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Suggested Citation:"Summary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Integrating Collaborative Partnering into Traditional Airport Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25386.
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Page 2
Suggested Citation:"Summary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Integrating Collaborative Partnering into Traditional Airport Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25386.
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Page 2
Page 3
Suggested Citation:"Summary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Integrating Collaborative Partnering into Traditional Airport Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25386.
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Page 3
Page 4
Suggested Citation:"Summary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Integrating Collaborative Partnering into Traditional Airport Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25386.
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Page 5
Suggested Citation:"Summary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Integrating Collaborative Partnering into Traditional Airport Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25386.
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Page 5

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1 What Is Collaborative Partnering? Collaborative partnering is a structured process to instill cooperative cultures on construction projects among: • Project Team Members: This group includes owners, architects, engineers, construction managers, and contractors, and • Project Stakeholders: This group includes operations, maintenance, properties, environ- mental systems, security, inspections, concessionaires, airlines, the TSA, the FAA, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), and so forth. It is suitable for any project delivery method, and scalable to any project type and risk involved and any size and type of airport. The payback generally increases with scale and complexity. What Are the Benefits of Collaborative Partnering? The benefits of collaborative partnering can be categorized in two areas: • Project Performance Outcomes: These benefits consist of improvement in all key project performance outcomes (safety, quality, schedule, cost and so forth). On average, the highest perceived positive impact is on conflict resolution and reduced disputes. • Team and Individual Performance Outcomes: These benefits consist of highly improved team integration and commitment to project goals. How Much Does Collaborative Partnering Cost? Partnering costs vary, but at the highest partnering intensity level, partnering costs generally are less than 0.2% of the project budget. How Will This Guidebook Help? With the help of this guidebook, owners and project teams should be able to: • Educate the individuals responsible for decision making for airport budgets and operations (i.e., executives, high-level stakeholders, elected officials, and so forth) about the benefits of collaborative partnering using case-based evidence. • Pilot collaborative partnering on smaller projects first. • Prioritize using highly qualified third-party partnering facilitators on the pilot projects. S U M M A R Y Guidebook for Integrating Collaborative Partnering into Traditional Airport Practices

2 Guidebook for Integrating Collaborative Partnering into Traditional Airport Practices Chapters in this guidebook are designed as follows: • Chapter 1 focuses on understanding collaborative partnering, its benefits and its costs. • Chapter 2 introduces a set of collaborative partnering tools. • Chapter 3 addresses how to select and begin using partnering tools at the right time for the project. • Chapter 4 focuses on how to manage key tools effectively, including the roles of partnering facilitator and the importance of stakeholder engagement. • Chapter 5 addresses how to assess and improve organizational readiness for collaborative partnering. • Chapter 6 presents the conclusions of this study, emphasizing key concepts. • The three appendices provide samples of collaborative partnering tools, examples of partner- ing costs, and resources to learn more. How Do I Implement Collaborative Partnering for the First Time? This guide is particularly important for airport staff who are new to collaborative partner- ing. Lack of understanding about collaborative partnering is one of the highest rated barriers for its adoption. Chapters 1–4 of this guidebook are intended to assist owners and airport staff in over- coming this barrier and paving a way for improved implementation of collaborative partnering in airport construction projects, especially for first-time users. Which Collaborative Partnering Tools Should I Implement? How and When? Chapter 2 of the guidebook provides an overview of collaborative partnering tools. Descriptions of the tools are supplemented with examples from airport construction project case studies. Consulting the samples will help readers with understanding how to use the tools. Chapter 3 explains required and recommended collaborative partnering tools for project success based on project risk and partnering intensity. The project risk assessment tools discussed in Chapter 3 involve using partnering intensity levels for projects. The partnering implementation framework presented in Chapter 3 is intended to further assist project teams in determining the right timing with which to use these tools in project delivery. Checklists included in the appendices also will assist project teams in tracking implementation of collaborative partnering tools during project delivery. How Do I Sustain the Benefits of Partnering Over Time? As the project-specific benefits of collaborative partnering become clear, airport organi- zations can begin to implement the following practices to optimize performance outcomes across projects: • Incorporate collaborative partnering requirements in project manuals, specifications, and pre-bid meeting documents. • Improve readiness for collaborative partnering with champions in top management by cultivating resources and connections with experienced partnering experts and organizations.

Summary 3 • Look to state agencies, including state departments of transportation (DOTs), for established partnering programs and take advantage of that pre-existing knowledge and experience to immediately improve organizational readiness for partnering. • When possible, follow the principles of “best-value procurement” in projects. • Via development and effective communication of values and institutional goals, encourage openness in corporate policies to promote or incorporate collaborative partnering. Chapter 5 of this guidebook is intended to support airport organizations preparing to implement collaborative partnering for the first time. Collaborative Partnering at a Glance The figure and table that close this summary provide an at-a-glance, chronological overview of collaborative partnering tools and the partnering process. The table also pre- sents an overview of partnering intensity levels, potential risk factors, associated tools, and associated costs.

