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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6 - Conclusions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Integrating Collaborative Partnering into Traditional Airport Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25386.
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Page 58
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6 - Conclusions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Integrating Collaborative Partnering into Traditional Airport Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25386.
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Page 59

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58 6.1 Collaborative Partnering for Airport Construction Projects Collaborative partnering offers a great opportunity to successfully address the added com- plexity inherent in airport construction projects. These complexities translate into potential risks in projects such as change orders, cost growth, and poor schedule performance. On non- partnered projects, it is more likely for project team conflicts in these risk areas to lead to claims, disputes, and even litigation, thereby significantly affecting project and team performance and damaging relationships and reputations. 6.2 A Note to Top Management: Why Support Collaborative Partnering? Collaborative partnering improves project performance outcomes via enhanced individual and team performance. The main benefits of a partnering approach, regardless of project delivery method, budget size, and organizational readiness, include: • Reduced cost growth, including significant reductions in the cost of change orders and costs associated with claims. • Project delivery ahead of schedule and reduced liquidated damages. • Improved productivity, team integration, and commitment to project goals. • Reduced disputes, claims, and enhanced conflict resolution. Airport executives may not be able to change legislated requirements for low-bid procurement in construction projects, but they can change the culture in project teams to promote collaborative delivery via use of partnering. Owner-driven partnering has the greatest success. Collaborative partnering is: • Suitable for any project delivery method, including DB, DBB, and CMR/CMGC. • Scalable to most project types and levels of risk, whether the project is airside, landside, or a terminal project. • Suitable for any size and type of airport, although payback generally increases with scale and complexity. C H A P T E R 6 Conclusions

Conclusions 59 6.3 Successful Implementation of Collaborative Partnering Keys to successful project outcomes are: • Piloting partnering on smaller projects first. • Setting priorities using highly qualified third-party partnering facilitators on pilot projects irrespective of project risk or size. • Selecting the right partnering facilitator for the project team’s culture and the level of project risk (see Table 3 in Chapter 3). • Listing partnering parameters in the bid documents (project specifications), if possible. This practice is appropriate when using any delivery method, but is especially important with a DBB project. • Using the tools presented in this guidebook to fit the project to the appropriate partnering intensity level, considering project risks (see Table 2 and Table 3 in Chapter 3). • Adopt partnering early in project delivery and use the right tools at the right time. Refer to the partnering implementation framework in this guidebook to learn more. 6.4 Thinking Beyond the Project to the Organization After completion of a project, the organization can continue to develop collaborative partnering by: • Recording lessons learned and key performance outcomes to improve partnering use. • Improving the level of organizational readiness for partnering via tools and resources provided in this guidebook (see Table 8 in Chapter 5). • Partner with immediately available experts (e.g., state DOT representatives who might have experience in partnering) or join mentoring programs (e.g., the IPI professional network) to expedite learning and organizational readiness to implement partnering in the most effective way possible. 6.5 Final Words Despite the numerous reported benefits, collaborative partnering alone will not make a project successful. Proper planning and design practices and fitting contractual and procurement arrangements for projects are some of the keys elements to success. Teams lacking those elements are likely to fail in pursuit of their goals. Nevertheless, for projects that are appropriately led and have been set up for success, collaborative partnering can greatly help teams meet and surpass their project goals.

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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 196: Guidebook for Integrating Collaborative Partnering into Traditional Airport Practices provides guidance for using collaborative partnering for airport construction projects. Collaborative partnering is a structured process to bring owners, designers, and construction teams face-to-face throughout the life of the project, and often is facilitated by a neutral third party. This report explores how airport staff involved with the design, construction, operation, and maintenance phases of constructing new airport assets may use collaborative partnering to potentially enhance tasks during the process.

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