National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 1 Introduction
Page 15
Suggested Citation:"2 Methodology." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Partnerships Between Transit Agencies and Transportation Network Companies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25425.
×
Page 15
Page 16
Suggested Citation:"2 Methodology." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Partnerships Between Transit Agencies and Transportation Network Companies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25425.
×
Page 16
Page 17
Suggested Citation:"2 Methodology." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Partnerships Between Transit Agencies and Transportation Network Companies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25425.
×
Page 17

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

2-1 2 Methodology The research includes a thorough investigation of active and inactive partnerships between transit agencies and TNCs. Findings from this research will enhance the transit industry’s understanding of what has been tried to date and inform a “Partnership Playbook” to guide industry decision-makers. This report is not intended to provide insights or guidance around transit agency partnerships with other emerging mobility service providers, such as microtransit or autonomous shuttle vendors. Due to the fact that the mobility landscape is changing at an unprecedented rate, this work intends to capture findings from transit agency-TNC partnerships to date. STUDY SCOPE As evidenced by the FTA’s Online Dialogue regarding shared mobility,10 there is a persistent and growing set of concerns within the public transportation industry regarding best practices for establishing formal and informal partnerships with TNCs. This study researches these partnerships to reveal where there is lack of clarity and to provide possible solutions. For the purposes of this research, TNC refers to companies that connect people seeking trips with drivers who are often, but not always, using their personal, non-commercial vehicle; these connections are made through web- or smartphone-based apps. Although there are a number of TNC vendors in the U.S. marketplace, most partnerships involve Uber and Lyft. Lastly, it is important to note that TNCs have also established partnerships with other public and private agencies such as municipal departments of transportation, senior centers, non-profits, developers, campuses, employers, and healthcare providers. While we acknowledge these partnerships, this research focuses on TNCs’ partnerships with transit agencies. OUR APPROACH Transit Agency Survey In January 2018, the research team issued a survey to transit agencies that had either partnered or explored partnerships. The objective was to solicit feedback and collect quantitative and qualitative information regarding a range of topics including basic partnership information, operational characteristics, regulatory considerations, contracting and data sharing, third-party providers, and program evaluation. The transit agency survey was developed online via SurveyMonkey and also available in PDF format. Appendix A contains the survey instrument. Prior to distribution, the research team compiled a comprehensive list of all known partnerships and appropriate transit agency contacts. Policy staff from Uber and Lyft helped ensure that the list was comprehensive. Forty-four transit agencies in 20 states received the survey to complete the survey and given the option to complete the survey online or over the phone. Follow-up 10 https://usdot.uservoice.com/forums/569902-shared-mobility-online-dialogue-forum-is-now-clos/filters/top

2-2 emails and calls were provided to transit agencies that did not respond promptly. The survey yielded a response rate of 84% –38 responses were received from 37 transit agencies as one transit agency submitted separate surveys for two different partnerships. Survey results are summarized later in this report. Transit Agency Interviews Following the transit agency survey, the research team scheduled follow-up interviews with select transit agencies that would serve as potential case studies. Interviewees were selected based on the partnership design, complexity, and applicability to other transit agencies interested in similar partnerships. The objective was to develop an understanding of the motivations, preparation, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of TNC partnerships to guide other interested transit agencies in decision making. Questions were tailored to survey responses and included discussions of:  Partnership relationship initiation goals and anticipated outcome  Establishment of informal (no exchange of funds) or formal (exchange of funds) partnership)  Regulatory consideration (Title VI and ADA)  Operational characteristics  Program evaluation  Lessons learned Of the 36 transit agencies completing surveys, 20 responded to requests for follow-up interviews, which are included as in-depth case studies in Chapter 4:  Big Blue Bus (BBB) (Santa Monica, CA)  Capital Metro (CapMetro) (Austin, TX)  Cascades East Transit (CET) (Bend, OR)  Central Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (CPTA) dba RabbitTransit (York, PA)  Denton County Transit Authority (DCTA) (Denton, TX)  Greater Richmond Transit Company (GRTC) (Richmond, VA)  Livermore Amador Valley Transit Authority (LAVTA) (Livermore, CA)  Los Angeles Metro (LA Metro) (Los Angeles, CA)  Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) (Atlanta, GA)  Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) (Boston, MA)  New York City Transit (NYCT) (New York City, NY)  Omnitrans (San Bernardino, CA)  Pierce Transit (Pierce County, WA)  Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA) (St. Petersburg, FL)  Sacramento Regional Transit District (SacRT) (Sacramento, CA)  San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans) (San Mateo County, CA)  Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) (Philadelphia, PA)  Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (SORTA) (Cincinnati, OH)  Solano Transportation Authority (STA) (Solano, CA)  Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) (Washington, DC) The transit agency interviews captured more nuanced information than provided in the survey, represented unique use cases, and informed case study write-ups. Appendix C contains the interview protocol.

2-3 TNC Interviews Following the transit agency interviews, the research team conducted interviews with TNC policy staff to gain insights on partnership structure and lessons learned. Question content was aimed at the following themes:  Partnership initiation  Goals and anticipated outcome  Pros and cons of different partnership types  Preferred co-marketing arrangement  Data sharing policies Interview findings are discussed throughout this report. Expert Interviews and Background Material In addition to the survey and interviews with transit agencies and TNCs, the research team reviewed previous studies and initiatives addressing similar topics and consulted experts in the field. The purpose was to understand the regulatory landscape for TNC partnerships especially in regards to FTA requirements and the landscape of “sunshine laws,” which allow for public records requests. Interviews consisted of phone and email correspondence with the FTA, the Eno Center for Transportation, the author of TCRP Legal Digest 53: “Legal Considerations in Relationships in Between Transit Agencies and Ride-Sourcing Service Providers,” and experts in data privacy. Expert interview and background material findings are discussed throughout this report.

Next: 3 Transit Agency Survey Results »
Partnerships Between Transit Agencies and Transportation Network Companies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Research Report 204: Partnerships Between Transit Agencies and Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) is designed to help transit agencies that have decided to pursue partnerships with one or more TNCs. The report provides information on where, when, and how partnerships between transit agencies and TNCs should be considered and pursued.

As new mobility service providers emerge, many public transit agencies have partnered, or are in the process of partnering, with such providers. Among these providers are TNCs. While partnerships between transit agencies and private mobility providers are not new, partnerships with TNCs create unique opportunities and challenges as both parties work toward mutually beneficial program models.

TCRP Report 204 provides 20 in-depth case studies of partnerships between transit agencies and TNCs. Its Partnership Playbook synthesizes lessons learned from these case studies and provides step-by-step practical guidance for transit practitioners on how they should be considered and pursued.

The report provides an up-to-date guide on partnerships between transit agencies and TNCs in all stages of development and realization. It covers partnerships developed with several target markets in mind, including:

  • First/last-mile connections to transit;
  • Customers of ADA Paratransit and Demand-Response Services;
  • People traveling in lower density environments;
  • People with late night travel needs; and
  • People with occasional trip needs (e.g. guaranteed ride home).
  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!