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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implementing Strategies to Enhance Public Health Surveillance of Physical Activity in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25444.
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Appendix F

Committee Member Biosketches

Russell R. Pate, Ph.D., M.S., is professor of exercise science at the Norman J. Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia. Dr. Pate’s research interests and expertise focus on physical activity measurement, determinants, and promotion in children and youth. He also directs a national postgraduate course aimed at developing research competencies related to physical activity and public health. Dr. Pate is involved in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–funded Prevention Research Center at the University of South Carolina. His research includes studies on preschoolers’ physical activity levels and how schools can influence these levels, as well as multicenter trials on the promotion of physical activity among middle and high school–age girls. Dr. Pate was a member of the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee of the Department of Health and Human Services (2008 and 2018) and served on the 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. He is a past president of both the American College of Sports Medicine and the National Coalition on Promoting Physical Activity. Dr. Pate served as a member of several obesity-related committees including the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention, the Roundtable on Obesity Solutions, and was the chair of the Committee on Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth. He received a Ph.D. in exercise physiology from the University of Oregon.

Genevieve Fridlund Dunton, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an associate professor of preventive medicine and psychology at the University of Southern California (USC). Dr. Dunton’s research examines the etiology of health behaviors

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implementing Strategies to Enhance Public Health Surveillance of Physical Activity in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25444.
×

related to chronic disease risk in children and adults, with a focus on physical activity and nutrition. Dr. Dunton is the director of the USC REACH (Real-Time Eating Activity and Children’s Health) lab, whose goals are to develop, test, and apply real-time data capture methodologies, including ecological momentary assessment (EMA) and wearable sensors, to better understand the effects of time-varying psychological, social, and environmental factors on eating and physical activity episodes. She is the principal investigator on six large studies funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Cancer Society, author of more than 120 peer-reviewed publications, and past chair of the American Public Health Association Physical Activity Section. She earned a doctorate in health psychology from the University of California, Irvine, and an M.P.H. from USC. Dr. Dunton received postdoctoral training in physical activity, nutrition, and cancer prevention from the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program at the National Cancer Institute, where she worked in the Health Promotion Research Branch.

Elizabeth A. Joy, M.D., M.P.H., is the medical director for Community Health, Health Promotion and Wellness, and Nutrition Services at Intermountain Healthcare in Utah, and practices family medicine and sports medicine at the Salt Lake Clinic LiVe Well Center. She is an adjunct professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Joy served as president for the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) (2016–2017). She serves on the Exercise is Medicine Governance Committee for ACSM, and chairs the Healthcare Workgroup for the National Physical Activity Plan. She completed her master’s degree in public health at the University of Utah and received her M.D. from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Joy completed a family medicine residency and sports medicine fellowship at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Keshia M. Pollack Porter, Ph.D., M.P.H., is a professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research advances policies that create safe and healthy environments where people live, work, play, and travel. Dr. Pollack Porter focuses on identifying policy solutions to prevent injuries, promote active transportation and play, address social determinants of health, reduce disparities, and advance health equity. She directs the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–supported Physical Activity Policy Research Network Plus (PAPRN+), which advances the dissemination and implementation of policies and programs that promote physical activity and address inequities. Dr. Pollack Porter also works on optimizing the use of health impact assessment and related approaches to advance health in all policies at the local,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implementing Strategies to Enhance Public Health Surveillance of Physical Activity in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25444.
×

state, and federal levels. Dr. Pollack Porter received her Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University and an M.P.H. from the Yale School of Public Health.

Daniel A. Rodriguez, Ph.D., M.S., is the Chancellor’s Professor of City and Regional Planning and associate director of the Institute for Transportation Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on the relationship between transportation, land development, and the health and environmental impacts that follow. His most recent work focuses on the health and equity impacts of urban transportation policy. Prior to joining Berkeley, Dr. Rodriguez served in the faculty of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was distinguished professor of sustainable communities in the Department of City and Regional Planning and adjunct professor in the Department of Epidemiology. Dr. Rodriguez earned a doctorate in regional and urban planning from the University of Michigan and an M.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

James F. Sallis, Ph.D., is distinguished professor emeritus of family medicine and public health at the University of California, San Diego, and professorial fellow at Australian Catholic University in Melbourne. Dr. Sallis’s primary research interests are promoting physical activity and understanding policy and environmental influences on physical activity, nutrition, and obesity. He has made contributions in the areas of measurement, correlates of physical activity, intervention, and advocacy. He is the author of more than 700 scientific publications and is one of the world’s most cited scientists. Dr. Sallis is a frequent consultant to universities, government agencies, health organizations, and corporations worldwide. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. He received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Memphis State University.

Laurie P. Whitsel, Ph.D., FAHA, is currently the vice president of policy research and translation for the American Heart Association (AHA), helping to translate science into policy at a national level in the areas of cardiovascular disease, stroke prevention, and health promotion. She focuses on AHA’s prevention policy portfolio and has written numerous published papers in the areas of nutrition, physical activity, and obesity prevention, and has led the development of AHA’s strategic policy agenda. Dr. Whitsel helps manage several national relationships for AHA with key public health partners and serves on the Board of Directors for the Health Enhancement Research Organization and the National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity. She has served on expert advisory groups with RAND, the Bipartisan Policy Center, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She has been a sector co-leader for the National Physical Activity Plan and leads AHA’s internal strategic

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implementing Strategies to Enhance Public Health Surveillance of Physical Activity in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25444.
×

plan for physical activity. She serves as an expert peer reviewer for several scientific journals and is a consultant on research grant teams. She gives regular guest lectures at Columbia University. Her Ph.D. is from Syracuse University in nutrition science and she is a fellow and member of AHA’s National Scientific Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implementing Strategies to Enhance Public Health Surveillance of Physical Activity in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25444.
×
Page 181
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implementing Strategies to Enhance Public Health Surveillance of Physical Activity in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25444.
×
Page 182
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implementing Strategies to Enhance Public Health Surveillance of Physical Activity in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25444.
×
Page 183
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implementing Strategies to Enhance Public Health Surveillance of Physical Activity in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25444.
×
Page 184
Implementing Strategies to Enhance Public Health Surveillance of Physical Activity in the United States Get This Book
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Physical activity has far-reaching benefits for physical, mental, emotional, and social health and well-being for all segments of the population. Despite these documented health benefits and previous efforts to promote physical activity in the U.S. population, most Americans do not meet current public health guidelines for physical activity.

Surveillance in public health is the ongoing systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of outcome-specific data, which can then be used for planning, implementation and evaluation of public health practice. Surveillance of physical activity is a core public health function that is necessary for monitoring population engagement in physical activity, including participation in physical activity initiatives. Surveillance activities are guided by standard protocols and are used to establish baseline data and to track implementation and evaluation of interventions, programs, and policies that aim to increase physical activity. However, physical activity is challenging to assess because it is a complex and multidimensional behavior that varies by type, intensity, setting, motives, and environmental and social influences. The lack of surveillance systems to assess both physical activity behaviors (including walking) and physical activity environments (such as the walkability of communities) is a critical gap.

Implementing Strategies to Enhance Public Health Surveillance of Physical Activity in the United States develops strategies that support the implementation of recommended actions to improve national physical activity surveillance. This report also examines and builds upon existing recommended actions.

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