinas. 2017. Burn nurse competencies: Developing consensus using e-Delphi methodology. Journal of Burn Care & Research 39(5):751–759. Corley, C. D. 2018. Public response cognitive modeling of the impact of wireless emergency alerts. Paper commissioned by the Committee on the Future of Emergency Alert and Warning Systems Research, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In Emergency Alert and Warning Systems: Current Knowledge and Future Research Directions (see Appendix B). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Dallas, C. E., K. R. Klein, T. Lehman, T. Kodama, C. A. Harris, and R. E. Swienton. 2017. Readiness for radiological and nuclear events among emergency medical personnel. Frontiers in Public Health 5(202). DHS (U.S. Department of Homeland Security). 2013. National response framework, 2nd ed. https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/20130726-1914-25045-8516/final_national_ response_framework_20130501.pdf (accessed October 3, 2018). DHS. 2016a. Health and safety planning guide: For planners, safety Officers, and supervisors for protecting responders following a nuclear detonation. https://www.dhs.gov/sites/ default/files/publications/IND%20Health%20Safety%20Planners%20Guide%20Final. pdf (accessed October 5, 2018). DHS. 2016b. Nuclear/radiological incident annex to the response and recovery federal inter­ agency operational plans. https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/1488825883577- fb52b6b7fd784dfb64aaee1fd886393a/NRIA_FINAL_110216.pdf (accessed October 3, 2018). DHS. 2016c. Quick reference guide: Radiation risk information for responders following a nuclear detonation. https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/Quick%20Reference%20 Guide%20Final.pdf (accessed October 5, 2018). DoD (U.S. Department of Defense). 2018. 2018 national defense. Unclassified summary. http:// nssarchive.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/2018-National-Defense-Strategy-Summary. pdf (accessed October 3, 2018). EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). 2017a. Protective action area map templates. EPA- 402/K-17/003 https://www.epa.gov/radiation/pag-public-communication-resources (ac­ cessed November 1, 2018). EPA. 2017b. Protective action questions & answers for radiological and nuclear emergen- cies. Companion document to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Protective action guide (PAG) manual. EPA-402/K-17/002. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/ files/2017-07/documents/pags_comm_tool_p9.pdf (accessed October 30, 2018). FDA (Food and Drug Administration). 2009. Strategic plan for risk communication. W ­ ashington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. https://www.fda. gov/downloads/AboutFDA/ReportsManualsForms/Reports/UCM183683.pdf (accessed October 31, 2018). FDA. 2011. Communicating risks and benefits: An evidence-based user’s guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. https://www.fda.gov/downloads/ AboutFDA/ReportsManualsForms/Reports/UCM268069.pdf (accessed October 31, 2018). PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

REFERENCES 157 FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency). 2009. Personal preparedness in America: Findings from the 2009 Citizen Corps National Survey. Washington, DC: Department of Homeland Security. https://www.fema.gov/media-library- data/20130726-1859-25045-2081/2009_citizen_corps_national_survey_findings___full_ report.pdf (accessed October 30. 2018). FEMA. 2010. Nationwide plan review: Fiscal year 2010 report to Congress. Washington, DC: Department of Homeland Security. FEMA. 2013. Improvised nuclear device response and recovery: Communicating in the imme- diate aftermath. https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/20130726-1919-25045-0892/ communicating_in_the_immediate_aftermath__final_june_2013_508_ok.pdf (accessed October 5, 2018). FEMA and DHS. 2010. Planning guidance for response to a nuclear detonation. https:// www.fema.gov/media-library-data/20130726-1821-25045-3023/planning_guidance_for_­ response_to_a_nuclear_detonation___2nd_edition_final.pdf (accessed August 27, 2018). Fischhoff, B. 2015. The realities of risk-cost-benefit analysis. Science 350(6260):aaa6516. Fischhoff, B., and J. Kadvany. 2011. Risk: A very short introduction. Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/actrade/9780199576203.001.0001 Fischhoff, B., and D. A. Scheufele, eds. 2013. The science of science communication. Special issue, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110 (Supp. 3):14031–14110. Fischhoff, B., and D. A. Scheufele, eds. 2014. The science of science communication II. Special issue, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111 (Supp. 4):13583–13671. Florig, H. K., and B. Fischhoff. 2007. Individuals’ decisions affecting radiation exposure after a nuclear explosion. Health Physics 92(5):475–483. GAO (Government Accountability Office). 2013. Nuclear terrorism response plans. GAO-13- 736. https://www.gao.gov/assets/660/658336.pdf (accessed October 7, 2018). Glik, D., D. Eisenman, K. Johnson, M. Prelip, A. Arevian, and A. Martel. 2018. WEA mes­ sages: Impact on physiological, emotional, cognitive and behavioral responses. Paper commissioned by the Committee on the Future of Emergency Alert and Warning Systems Research, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In Emergency Alert and Warning Systems: Current Knowledge and Future Research Directions (see Appendix B). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Griss, M., H. Erdogmus, and B. Iannucci. 