National Academies Press: OpenBook

Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management (2019)

Chapter: Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond

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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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Suggested Citation:"Track 5: TAMPS Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25431.
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50 Track 5: TAMPS—Setting the Course for Compliance and Beyond State DOT TAMP Development During this session, moderated by Omar Smadi (CTRE/Iowa State University), several state DOTs shared their experiences in developing their initial TAMPs. In addition, the results of a survey conducted by the Iowa DOT in conjunction with AASHTO were presented. FROM PAPER TO PRACTICES: PUTTING RISK-BASED ASSET MANAGEMENT TO WORK Anne-Marie McDonnell (Connecticut DOT) described the Connecticut DOT’s TAMP journey. She suggested that the agency would not have developed a TAMP without the federal requirement but has found that the process has led it to discover a better way of doing business. In addition to the required chapters, the Connecticut DOT added two additional chapters: one on data management and another on process improvements. Its TAMP incudes all NHS and state-maintained assets. The agency chose to include traffic signals, signs, and several other assets. For each asset class, it developed a two-page fact sheet that describes the asset, defines its state of good repair, and presents information on its average age and performance history. The fact sheets also include an estimated replacement value, performance measures, and performance targets. One of the successes resulting from the program was the performance projection, which proved useful in advocating for the agency’s budget and helped improve transparency. The process has helped build trust between stakeholders and has consolidated asset information. The agency has seen many benefits to having gone through the process, including a focus on data management, better asset tracking, and recognition of risks. It recognizes the need for additional data to help further reduce subjectivity in some decisions and will likely include additional assets in a future TAMP. MINNESOTA: LAND OF 10,000+ ASSETS Shannon Foss (Minnesota DOT) indicated that the Minnesota DOT had been one of three pilot states under a TAMP development project for FHWA. However, because the pilot study took place before the rules were finalized, it did not meet the requirements, so a new TAMP was developed by using agency staff. The work was coordinated out of the agency’s new asset management project office but was supported by asset expert work groups, the TAMP project management team, the TAMP advisory group, and the asset management steering committee. The TAMP includes 12 assets on both the NHS and state-maintained systems. A variety of tools was used to conduct the analysis, including worksheets and spreadsheets when more sophisticated tools were not available. The TAMP is closely

51 integrated with the Minnesota State Highway Investment Plan and has been conditionally certified. VISUALIZING ASSET MANAGEMENT IN NEW MEXICO Tammy Haas (New Mexico DOT) said the New Mexico DOT hired a consultant to help develop its initial TAMP, and the document was certified by the FHWA Division Office. The New Mexico TAMP takes a different approach than most of the other TAMPs. It is written in three parts: Where Are We Now?, Where Are We Headed?, and How Do We Get There? Because District offices control the money in New Mexico, the central office needed an effective way to present information to get decisions aligned. They are working on a dashboard and are moving toward a web-based TAMP. Haas indicated that she has seen greater buy-in as people are able to visualize the investment plans. VERMONT’S TAMP Chad Allen (Vermont Agency of Transportation) presented some background information about the Vermont Agency of Transportation and the process used to develop its TAMP. For the most part, the development was done in-house, except for the use of a consultant to assist with graphics. The process involved a 27-member TAMP work group and a 52-month timeline. The TAMP only includes pavements and bridges, but it covers the entire NHS and state-maintained system. Three deliverables were produced: an executive-level brochure, a federal TAMP submittal, and a practitioner’s guide. The TAMP had not yet been certified and Allen indicated that the division office had asked for more detail and fewer pages. Several activities remain to be completed, including the practitioner’s guide and the development of a customer pavement expectations mobile app. STATE DOT USE OF CONSULTANT SUPPORT TO DEVELOP INITIAL TAMPS Matthew Haubrich (Iowa DOT) presented the results of a survey that was distributed by AASHTO to learn more about which state DOTs used consultant assistance in developing their initial TAMP. The survey results can be found on the AASHTO TAM Portal.7 At the time of the conference, only 25 states had responded to the survey. KEY TAKEAWAYS • State DOT TAMPs vary considerably, even though they all followed the same requirements. Most state DOTs tailored their TAMPs to fit their environment. • The development of the initial TAMP was a lengthy process, and some of the documents did not satisfy the requirements without additional modification. • External communication is not very well developed. • The process of developing the TAMP exposed other issues that DOTs are working through. 7 https://www.tam-portal.com/.

