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Beyond Spectre: Confronting New Technical and Policy Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Beyond Spectre: Confronting New Technical and Policy Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25418.
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B Planning Committee Biographies

FRED B. SCHNEIDER, Chair, is Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University. Dr. Schneider joined Cornell’s faculty in fall 1978, having completed a Ph.D. at Stony Brook University and a B.S. in engineering at Cornell in 1975. Dr. Schneider’s research has always concerned various aspects of trustworthy systems—systems that will perform as expected, despite failures and attacks. Most recently, his interests have focused on system security. His work characterizing what policies can be enforced with various classes of defenses is widely cited, and it is seen as advancing the nascent science base for security. He is also engaged in research concerning legal and economic measures for improving system trustworthiness. Dr. Schneider was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS; 1992), the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM; 1995), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE; 2008). He was named professor-at-large at the University of Tromso (Norway) in 1996 and was awarded a doctor of science honoris causa by the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 2003 for his work in computer dependability and security. He received the 2012 IEEE Emanuel R. Piore Award for “contributions to trustworthy computing through novel approaches to security, fault-tolerance and formal methods for concurrent and distributed systems.” The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) elected Dr. Schneider to membership in 2011, the Norges Tekniske Vitenskapsakademi (Norwegian Academy of Technological Sciences) named him a foreign member in 2010, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences elected him in 2017. He is currently a member of the Naval Studies Board and the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and the founding chair of the Forum on Cyber Resilience.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Beyond Spectre: Confronting New Technical and Policy Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25418.
×

ANITA L. ALLEN is the Henry R. Silverman Professor of Law and Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where she is also the university’s vice provost for faculty. Professor Allen is an expert on privacy law, bioethics, and contemporary values, and is recognized for her scholarship about legal philosophy, women’s rights, and race relations. In 2010, she was appointed by President Barack Obama to the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. Her books include Unpopular Privacy: What Must We Hide (2011); Privacy Law and Society (2011); The New Ethics: A Guided Tour of the 21st Century Moral Landscape (2004); Why Privacy Isn’t Everything: Feminist Reflections on Personal Accountability (2003); and Uneasy Access: Privacy for Women in a Free Society (1988). She co-edited (with Milton Regan) Debating Democracy’s Discontent (1998). Professor Allen, who has written more than 100 scholarly articles, has also contributed to popular magazines and blogs and has frequently appeared on nationally broadcast television and radio programs. She has served on numerous editorial and advisory boards and on the boards of a number of local and national nonprofits and professional associations including the Hastings Center, the Electronic Information Privacy Center, and the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law.

ERIC GROSSE builds open systems and advises companies on security. He retired from Google as vice president, security and privacy engineering, where his team achieved improved and wider use of SSL, stronger consumer authentication technology, detection and blocking of espionage, transparency on legal requests for data, and sophisticated malware analysis and built tools and frameworks for safer web applications. Before Google, Dr. Grosse was a research director and fellow at Lucent Bell Labs where he worked on security, networking, algorithms for approximation and visualization, software distribution, and scientific computing. He has a Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Beyond Spectre: Confronting New Technical and Policy Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25418.
×

BUTLER W. LAMPSON is a technical fellow at Microsoft Corporation and an adjunct professor at MIT. He has worked on computer architecture, local area networks, raster printers, page description languages, operating systems, remote procedure calls, programming languages and their semantics, programming in the large, fault-tolerant computing, transaction processing, computer security, WYSIWYG editors, and tablet computers. Dr. Lampson was one of the designers of the SDS 940 time-sharing system, the Alto personal distributed computing system, the Xerox 9700 laser printer, two-phase commit protocols, the Autonet LAN, the SPKI system for network security, the Microsoft Tablet PC software, the Microsoft Palladium high-assurance stack, and several programming languages. He received the ACM Software Systems Award in 1984 for his work on the Alto, the IEEE Computer Pioneer Award in 1996 and the von Neumann Medal in 2001, the Turing Award in 1992, and the NAE’s Draper Prize in 2004. Dr. Lampson is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering and is a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

SUSAN LANDAU is the Bridge Professor of Cyber Security and Policy in the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and the School of Engineering, Department of Computer Science, Tufts University. Dr. Landau works at the intersection of cybersecurity, national security, law, and policy. She is author of Listening In: Cybersecurity in an Insecure Age (2017), Surveillance or Security? The Risks Posed by New Wiretapping Technologies (2011), and Privacy on the Line: The Politics of Wiretapping and Encryption, coauthored with Whitfield Diffie (1998). Dr. Landau’s early work was on fast algorithms for algebraic problems; for the past 20 years she has focused on issues in cybersecurity, national security, and privacy, with particular emphasis on cryptography policy, surveillance, and communications metadata. She has testified before Congress and frequently briefed U.S. and European policy makers on encryption, surveillance, and cybersecurity issues. Dr. Landau has been a senior staff privacy analyst at Google, a distinguished engineer at Sun Microsystems, and a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Beyond Spectre: Confronting New Technical and Policy Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25418.
×

faculty member at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and Wesleyan University. She has served on the National Academies Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (2010-2016) and the National Science Foundation Computer and Information Advisory Board (2010-2013). A 2015 inductee in the Cybersecurity Hall of Fame and a 2012 Guggenheim fellow, Dr. Landau was a 2010-2011 fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the recipient of the 2008 Women of Vision Social Impact Award. She is also a fellow of AAAS and ACM.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Beyond Spectre: Confronting New Technical and Policy Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25418.
×
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Beyond Spectre: Confronting New Technical and Policy Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25418.
×
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Beyond Spectre: Confronting New Technical and Policy Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25418.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Beyond Spectre: Confronting New Technical and Policy Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25418.
×
Page 66
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In 2017, researchers discovered a vulnerability in microprocessors used in computers and devices all over the world. The vulnerability, named Spectre, combines side effects from caching and speculative execution, which are techniques that have been used for many years to increase the speed at which computers operate. The discovery upends a number of common assumptions about cybersecurity and draws attention to the complexities of the global supply chain and global customer base for the vast range of devices and cloud capabilities that all computer users rely on. In October 2018, the Forum on Cyber Resilience hosted a workshop to explore the implications of this development. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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