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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Finding Hazardous Asteroids Using Infrared and Visible Wavelength Telescopes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25476.
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Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Finding Hazardous Asteroids Using Infrared and Visible Wavelength Telescopes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25476.
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Page 61

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

E Acronyms ATLAS Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert System AU astronomical unit CSS Catalina Sky Survey DART Double Asteroid Redirect Test DoD Department of Defense EAC Earth approaching comet ESA European Space Agency FRM Fast Rotating Model GSFC Goddard Space Flight Center IR infrared IRAS Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRSA Infrared Science Archive ISO Infrared Space Observatory JFC Jupiter-family comet JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory K-T Cretaceous-Tertiary LINEAR Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research LONEOS Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search LPC long-period comet LSST Large Synoptic Survey Telescope MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology MPC Minor Planet Center NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NEA near Earth asteroid NEAT Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking NEATM Near Earth Asteroid Thermal Model NEO near Earth object PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION E-1

NEOCam Near-Earth Object Camera NEOO Near Earth Objects Observation NEOWISE Near Earth Object Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer NRC National Research Council Pan-STARRS Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System PDCO Planetary Defense Coordination Office PDS Planetary Data System ROSES Research Opportunities in Earth and Space Sciences SDT Science Definition Team SmallSat small satellite SST Space Surveillance Telescope STM Standard Thermal Model STPI Science and Technology Policy Institute TRL technology readiness level WISE Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION E-2

Finding Hazardous Asteroids Using Infrared and Visible Wavelength Telescopes Get This Book
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Near Earth objects (NEOs) have the potential to cause significant damage on Earth. In December 2018, an asteroid exploded in the upper atmosphere over the Bering Sea (western Pacific Ocean) with the explosive force of nearly 10 times that of the Hiroshima bomb. While the frequency of NEO impacts rises in inverse proportion to their sizes, it is still critical to monitor NEO activity in order to prepare defenses for these rare but dangerous threats.

Currently, NASA funds a network of ground-based telescopes and a single, soon-to-expire space-based asset to detect and track large asteroids that could cause major damage if they struck Earth. This asset is crucial to NEO tracking as thermal-infrared detection and tracking of asteroids can only be accomplished on a space-based platform.

Finding Hazardous Asteroids Using Infrared and Visible Wavelength Telescopes explores the advantages and disadvantages of infrared (IR) technology and visible wavelength observations of NEOs. This report reviews the techniques that could be used to obtain NEO sizes from an infrared spectrum and delineate the associated errors in determining the size. It also evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques and recommends the most valid techniques that give reproducible results with quantifiable errors.

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