52 Transit Agency TAMP Challenges and Opportunities Since FTA’s Final Rule was released in 2016, transit operators have been taking steps to align their TAM practices with the requirements. The presentations in this session provided an overview of the TAM requirements and an opportunity for two transit operators to share their experiences. The session closed with a discussion of how transit agencies can align their practices with international standards. This session, which was moderated by Laura Zale (SEPTA), attracted a standing-room-only crowd made up mostly of transit agencies but included consultants as well. TRANSIT ASSET MANAGEMENT: THE FTA PERSPECTIVE John Giorgis (FTA) opened the session with a presentation primarily focused on compliance with FTA regulations on Transit Asset Management, 49 CFR Part 625, and key technical assistance products that have been released, including the Transit Asset Management Guide, a template for small providers, narrative report templates, and a Facility Performance Measure Guidebook; all of which are available on FTA’s Transit Asset Management portal.8 Fact sheets, compliance checklists, timelines, and points of contact are also available from the portal. Giorgis reviewed the delivery cycle for transit operators and reminded agencies that their data reports need to be provided with the plan being on hand for Triennial Review and that they should share with state DOTs and regional planning organizations. The plan should be updated at least every 4 years, or whenever there is a significant change in priorities. Giorgis also provided a short summary of some of the outcomes from the Transit Roundtable that had taken place during the week, including the importance of a TAM culture, recognizing TAM as a journey, and getting buy-in from across the agency. INTEGRATING FIXED ASSET ACCOUNTING AND ASSET INVENTORIES IN A TRUE ENTERPRISE APPROACH TO ASSET HIERARCHY David Rose (Gannett Fleming) polled the audience and found that 50% of them were involved in the development of their own TAMP. Using the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) as an example, Rose stressed the importance of relating asset management to tangible elements that people work with (such as the financial system, the work order system, or capital planning) to make the TAMP relevant. Matthew Wilson (JTA) provided background information about the agency, including that it has two systems that use different inventories for the same assets. JTA initiated workshops and met with each department to establish parent–child relationships between assets and identified data fields needed for reporting. These activities resulted in a crosswalk of asset account codes that allowed JTA to resolve its data issues. 8 https://www.transit.dot.gov/tam.

53 MAXIMIZING ASSET RETURN ON INVESTMENT FOR SELF AND CLIENTS IN A PUBLIC-SECTOR SETTING Jeff Arbuckle and Ajay Singh (King County Metro Transit) jointly presented. Amy Lindbloom (Sound Transit) and Emily Burns (Seattle DOT) joined the presentation to provide an overview and describe the collaboration between the three agencies. The presenters reported that each agency had characteristics that made it unique, but decisions had to consider regional needs. King County Metro was able to establish evaluation criteria for each asset that allowed it to prioritize assets so that they could be better packaged. The agency also implemented data warehousing tools to support its needs and is currently looking into additional efforts related to risk management, knowledge management, and change management. Certification under ISO 55001,9 an asset management standard developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), is an important goal for the agency to achieve. ISO 5500010—ASSET MANAGEMENT STATE OF READINESS ASSESSMENT CASE STUDIES Jason Bittner (ARA) discussed a readiness assessment conducted in Canada that included two transit agencies. The study found that smaller agencies had more sophisticated TAM programs than larger agencies, which seemed to reflect the good understanding people had of their role in relation to TAM in the smaller agencies. Bittner stressed the importance of looking for quick implementation wins and using participatory strategies to be most effective. He indicated that executive buy-in is a key to a successful implementation, as is having clear roles and responsibilities. Lessons learned indicated that it is important to manage the asset inventory, to have a clear succession plan, and to manage with integrity and consistency. KEY TAKEAWAYS • TAM takes time and requires patience. • Compliance with FTA regulations on Transit Asset Management, 49 CFR Part 625, including certification by the transit agency’s accountable executive, is an element of the Fiscal Year 2018 Annual List of Certifications and Assurances for FTA Grants and Cooperative Agreements. Noncompliance places future FTA grants in jeopardy. • TAM needs to be communicated within the agency constantly. • Data-driven decisions will happen once agencies get better data and align their software programs. • Asset data need to be tailored to the audience. 9 https://www.iso.org/standard/55089.html. 10 https://www.iso.org/standard/55088.html.