2018. Opportunities, options, and enhancements for the wireless emergency alerting service. Paper commissioned by the Committee on the Future of Emergency Alert and Warning Systems Research, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In Emergency Alert and Warning Systems: Current Knowledge and Future Research Directions (see Appendix B). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Gurwitch, R. H., M. Kees, S. M. Becker, M. Schreiber, B. Pfefferbaum, and D. Diamond. 2004. When disaster strikes: Responding to the needs of children. Prehospital and Disaster Medicine 19(1):21–28. HHS (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). National health security strategy of the United States of America. https://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/planning/authority/nhss/ strategy/Documents/nhss-final.pdf (accessed October 3, 2018). HHS and ASPR (Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response). 2017. A decision makers ­ guide: Medical planning and response for a nuclear detonation, 2nd ed. https://www.remm. nlm.gov/IND_Decision_Makers_Guide_2017_guides.pdf (accessed October 6, 2018). IOM (Institute of Medicine). 1999. Toward environmental justice: Research, education, and health policy needs. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. https://doi. org/10.17226/6034. IOM. 2009. Assessing medical preparedness to respond to a terrorist nuclear event: Workshop report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/12578. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

158 EXPLORING PREPAREDNESS FOR A NUCLEAR INCIDENT IOM. 2014a. Characterizing and communicating uncertainty in the assessment of benefits and risks of pharmaceutical products: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/18870. IOM. 2014b. Nationwide response after an improvised nuclear device attack: Medical and public health considerations for neighboring jurisdictions: Workshop summary. W ­ ashington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/18347. Jeng, J. C. 2017. A quartet of American Burn Association clinical guidelines for austere con­ dition burn care: Gestation, collaboration, future impact, and post humus dedication. Journal of Burn Care & Research 38(5):e883. Kahneman, D. 2011. Thinking, fast and slow. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Kano, M., M. W. Wood, D. S. Mileti, and L. B. Bourque. 2008. Public response to terrorism: Findings from the National Survey of Disaster Experiences and Preparedness. California: Regents of the University of California. Kearns, R. D., K. M. Conlon, A. F. Matherly, K. K Chung, V. S. Bebarta, J. J. Hansen, L. C. Cancio, M. Peck, and T. L. Palmieri. 2017. Guidelines for burn care under austere conditions: Introduction to burn disaster, airway and ventilator management, and fluid resuscitation. Journal of Burn Care & Research 37(5):e427–e439. Klein, M. B., C. B. Kramer, J. Nelson, F. P. Rivera, N. S. Gibran, and T. Concannon. 2009. Geographic access to burn care hospital. Journal of the American Medical Association 302(16):1774–1781. Lasker, R. D. 2004. Redefining readiness: Terrorism planning through the eyes of the public. New York: The New York Academy of Medicine. Liu, B., H. Bean, M. Wood, D. Mileti, J. Sutton, and S. Madden. 2018. Comprehensive test­ ing of imminent threat public messages for mobile devices. Paper commissioned by the Committee on the Future of Emergency Alert and Warning Systems Research, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In Emergency Alert and Warning Sys- tems: Current Knowledge and Future Research Directions (see Appendix B). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Mars, R. E., W. C. Moss, and B. Whitlock. 2007. Thermal radiation from nuclear detona- tions in urban environments. UCRL-TR-231593. Lawrence, CA: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Morgan, M. G. 2017. Theory and practice in policy analysis. New York: Cambridge Univer­ sity Press. NAE (National Academy of Engineering) and DHS. 2005. News & terrorism: Communicating a crisis (a fact sheet from the National Academies and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security). Washington, DC: National Academy of Sciences. https://www.nae.edu/File. aspx?id=11313&v=6d92116a. NAS (National Academy of Sciences). 2014. The science of science communication II: Sum- mary of a colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. http://doi. org/10.17226/18478. NASEM (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine). 2017a. Building com- munication capacity to counter infectious disease threats: Proceedings of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/24738. NASEM. 2017b. Communicating science effectively: A research agenda. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/23674. NASEM. 2017c. Foundational cybersecurity research: Improving science, engineering, and insti- tutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/24676. NASEM. 2018. Emergency alert and warning systems: Current knowledge and future direc- tions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/24935. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop on August 22–23, 2018, in Washington, DC, to explore medical and public health preparedness for a nuclear incident. The event brought together experts from government, nongovernmental organizations, academia, and the private sector to explore current assumptions behind the status of medical and public health preparedness for a nuclear incident, examine potential changes in these assumptions in light of increasing concerns about the use of nuclear warfare, and discuss challenges and opportunities for capacity building in the current threat environment. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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