C L O S E – O U T A close-out workshop (Tool 16) is held to denote the end of collaborative partnering and project delivery. N OI T C U R T S N O C • Partnering Charter (Tool 4) • Issue resolution process (Tool 5) • Co-location (Tool 6) • Partnering training (Tool 7) • Partnering scorecards (Tool 8) • Stakeholder engagement (Tool 9) • Multi-tiered partnering (Tool 11) • Focus groups (Tool 12) • Partnering meeting minutes (Tool 13) • Team-building activities (Tool 14) Subsequent partnering workshops (Tool 10) are held during project delivery. Partnering tools 4–9 and 11–14 (at left) also can be used during these workshops. Prior to project start, the partnering facilitator (Tool 2) leads the kick-off partnering meeting (Tool 3), at which the Partnering Charter (Tool 4) is developed. Partnering tools 5, 7, 8, 9, and 13 (at right) also can be used at this stage. • Issue resolution process (Tool 5) •Partnering training (Tool 7) •Partnering scorecards (Tool 8) •Stakeholder engagement (Tool 9) •Partnering meeting minutes (Tool 13) G NI N N A L P Partnering specifications (Tool 1) can guide partnering implementation on the project. D E S IG N If things go wrong in a project, turnaround partnering, led by a neutral partnering facilitator, can be set in motion to diagnose the problems and initiate the needed corrective actions to get the project back on track. • Partnering recognition and awards (Tool 15) This figure provides a glimpse into the collaborative partnering tools and process, which are discussed in detail in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3. Generic chronological overview of collaborative partnering tools’ implementation during project delivery.

Partnering intensity levels and approximate associated costs. Partnering Intensity Level Potential Risk Factors Required Partnering Tools Cost of Partnering per Year Level 5 High Risk  High risks to project cost and time.  Construction highly interferes with key airport operations such as security checkpoints.  Project cost more than $100 million.  Project duration is more than 2 years or is subject to a highly aggressive schedule. Partnering facilitation must be external third-party facilitation. A kick-off partnering meeting must be held, during which the Partnering Charter and a formal issue resolution process are developed with stakeholders. Monthly partnering workshops include stakeholders (and include adoption of meeting minutes and partnering scorecards). Multi-tiered partnering with stakeholders involves executive, field, and core levels. Focus groups and a close-out workshop are required. $60,000– $97,000 Level 4 Medium-High Risk  Moderate risks to project cost and time.  Construction moderately interferes with key airport operations such as security checkpoints.  Project cost between $50 million and $100 million.  Project duration is more than 2 years or subject to a moderately aggressive schedule. Partnering facilitation must be external third-party facilitation. A kick-off partnering meeting must be held, during which the Partnering Charter and a formal issue resolution process are developed with stakeholders. Monthly partnering workshops include stakeholders (and include adoption of meeting minutes and partnering scorecards). Multi-tiered partnering with stakeholders involves executive and field levels. Focus groups and a close-out workshop are required. $50,000– $76,000 Level 3 Medium Risk  Moderate risks to project cost and time.  Construction interferes moderately with key airport operations but not with security checkpoints.  Project cost between $25 million and $50 million.  Project duration is between 1 year and 2 years or is subject to a moderately aggressive schedule. Partnering facilitation must be external third-party facilitation. A kick-off partnering meeting must be held during which the Partnering Charter and a formal issue resolution process are developed with stakeholders. Bi-monthly partnering workshops include stakeholders (and include use of meeting minutes and partnering scorecards). Multi-tiered partnering with stakeholders involves executive levels. $30,000– $49,000 Level 2 Medium-Low Risk  Moderate to low risks to project cost and time.  Construction interferes moderately with key airport operations but not with security checkpoints.  Project cost between $10 million and $25 million.  Project duration is 1 year or is moderately risky. Partnering facilitation using an internal or external third-party facilitator (at least at the kick-off partnering meeting). A Partnering Charter and issue resolution process are developed with stakeholders. Quarterly partnering workshops include stakeholders and meeting minutes. Two partnering scorecards are completed (one at the first workshop and one during construction). $19,000– $31,000 Level 1 Low Risk  Low risks to project cost and time.  No interference with key airport operations.  Project cost less than $10 million.  Project duration is 1 year or is at low risk. Partnering facilitation may be internal or self-directed. At least two workshops (at project start and during construction). Issue resolution process (develop with stakeholders). $10,000– $16,000 Notes: (1) The partnering tools used at each level are shown in bold italics, with differing levels highlighted using underlined italics. (2) Regardless of the risk level, most aviation construction projects involve high political significance, project complexity, team coordination, and stakeholder engagement. (3) The costs were calculated assuming the costs for partnering workshops at $4,500–$7,500 per workshop and partnering scorecards at $500–$600 per scorecard. Costs of training, accommodation and refreshments, if applicable, are additional.

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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 196: Guidebook for Integrating Collaborative Partnering into Traditional Airport Practices provides guidance for using collaborative partnering for airport construction projects. Collaborative partnering is a structured process to bring owners, designers, and construction teams face-to-face throughout the life of the project, and often is facilitated by a neutral third party. This report explores how airport staff involved with the design, construction, operation, and maintenance phases of constructing new airport assets may use collaborative partnering to potentially enhance tasks during the process.

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