54 Discussion Session: Are Our Plans and Targets Aligned? This discussion session was attended by approximately 18 participants, most of whom represented state DOTs. A few representatives from regional planning organizations, local agencies, and FHWA also participated. The tables discussed several questions that were posed to the group by the moderator, Mara Campbell (Jacobs). The questions and responses are provided below. WHAT STRATEGIES HAVE YOUR AGENCIES TAKEN TO COLLECT INFORMATION ON NATIONAL HIGHWAY SYSTEM NEEDS, CONDITIONS, AND REVENUES? WHAT LESSONS HAVE YOU LEARNED FROM THIS PROCESS? • State DOTs have been collecting data for a long time. • In one case, a participant indicated that his agency was reevaluating its pavement management system, as it does not project the new federal performance measures for pavements. • Differences in how agencies are measuring bridges were reported. This does not appear to be done consistently across agencies. • Agencies are having challenges incorporating public–private partnerships and other types of innovative delivery methods in their TAMPs. • Several agencies indicated that they are trying to reduce the variation in conditions between districts. • Some agencies indicated that the national performance measures are not reflective of the total system the transportation agency is responsible for. The national measures have standardized the data, but the measures are not aligned with the TAMP targets and they focus on too short a timeframe. WHAT COMPATIBILITY ISSUES EXISTED BETWEEN STATE AND LOCAL CONDITION DATA THAT HAD TO BE RESOLVED TO DEVELOP PERFORMANCE TARGETS? • There are differences between the desired conditions at the state and local levels. The state DOTs typically expect to maintain higher conditions than the local agencies. • Different thresholds are being established to represent what is considered to be in good condition on the NHS and on non-NHS roads. Expectations for Interstates are higher than those for local roads. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY EFFORTS TO SHARE STATE DOT ANALYSIS TOOLS AT THE REGIONAL OR LOCAL LEVEL TO SUPPORT ASSET MANAGEMENT? • For most of the participants there have not been efforts to share tools. The exception was in Michigan, where there is a free pavement management system for the local transportation agencies. All regional planning organizations are required to report pavement and bridge conditions in a consistent manner, but it takes work and training to be able to use the tools effectively.

55 • Work done at the state DOT level for bridge inspections is helping locals. • Some state DOTs collect pavement data on the local roads in addition to the state roads. The Iowa DOT is an example of a state doing this. They share the data with the local transportation agencies, but not the analysis tool. WHAT EFFORTS ARE BEING UNDERTAKEN TO SUPPORT THE USE OF LIFE-CYCLE PLANNING IN MAKING INVESTMENT DECISIONS AT THE REGIONAL AND LOCAL LEVELS? • The New Jersey DOT is sharing knowledge and specifications with local transportation agencies (both informally and formally) on its pavement preservation program. • The Connecticut DOT uses its Local Technical Assistance Program to provide training on LCP to local transportation agencies. • Maricopa County found it hard to coordinate with cities because of jurisdictional issues. As a result, LCP is hard to do. • The Wyoming DOT uses flat deterioration curves for low-volume roads. Treatments are triggered by factors other than life-cycle needs for this part of the network. • The Iowa DOT reports that the local transportation agencies are often more innovative than the state in terms of cost-effective treatments. WHAT STEPS COULD BE TAKEN TO FURTHER DEVELOP A COLLABORATIVE AND COORDINATED EFFORT TO MANAGE THE NHS ON A STATEWIDE OR REGIONAL BASIS? • Identify the assets in the local and state areas and assess conditions for the entire system. • Establish a common language. • Define a common state of good repair. WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR A METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION TO SET ITS OWN TARGET? • It is a positive step that both the regional and state agencies are discussing targets. • It would be interesting to hear from MPOs that cross states to hear what they do. KEY TAKEAWAYS • It is important for state agencies to establish collaboration with local transportation agencies and be on the same page with them. State agencies should communicate with local agencies along the way regarding how to analyze the data and set targets. Several participants found forums to share experiences as very valuable, so agencies can learn what is working and what is not. • Network. • Everyone is in the same boat and trying to figure out how to align decisions. It is a complicated issue for all agencies. • Interaction of state and regional agencies has brought a new perspective on what it means to manage the system.

