National Academies Press: OpenBook

Monitoring Educational Equity (2019)

Chapter: Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
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Appendix D

Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee

Committee on Identifying Indicators of Education Equity
Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT)
Commission Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE)

Meeting 1: April 20-21, 2017
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Keck Center
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC

Agenda

9:30 am-3:15 pm OPEN SESSION
9:30 am Welcome, Introductions
Mary Ellen O’Connell, Executive Director, DBASSE
Constance Citro, Director, CNSTAT
9:45 Sponsors’ Goals and Priorities
Discussion Leader: Laura Hamilton
Each sponsor should talk about the goals they have for the project: What expectations do they have for the project? What impacts would they like to see? How can we start build-
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
×
ing momentum and political will for the adoption of equity indicators?
  • Vivian Tseng, William T. Grant Foundation
  • Kim Robinson, W.K. Kellogg Foundation
  • Chris Chapman, Institute of Education Sciences (IES), U.S. Department of Education
  • Spencer Foundation
  • Atlantic Philanthropies
  • Ford Foundation
10:30 Take-away messages from the October 5, 2015, planning meeting
Discussion Leader: Michael MacKenzie
  • Richard Murnane, Harvard (by telephone)
  • Natalie Nielsen, Staff, Board on Testing and Assessment, DBASSE
11:00 Break
11:15 am-3:00 pm Moderated Conversations with Researchers and Stakeholders
11:15 Panel 1: Considerations when Adopting Indicators
Discussion Leader: Jim Kemple
Panelists will discuss the processes and criteria that are used to ensure that indicators represent valid, reliable, and useful measures of the status of the education system. Panelists will draw from two concrete examples that are illustrative of ones that have moved from research use to policy use—graduation rates and achievement test results.
  • Elaine Allensworth, Consortium of Chicago School Research (committee member): High School Graduation Rates
  • Sean Reardon, Stanford (committee member): State Achievement Test Results
11:45 Panel 2: Government Affiliated Data Collections
Discussion Leader: Sharon Lewis
Panelists from two levels of government—federal and district—will discuss uses of civil rights/equity data collected by gov-
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
×
ernment agencies. Ms. Lhamon will discuss the ways the US Commission on Civil Rights uses the data. Mr. Carvalho will talk about the data his district is required to collect for different levels of government and the extent to which it is useful for informing policy and practice at the local level
  • Catherine Lhamon, Chair, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights
  • Alberto Carvalho, Superintendent, Miami-Dade County Schools; Committee Member
12:25-1:15 pm Lunch
1:15 Panel 3: Use of Indicators for Policy Purposes (50 min.)
Discussion Leaders: Meredith Phillips, Karolyn Tyson
This panel includes individuals from several organizations that advocate for improvements in education for all students. Panelists will address the following questions: (1) Of the equity indicators that the committee might focus on, what types would be most useful to the aims/mission of your organization? (2) How would you use them in your work?
  • Natasha Ushomirsky, Education Trust
  • Nat Mulkas, American Enterprise Institute
  • Amber Northern, Fordham Institute
  • Stephanie Wood-Garnett, Alliance for Excellence in Education
2:05 Panel 4: Disseminating and Interpreting Indicators (50 min.)
Discussion Leaders: Stella Flores, Morgan Polikoff
[10 mins per panelist, 10 min for discussion]
The panel includes individuals from organizations that disseminate and interpret information related to education equity. Panelists will share samples of reports published by their organization and address the following questions: (1) What equity indicators do you currently report? (2) What feedback do they receive from users of your reports?
  • David Murphey, Child Trends
  • Betsy Brand, American Youth Policy Forum
  • Ilene Berman, Annie E Casey Foundation
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
×
  • Jennifer Park, Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics: National Indicators of Well Being, U.S. Office of Management and Budget
3:00 Summing Up
Christopher Edley
3:15 Adjourn

Committee on Identifying Indicators of Education Equity
Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT)

Meeting 2: October 2-3, 2017
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Keck Center
Room 201
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC

Agenda

9:30 am-2:15 pm OPEN SESSION
MODERATED PANEL DISCUSSIONS
9:30 am Tab B Welcome, Introductions, Review of the agenda
Christopher Edley, Chair
Panel Discussions
Panel discussions will focus on research related to the following valued education outcomes:
  1. Kindergarten readiness
  2. Strong academic growth and achievement in English language arts and math in grades K–12
  3. Engagement in schooling (i.e., attendance, course enrollment)
  4. On-time high school graduation
  5. Graduating college-ready (in terms of coursework and GPA, not just ACT/SAT scores)
  6. Postsecondary enrollment in higher education and training
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
×
Each panelist has been assigned to one or two of the six outcomes and has agreed to prepare a paper that reviews the literature on equity issues related to the outcome.
In the paper, panelists will also examine literature on the predictors/correlates of those outcomes and on equity issues related to these predictors and correlates.
Panelists will consider predictors and correlates from 4 broad categories: (a) family and home environment; (b) child and adolescent social-emotional and academic development; (c) in-school structures, supports, and resources; and (d) community and neighborhood environment.
The panel discussions are designed to lay the groundwork for the papers, and the information will be used to refine the goals for each paper.
There will be 3 parts to the panel discussions. Part 1 will focus on each outcome separately. Parts 2 and 3 will be cross-outcome discussions.
Panelists
Pre-K Readiness
Katherine Magnuson, University of Wisconsin (by telephone)
K–12: Strong Achievement and Academic Progress and Engagement in Schooling
These two outcomes were combined for the purpose of the literature reviews because they draw from similar research bases. The categories of predictors have been split across 3 panelists as detailed below.
Douglas Ready, Columbia Teachers College
Will address predictors related to in-school supports, such as school curricula, resources, teachers, support systems
Lori Taylor Texas A&M
Will address predictors related to school finance, economics of education
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
×
On-Time High School Graduation
Russell Rumberger and Jay Plasman, University of California, Santa Barbara
Transition to Postsecondary Education & Training
Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Insight Policy Research
9:45-11:00 Part 1: Describe Outcomes and Predictors
Discussion Leaders: Laura Hamilton, Sara McLanahan
Each panelist will give a brief, 10-minute overview for the assigned outcome and address the questions listed below. This may could include a few power point slides, handouts, and/or citations for important studies.
  1. Describe Outcomes: How is each outcome defined and measured? What are the components/subcomponents of each outcome?
  2. Describe Predictors/Correlates/Opportunities: What are the most powerful predictors/correlates of performance on the outcome? How are the predictors/correlates defined and measured?
11:00 am-12:00 pm Part 2: Cross-Outcomes Discussion of Equity
Discussion Leaders: Sean Reardon, Sharon Lewis
Two committee members will lead panelists in a discussion of similarities and differences in predictors/correlates across outcomes. The focus will be on the factors that affect disadvantaged students in ways that result in disparities in outcomes.
  1. How do predictors/correlates relate to equity? Which predictors/correlates are most associated with disparities (e.g., by race, SES, immigration status, EL status, other) on each outcome measure?
12:00-12:45 Lunch in Meeting Room
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
×
12:45-2:15 Part 3: Cross-Outcomes Discussion of Indicators and Policy Interventions (90 mins.)
Moderators: Karolyn Tyson, Morgan Polikoff
Two committee members will lead panelists in a cross-outcomes discussion of research on leverage points for policy interventions and on potential indicators that could facilitate such interventions.
  1. Which predictors/correlates are sensitive to policy intervention? Which predictors/correlates are the most “malleable,” and likely to change as a result of targeted policy interventions intended -to increase equity in the outcomes?
  2. Which factors are candidates for indicators? What components of the outcomes and predictors/correlates “rise to the top” as potential indicators? What do you see as challenges or limitations associated with those potential indicators?
2:15 Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Agendas for Public Sessions of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Monitoring Educational Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25389.
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Next: Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff »
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Disparities in educational attainment among population groups have characterized the United States throughout its history. Education is sometimes characterized as the “great equalizer,” but to date, the country has not found ways to successfully address the adverse effects of socioeconomic circumstances, prejudice, and discrimination that suppress performance for some groups.

To ensure that the pursuit of equity encompasses both the goals to which the nation aspires for its children and the mechanisms to attain those goals, a revised set of equity indicators is needed. Measures of educational equity often fail to account for the impact of the circumstances in which students live on their academic engagement, academic progress, and educational attainment. Some of the contextual factors that bear on learning include food and housing insecurity, exposure to violence, unsafe neighborhoods, adverse childhood experiences, and exposure to environmental toxins. Consequently, it is difficult to identify when intervention is necessary and how it should function. A revised set of equity indicators should highlight disparities, provide a way to explore potential causes, and point toward possible improvements.

Monitoring Educational Equity proposes a system of indicators of educational equity and presents recommendations for implementation. This report also serves as a framework to help policy makers better understand and combat inequity in the United States’ education system. Disparities in educational opportunities reinforce, and often amplify, disparities in outcomes throughout people’s lives. Thus, it is critical to ensure that all students receive comprehensive supports that level the playing field in order to improve the well-being of underrepresented individuals and the nation.

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