National Academies Press: OpenBook

Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B: Baltimore Case Study

« Previous: Appendix A: Trends Affecting Urban Flooding
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Baltimore Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
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Appendix B

Baltimore Case Study

For the Baltimore case study, the committee convened a workshop in Towson, Maryland, followed by site visits to five Baltimore locations. Additional information was collected from some participants via telephone interviews. The workshop was structured to gather information from local stakeholders in Session 1 and federal, state, and regional stakeholders in Session 2. In each session, participants were divided into small working groups to address four aspects of urban flooding:

  • Physical aspects of urban flooding (built and natural environment),
  • Social aspects of urban flooding (people and institutions),
  • Data and informational aspects of urban flooding (forecasts, maps, demographics), and
  • Actions and decision-making aspects of urban flooding.

Detailed comments from each working group conversation are available at http://nationalacademies.org/Urban-Flooding-Visits.

WORKSHOP AGENDA

Towson Marriott Conference Center
Towson, Maryland
April 24, 2017

9:00a.m.-12:00p.m. Session 1. Local Stakeholders
9:00a.m. Welcome and Introductions and Explanation of the Workshop Structure
David Maidment, Committee Chair, University of Texas at Austin
Lauren Alexander Augustine, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Baltimore Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×
9:30 The World Café Workshop
The objective of the workshop is to collect information from local stakeholders and participants in a small group setting. Each group addresses four aspects of urban flooding in 20-minute session rotations:
  • Physical aspects of urban flooding (built and natural environment),
  • Social aspects of urban flooding (people and institutions),
  • Data and informational aspects of urban flooding (forecasts, maps, demographics), and
  • Actions and decision-making aspects of urban flooding (actions taken pre-flood, during flood event, and post-flood).
9:30 Starting Group—What are the impacts?
9:50

Rotation 2—What are the causes?

10:10

Rotation 3—What actions can decision makers take to address the impacts and which resources are available?

10:30

Rotation 4—What are the gaps or needs to reduce urban flooding impacts in the future?

12:00p.m. Working lunch
1:00p.m.-4:00p.m. Session 2. Federal, State, and Regional Stakeholders
1:00p.m. Welcome and Introductions and Explanation of the Workshop Structure
David Maidment and Lauren Alexander Augustine
1:30 The World Café Workshop
The objective of the workshop is to collect information from federal, state, and regional stakeholders and participants in a small group setting. Each group addresses four aspects of urban flooding in 20-minute session rotations
  • Physical aspects of urban flooding (built and natural environment),
  • Social aspects of urban flooding (people and institutions),
  • Data and informational aspects of urban flooding (forecasts, maps, demographics), and
  • Actions and decision-making aspects of urban flooding (actions taken pre-flood, during flood event, and post-flood).
1:30 Starting Group—What are the impacts?
1:50 Rotation 2—What are the causes?
2:10 Rotation 3—What actions can decision makers take to address the impacts and which resources are available?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Baltimore Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×
2:30 Rotation 4—What are the gaps and/or needs to reduce urban flooding impacts in the future?
3:00 Break and discussions
4:00 Workshop adjourns

SITE VISITS

April 25, 2017

9:00a.m.-12:00p.m. Site visits
  • Union Mill
  • Whitehall Mill
  • Mill 1
  • Tunnels and debris catcher
  • Fell’s Point
Guides:
Kimberly Grove, Baltimore City Department of Public Works
Kristin Baja, Baltimore City Department of Planning

CASE STUDY PARTICIPANTS

The following individuals participated in the workshop, site visits, and/or in subsequent telephone interviews:

Azzam Ahmad, Department of Public Works, City of Baltimore

David Alexander, Department of Homeland Security

Elizabeth Asche, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

Jesse Ash, Maryland Department of Planning

Kristin Baja, Office of Sustainability, Baltimore City

Douglas Bellomo, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)

Cathy Brill, Leonard and Helen R. Stulman Foundation

Laura Chap, Atkins Global

Chandra Chithaluru, Maryland Port Administration

Christine Conn, Department of Natural Resources

Laura Connelly, Parks and People Foundation

Jon Dillow, U.S. Geological Survey

Jason Dubow, Maryland Department of Planning

John Dulina, Maryland Emergency Management Agency

Jason Elliott, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Siamak Esfandiary, FEMA

David Flores, Center for Progressive Reform

Susan Gilson, National Association of Flood and Stormwater Management Agencies

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Baltimore Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×

Angela Gladwell, FEMA

Megan Granato, Department of Natural Resources

Kimberly Grove, Department of Public Works, City of Baltimore

Amy Guise, USACE

Elizabeth Habic, Maryland Department of Transportation

Issac Hametz, Mahan Rykiel Associates

Jessica Herpel, Maryland Department of the Environment

Phillip Huber, Lutheran Disaster Response

Kahlil Kettering, The Nature Conservancy

Sasha Land, Department of Natural Resources

Kathryn Lipiecki, FEMA

Katie O’Meara, Maryland Institute College of Art

Luis Rodriguez, FEMA

Rebecca Ruggles, Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers

Sharon Sartor, USACE

Michael Schuster, USACE

Catherine Shanks, Department of Nature Resources

Mathini Sreetharan, Dewberry

Quan Ton, Department of Public Works, Baltimore City

Victor Ukpolo, Office of Sustainability, Baltimore City

Kevin Wagner, Maryland Department of the Environment

Dionne Waldron, Operation HOPE

Michael Willis, Kaiser Permanente Mid-Atlantic

Steven Zubrick, NOAA

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Baltimore Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Baltimore Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×
Page 76
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Baltimore Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×
Page 77
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Baltimore Case Study." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25381.
×
Page 78
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Flooding is the natural hazard with the greatest economic and social impact in the United States, and these impacts are becoming more severe over time. Catastrophic flooding from recent hurricanes, including Superstorm Sandy in New York (2012) and Hurricane Harvey in Houston (2017), caused billions of dollars in property damage, adversely affected millions of people, and damaged the economic well-being of major metropolitan areas. Flooding takes a heavy toll even in years without a named storm or event. Major freshwater flood events from 2004 to 2014 cost an average of $9 billion in direct damage and 71 lives annually. These figures do not include the cumulative costs of frequent, small floods, which can be similar to those of infrequent extreme floods.

Framing the Challenge of Urban Flooding in the United States contributes to existing knowledge by examining real-world examples in specific metropolitan areas. This report identifies commonalities and variances among the case study metropolitan areas in terms of causes, adverse impacts, unexpected problems in recovery, or effective mitigation strategies, as well as key themes of urban flooding. It also relates, as appropriate, causes and actions of urban flooding to existing federal resources or policies.

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