56 • It would be helpful to have consistent definitions and measurements to use. Additionally, it would be helpful to benchmark counties to the state. Group Transit Asset Management Plan Development Small transit agencies are provided an option to join a group plan for their state of operation. These group plans require strong collaboration between sponsors and operators. This session, modified by John O’Hara (KPMG LLP), provided insights on these group plans with several examples. TIER II GROUP TRANSIT ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN: LESSONS LEARNED IN COORDINATING WITH SMALL TRANSIT OPERATORS Justin Barclay (Maryland Transit Administration) discussed the lessons his agency learned during its efforts to coordinate TAMP development with small transit operators. He outlined the process used to develop the TAMP and the workshops that were conducted over a 4-year period to address the skills needed. He also described the resources provided to support the effort and the Group Transit Asset Management Policy that was signed by all Tier II accountable executives as part of the process. Several tools were developed to support the TAM processes, including inventory submission forms, a Facility Condition Assessment Guidebook, and a performance dashboard. Barclay also described the group’s use of FTA’s TERM Lite program to support the TAMP development process. REGIONAL GROUP TAMP FOR 16 TIER II OPERATORS IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA REGION Shruti Hari [Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC)] discussed MTC’s role in regional asset management and the process used to develop the region’s TAMP. Hari explained that MTC had a role in target setting, the development of a TAM plan for Tier II operators, technical assistance for Tier I operators, and regional TAM strategic planning. The TAMP development process included all Tier II operators in the region and followed several guiding principles, including maintaining the region’s asset inventory (so as to better invest in a state of good repair), monitoring and improving the condition of the system, investing in a state of good repair, and maintaining a list of investment priorities. Several workshops were conducted to get all operators aligned and to develop procedures for uniformly reporting asset conditions. Hari presented an overview of the TAMP and concluded with lessons learned from the process. IOWA’S APPROACH TO TRANSIT ASSET MANAGEMENT GROUP PLAN Sreeparna Mitra (Iowa DOT Office of Public Transit) discussed the Iowa DOT’s approach to developing a group TAMP for rural and small urban transit systems. The process began with a survey of 23 agencies to get a baseline assessment of the asset management practices currently in place. She also described two tools developed to support these

