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Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States (2019)

Chapter: Appendix D: Chicago Case Study

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Chicago Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
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Appendix D

Chicago Case Study

For the Chicago case study, the committee convened a workshop in Chicago, Illinois, followed by site visits to three Chicago locations. Additional information was collected from some participants via telephone interviews. The workshop was structured to gather information from local, state, regional, and federal stakeholders. Participants were divided into small working groups to address four aspects of urban flooding:

  • Physical aspects of urban flooding (built and natural environment),
  • Social aspects of urban flooding (people and institutions),
  • Data and informational aspects of urban flooding (forecasts, maps, demographics), and
  • Actions and decision-making aspects of urban flooding.

Detailed comments from each working group conversation are available at http://nationalacademies.org/Urban-Flooding-Visits.

WORKSHOP AGENDA

Kimpton Hotel Allegro
Chicago, Illinois
September 19, 2017

8:30 a.m. Welcome and Introductions
David Maidment, Committee Chair, University of Texas at Austin
Lauren Alexander Augustine, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
8:35 Opening remarks
Krys Shaw, Deputy District Director, Office of Congressman Mike Quigley
8:45 Overview talks about the four aspects of urban flooding
Physical Aspects of Urban Flooding in Chicago
John Watson, Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago
Social Aspects of Urban Flooding in Chicago
Hal Sprague, Center for Neighborhood Technology
Harriet Festing, Committee Member
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Chicago Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×
Informational Aspects of Urban Flooding in Chicago
Peter Haas, Center for Neighborhood Technology
Decision Making and Policies in Chicago
Paul Osman, Illinois Office of Water Resources
10:15 Break
10:30 Group breakout sessions
  • Physical aspects of urban flooding (built and natural environment),
  • Social aspects of urban flooding (people and institutions),
  • Data and informational aspects of urban flooding (forecasts, maps, demographics), and
  • Actions and decision-making aspects of urban flooding (actions taken pre-flood, during flood event, and post-flood).
12:00p.m. Working lunch
1:00 Reports from each group
2:00 Workshop adjourns

SITE VISITS

July 5, 2017

1:00p.m.-5:30p.m. Site visits
  • Chatham neighborhood community meeting, 6th Ward Office
  • Wadsworth Elementary Space to Grow program
  • Thornton Quarry and Reservoir
Guide
John Watson, Civil Engineer, Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Chicago Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×

CASE STUDY PARTICIPANTS

The following individuals participated in the workshop, Chicago site visits, and/or in subsequent telephone interviews:

Bulent Agar, Department of Water Management, City of Chicago

Yvette Alexander-Maxie, American Red Cross

Dana Al-Qadi, AECOM

Nora June Beck, Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning

Marcella Bondie Keenan, Center for Neighborhood Technology

David Bucaro, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)

Shannon Burke, American Planning Association

Lori Burns, RainReady Chatham

Anthony Comerio, Hanson Professional Services, Inc.

Kathleen Dickhut, Department of Planning, City of Chicago

Mike Drake, Department of Transportation, City of Chicago

Edward Fenelon, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Joan Frietag, Hanson Professional Services, Inc.

Danielle Gallet, Metropolitan Planning Council

Ludovica Gazze, University of Chicago

Peter Haas, Center for Neighborhood Technology

Beth Hall, Midwestern Regional Climate Center

Jenny Hwang, Humanitarian Disaster Institute

Ora Jackson, RainReady Chatham

Edde Jones, Department of Transportation, City of Chicago

Katherine Jordan, Zurich North America

Karen Kreis, Village of Midlothian

Curtis McKinney, Department of Transportation, City of Chicago

Peter Mulvaney, West Monroe Partners

Paul Osman, Illinois Office of Water Resources

Chris Parker, Floodlothian Midlothian

Joshua Peschel, Iowa State University

Marcus Quigley, OptiRTC

Jennifer Rath, Allstate Insurance Company

Aaron Reisinger, USACE

Roderick Sawyer, Chatham

Brendan Schreiber, Department of Water Management, City of Chicago

James Schwab, American Planning Association

Krys Shaw, Office of Congressman Mike Quigley

Tom Sivak, Office of Emergency Management and Communications

Hal Sprague, Center for Neighborhood Technology

Kari Steele, Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago

Dawn Thompson-Ellis, Center for Neighborhood Technology

Anapam Verma, Department of Water Management, City of Chicago

Zach Vernon, Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning

Cheryl Watson, RainReady Chatham

John Watson, Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Chicago Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Chicago Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Chicago Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×
Page 84
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Chicago Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Chicago Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×
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Flooding is the natural hazard with the greatest economic and social impact in the United States, and these impacts are becoming more severe over time. Catastrophic flooding from recent hurricanes, including Superstorm Sandy in New York (2012) and Hurricane Harvey in Houston (2017), caused billions of dollars in property damage, adversely affected millions of people, and damaged the economic well-being of major metropolitan areas. Flooding takes a heavy toll even in years without a named storm or event. Major freshwater flood events from 2004 to 2014 cost an average of $9 billion in direct damage and 71 lives annually. These figures do not include the cumulative costs of frequent, small floods, which can be similar to those of infrequent extreme floods.

Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States contributes to existing knowledge by examining real-world examples in specific metropolitan areas. This report identifies commonalities and variances among the case study metropolitan areas in terms of causes, adverse impacts, unexpected problems in recovery, or effective mitigation strategies, as well as key themes of urban flooding. It also relates, as appropriate, causes and actions of urban flooding to existing federal resources or policies.

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