National Academies Press: OpenBook

A Research Agenda for Transforming Separation Science (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B: Meeting and Webinar Agendas

« Previous: Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting and Webinar Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Research Agenda for Transforming Separation Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25421.
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Page 104
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting and Webinar Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Research Agenda for Transforming Separation Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25421.
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Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting and Webinar Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Research Agenda for Transforming Separation Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25421.
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Page 106
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting and Webinar Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Research Agenda for Transforming Separation Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25421.
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Page 107

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Appendix B Meeting and Webinar Agendas MEETING 1: February 20, 2018 14:00 Welcome and Plan for the Afternoon Joan Brennecke (Chair), University of Texas at Austin 14:05 Sponsor Briefing Bruce Garrett, Raul Miranda, and Philip Wilk, U.S. Department of Energy Vincent Shen, National Institute of Standards and Technology 14:30 Discussion 15:15 Panel Discussion from Key Stakeholders Robert Giraud, Chemours David Constable, American Chemical Society 15:45 Discussion WEBINAR 1: April 2, 2018 12:00 Welcome and Opening Remarks Joan Brennecke (Chair), University of Texas at Austin 12:05 William Koros, Georgia Institute of Technology Roberto C. Goizueta, Chair for Excellence in Chemical Engineering and Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Membranes 12:20 Benny Freeman, University of Texas at Austin Richard B. Curran Centennial Chair in Engineering 12:35 Michael Tsapatsis, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis Professor, McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair and Amundson Chair, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science 12:50 Discussion 13:30 Wrap-Up and Adjourn Joan Brennecke (Chair), University of Texas at Austin 104 Prepublication Copy

Appendix B MEETING 2: May 7–8, 2018 Day 1 13:05 Welcome and Introductions Joan Brennecke (Chair), University of Texas at Austin SESSION I — SYNTHESIS 13:15 Jeffrey Long, University of California, Berkeley 13:35 Kelly Zhang, Genentech 13:55 Discussion SESSION II — ELECTRIC FIELDS 14:30 T. Alan Hatton, Massachusetts Institutes of Technology 14:50 Discussion SESSION III — THERMAL FIELDS 15:10 Kim Williams, Colorado School of Mines 15:30 Greg Swift, Los Alamos National Laboratory 15:50 Discussion SESSION IV — LIGHT FIELDS 16:30 Matthew Hill, Monash University 16:55 Discussion SESSION V — CRYSTALLIZATION 17:15 Zoltan Nagy, Purdue University 17:35 Discussion Day 2 09:35 Welcome and Introduction Joan Brennecke (Chair), University of Texas at Austin SESSION IV — LIGHT FIELDS (continuation from Day 1) 09:40 Philip Jessop, Queens University 10:00 Amar Flood, Indiana University Prepublication Copy 105

A Research Agenda: A Vision for the Future of Separation Science 10:20 Discussion SESSION V — CRYSTALLIZATION (continuation from Day 1) 10:35 Radu Custelcean, Oak Ridge National Laboratory 10:55 Discussion SESSION VI — MAGNETIC FIELDS 11:10 Jeff Chalmers, Ohio State University 11:30 Discussion MEETING 3: August 22–23, 2018 Day 1 12:45 Welcome and Introductions Joan Brennecke (Chair), University of Texas at Austin SESSION I PANEL: Molecular Modeling and Electronic Structure Methods 12:50 J. Ilja Siepmann, University of Minnesota Susan Sinnott, Pennsylvania State University SESSION II PANEL: INSTRUMENTATION FOR CHARACTERIZATION 14:15 Jeff Reimer, University of California, Berkeley Marek Pruski, Iowa State University Craig Brown, National Institute of Standards and Technology Heather C. Allen, Ohio State University 15:45 G. Brian Stephenson, Argonne National Laboratory 16:05 Mark R. Antonio, Argonne National Laboratory Day 2 09:00 Welcome and Opening Remarks Joan Brennecke (Chair), University of Texas at Austin SESSION III PANEL: Statistical Methods and Fluid Dynamics 09:05 Jeff Morris, City College of New York Jaehun Chun, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Greg Voth, University of Chicago 106 Prepublication Copy

Appendix B SESSION IV PANEL: MACHINE LEARNING AND DATA SCIENCE OPPORTUNITIES FOR SEPARATIONS 10:15 Roger Rousseau, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Heather J. Kulik, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Marilu Dick-Perez, Iowa State University Andrew Peterson, Brown University 10:45 Discussion SESSION V: MARRYING SINGLE MOLECULE SPECTROSCOPY TO A PREDICTIVE THEORY 11:30 Christy Landes, Rice University 12:00 Open Session Adjourn WEBINAR II: September 24, 2018 3:00 Welcome and Opening Remarks Joan Brennecke (Chair), University of Texas at Austin 3:05 Christina M. Payne, National Science Foundation Jim Bielenberg, Rapid Advancement in Process Intensification Deployment (RAPID) Manufacturing Institute 3:20 Discussion Prepublication Copy 107

Next: Appendix C: Examples of Characterization »
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Separation science plays a critical role in maintaining our standard of living and quality of life. Many industrial processes and general necessities such as chemicals, medicines, clean water, safe food, and energy sources rely on chemical separations. However, the process of chemical separations is often overlooked during product development and this has led to inefficiency, unnecessary waste, and lack of consensus among chemists and engineers. A reevaluation of system design, establishment of standards, and an increased focus on the advancement of separation science are imperative in supporting increased efficiency, continued U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, and public welfare.

A Research Agenda for Transforming Separation Science explores developments in the industry since the 1987 National Academies report, Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities. Many needs stated in the original report remain today, in addition to a variety of new challenges due to improved detection limits, advances in medicine, and a recent emphasis on sustainability and environmental stewardship. This report examines emerging chemical separation technologies, relevant developments in intersecting disciplines, and gaps in existing research, and provides recommendations for the application of improved separation science technologies and processes. This research serves as a foundation for transforming separation science, which could reduce global energy use, improve human and environmental health, and advance more efficient practices in various industries.

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