57 efforts: the Public Transit Management System for revenue vehicles, which prioritizes vehicles to be funded for replacement, and a Transit Asset Management App for Facilities Condition Assessment. The process taught the Iowa DOT the importance of starting data collection efforts early. The most difficult challenge the agency faced was the diversity of skills, data availability, and different internal procedures among group plan participants. Mitra also stressed the importance of educating and coordinating with subrecipients throughout the process. Risk and Resilience in TAMPs The presentations in this session explored strategies for considering system resilience in an asset management program and in an agency’s TAMP. The session was well attended, with more than 60 attendees. Scott Zainhofsky (North Dakota DOT) served as moderator for the session. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING THE RESILIENCY OF TRANSPORTATION ASSETS Prashant Ram (Applied Pavement Technology, Inc.) suggested that all practitioners must be responsive and adaptable to changes that occur regularly. He discussed three major impacts associated with extreme weather events—temperature, precipitation, and sea level—and suggested that an agency’s vulnerability to these events is highly context sensitive, depending on the type, condition, and location of the asset as well as the agency’s preparedness and adaptive capabilities. Ram offered suggestions for improving resiliency that ranged from addressing vulnerabilities to considering resilience in the planning, design, and project development processes. He reviewed FHWA’s guidance for assessment and adaptation and illustrated the concept using two examples. The first example featured a pilot project involving the Minnesota DOT in which vulnerability to flooding in two districts was assessed. The second example came from the New York State DOT and involved a scour-critical bridge study. Ram’s conclusion from these two studies is that resiliency needs to be accounted for in asset management planning. USING RESILIENCE IN RISK-BASED ASSET MANAGEMENT PLANS YuanChi Liu and Sue McNeil (University of Delaware) presented a resiliency life-cycle approach that can be applied in mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery associated with extreme weather events. Three keys to the approach involve robustness, rapidity, and resourcefulness. These three factors are combined to produce an improvement value that can be compared with other scenarios. A second approach was also explored in which vehicle miles or travel time were considered, and this approach provided a way for an agency to move from a qualitative risk framework to a more robust, quantitative assessment based on data.

58 APPROACHES FOR ADDRESSING EXTREME WEATHER RESILIENCE IN ASSET MANAGEMENT Stephen Gaj and Robert Kafalenos (FHWA) jointly presented on the requirements for considering risk and resilience in an agency’s decision-making process. In part, risk was incorporated into the rules because the frequency of extreme weather events is increasing and the cost to the public is expected to grow. The two introduced the plethora of resources that are available to help transportation agencies consider extreme weather resilience in their TAMP LCP. They also mentioned that six asset management resiliency pilot projects are under way and that guidance on this topic should be available early in 2019. ARIZONA DOT TAM RISK MANAGEMENT: EXTREME WEATHER—BLENDING RISK, SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING Steven Olmsted (Arizona DOT) discussed the risk strategies and studies that are being used at the Arizona DOT to influence agency decisions. He said that the agency formalized its resiliency process in October 2015 and that it continues to be tied to the asset life-cycle process. The process compiles data in the agency’s GIS. Root cause screening, modeling, proxy indicators (e.g., Twitter reports), and decision trees are used to develop a mitigation strategy. After each event, the agency conducts ground-based and drone lidar to monitor whether treatments are working. The next step in the Arizona DOT process is to develop economic measures and evaluate maintenance expenses associated with extreme weather events as indirect measures. KEY TAKEAWAYS • Resiliency is recognized as a key component in minimizing asset life-cycle costs. • There are several lead state agencies that are fully engaged in the process and are using the results to support asset management decisions. • Inconsistencies in terminology hinder efforts to incorporate resiliency into agency practices. Coordinating Your TAMPs: Addressing Assets You Do Not Own and Local Agencies You Do Not Own Current legislation set new expectations for interagency coordination that require agencies to work across jurisdictional boundaries to provide the level of mobility expected by the public. The presentations in this session explored these interactives from several different perspectives. The session was moderated by William Knowles (Texas DOT).

59 HOW DOES ASSET MANAGEMENT FIT INTO THE PLANNING TPM FRAMEWORK OF THE OVERALL PERFORMANCE-BASED PROGRAMS OF STATES, MPOS, AND OTHER LOCAL OWNERS? Harlan Miller (FHWA) introduced the federal requirements for TPM and resources available to support performance-based planning processes. Miller reviewed the TPM rules and effective dates as well as the national goal areas. He introduced the 17 performance measures established in the final rules within the national goal areas. Miller stressed the importance of coordinating state DOT and MPO efforts to set targets and the requirements for MPOs, state DOTs, and public transit agencies to establish written agreements for a metropolitan area that describe the roles and responsibilities for performance-based planning. Miller concluded with a summary of references in this area provided by FHWA. THE NOACA CASE STUDY: INTEGRATING TAM INTO THE PLANNING PROCESS Kathy Sarli [Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency (NOACA)] summarized the activities conducted by NOACA to support the preservation of transportation assets in the area. Sarli suggested that NOACA has embraced performance-based planning to ensure that region needs are met, to improve project decision-making, to increase accountability and transparency, and to better communicate the region’s needs when competing for limited resources. To this end, NOACA adopted a TAMP and required local projects seeking regional funding to demonstrate that the project matches recommendations from the regional pavement management system. NOACA has collaborated with the Ohio DOT on federal performance measures and provides community pavement condition reports to its member agencies every 2 years. DEVELOPING AN ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN IN WASHINGTON STATE INCLUDING LOCALLY OWNED ROADS Todd Lamphere (Washington State DOT) discussed the development of a state DOT TAMP that includes locally owned roads. Approximately 23% of the pavements on the NHS in Washington and 9% of the NHS bridges are managed by local agencies. To integrate the efforts of MPOs, cities, and counties, the Washington State DOT established a DOT Technical Group for target setting and a Planning Alignment Working Group that ensured common terminology, shared information, and a concurrent planning effort. These coordinating meetings will continue, and the DOT is working with the Planning Alignment Working Group to complete a 2018 work plan. In addition, the Washington State DOT will provide pavement and bridge condition information to locals to help with their planning activities. ADDRESSING ASSET MANAGEMENT COORDINATION IN NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS Jeff Neal [North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG)] introduced the context for asset management coordination in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, which includes 16 counties, 160 municipalities, and multiple transportation providers. Existing mobility plans for the region predict that less than one-third of the needed funding will be provided to address congestion and maintain pavement and bridge conditions. At the same time,

60 climate and extreme weather events are expected to challenge system mobility and functionality further. Therefore, NCTCOG has expanded its local asset management efforts by incorporating a hazard mitigation plan that considers emergency preparedness coordination, flood assessments, and flood warning systems. The agency is also promoting green infrastructure that helps mitigate negative environmental impacts. Other efforts involve delivering critical services, improving land use and sustainability management, and looking for corridor-driven solutions. NCTCOG’s performance-based planning efforts are now required by legislation passed in 2015 that requires a performance-based planning and programming process with metrics, measures, and scoring for project selection. SETTING COURSE FOR COMPLIANCE AND BEYOND: A CASE STUDY OF STATE, MPO, AND LOCAL AGENCY COORDINATION FOR NHS TARGET SETTING Theresa Romeli (MTC) discussed the challenges associated with state and MPO coordination efforts related to pavement target setting. She stressed that (a) jurisdictions do not differentiate NHS routes in their programs, (b) it is difficult to reconcile performance metric differences, and (c) it is hard to communicate differences in condition assessment approaches. She discussed the approach used to manage local roads in California with the StreetSaver program developed by MTC and the efforts that have been undertaken to reconcile performance metrics and report planned investments in the NHS. MTC is working with Caltrans to work through the statewide needs assessment process and plans to continue efforts to improve target setting and the consistency of communication related to infrastructure conditions. In addition, MTC hopes to strengthen the relationship between the Pavement Condition Index used by many local agencies and the pavement serviceability rating allowed to report roughness on local roads with speed limits below 40 miles per hour. Advancing Practices in Strategic TAMP Development This session, moderated by Matthew Haubrich (Iowa DOT), featured presentations exploring the future frontiers for TAMP development. The presentations covered a range of topics, including intellectual property concerns, moving from a condition-based assessment to a performance-driven asset management plan, interface opportunities for safety and asset management systems, and chasing excellence through the implementation of asset management standards. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY CONCERNS IN ASSET MANAGEMENT PLANNING Jason Bittner (ARA) presented the results from a recent NCHRP research project that resulted in the publication of NCHRP Report 799: Management Guide to Intellectual Property

61 for State Departments of Transportation.11 He began the presentation by introducing forms of intellectual property (IP) that should be protected, including patents, copyrights, trademarks, confidential information, and works for hire. Bittner emphasized that the largest risks to state DOTs with respect to IP include database development, specialty software, reports and graphics, logos and program branding, and third-party claims to DOT IP. He stressed the importance of protecting IP from a risk management perspective to maximize taxpayer value. Bittner shared that the Texas and South Dakota DOTs will be conducting workshops on the implementation of the guide soon. MOVING FROM A CONDITION-BASED 20-YEAR NEEDS ASSESSMENT TO A PERFORMANCE-DRIVEN ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN David Kraft (New York MTA Bridges and Tunnels) and Maxwell Brown (GHD Inc.) discussed the New York MTA’s new performance-based program, which was inspired by the book Good to Great by Jim Collins.12 In the past, 20-year capital needs were established by rolling up needs, conditions, and strategies into a funding need. The new business model focuses on three objectives: customer service, safety, and revenue. Performance criteria are established for each of these objectives along with risk. The new process helps them manage performance (rather than just conditions) and has enabled the agency to make connections between each of its cylinders of excellence (i.e., organizational silos). The process was illustrated by the Bronx–Whitestone Bridge, which had many issues associated with accidents. PRACTICAL INTERFACE OPPORTUNITIES BETWEEN SAFETY AND ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS John Gasparine (WSP) introduced a process for interfacing safety and asset management systems from a transit perspective. He introduced many opportunities for this interface to occur, including the asset inventory (by adding attributes), condition assessment (especially safety-critical assets), capital project prioritization (that consider safety risks), life-cycle management (in partnership with safety staff), competencies/training (including more safety competencies in the training), and technology (using a single system when possible). CHASING EXCELLENCE: HOW DENVER RTD IS TRANSFORMING ITS ASSET MANAGEMENT CAPABILITY THROUGH ISO 55000 Lou Cripps (Denver RTD) and Simon Smith (AMCL) presented the efforts undertaken by the Denver RTD to transform its asset management capabilities. They introduced the challenges the Denver RTD faced, with more than $5 billion in capital assets but less than 11 Bradley, J., J. Mallela, K. Chesnik, and T. Wyatt. 2015. NCHRP Report 799: Management Guide to Intellectual Property for State Departments of Transportation. Washington, D.C.: Transportation Research Board. http://www.trb.org/Publications/Blurbs/172260.aspx. 12 Collins, J. C. 2001. Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap . . . and Others Don’t. New York: Harper- Collins.

62 0.3% allocated to maintenance. Because of the funding situation, the Denver RTD shifted its focus from building and system expansion to operating and maintaining existing assets with the ISO 55000 standard to drive the process. The agency established the following key improvement areas: • Having a functional and effective management system, • Establishing integrated asset management processes, • Providing enhanced asset information, • Improving data quality and performance, and • Supporting learning and communicating. The process had a tremendous impact on the agency, allowing it to assess its current position, which provided the information needed to allow the agency to determine what changes were needed to achieve its goals. As a result, the agency changed its focus from managing assets to moving people. Lessons learned included taking a generational approach to the process, starting with a standard to drive the process, and bringing in outside assistance sooner to facilitate change management within the organization. KEY TAKEAWAYS • TAM principles can be applied to manage transportation system service (or performance) targets, as well as physical condition. • Agencies are beginning to recognize IP as an important risk that needs to be managed. • A strong interface between safety and asset management is important to transit agencies.

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TRB’s Conference Proceedings on the Web 25: Proceedings of the 12th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management is a compilation of the presentations and summary of the ensuing discussions at a July 14–15, 2018, meeting held in San Diego, California.

During the meeting, attendees explored the development of integrated investment decisions within an uncertain financial planning environment; and the development and implementation of data systems, best practices in data collection, methods used to estimate the expected return on investment, and strategies for communicating results.

The meeting also addressed best practices and lessons learned from Transit Asset Management (TAM) implementation efforts; offered a forum for the sharing of organizational transformations and key strategies for building an effective TAM workforce; and explored the development and maturation of agency transportation asset management plans (TAMPs).

The structure of the program also ensured that transit and risk and resilience were included in the areas of exploration during the meeting.

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