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Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative (2020)

Chapter: Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
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Appendix M

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Allen L. Schirm (Chair) retired from Mathematica Policy Research after holding several positions, including vice president, director of human services research, director of methods, and senior fellow. He has extensive experience conducting evaluations and deriving statistical estimates pertaining to federal and state programs for food and nutrition assistance, as well as education and other support programs for at-risk youth. He is a National Associate of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and has contributed to 16 National Academies reports as a chair and committee member, including as chair of the Panel on Estimating Children Eligible for School Nutrition Programs Using the American Community Survey and as a member of the Committee on Affordability of National Flood Insurance Program Premiums. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA) and former chair of the ASA Social Statistics Section. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Burt S. Barnow is Amsterdam professor of public service and of economics at George Washington University. Previously, he was associate director for research at Johns Hopkins University’s Institute for Policy Studies; on the staff of the Lewin Group; and at the U.S. Department of Labor, including 4 years as director of the Office of Research and Evaluation in the Employment and Training Administration. He has extensive experience conducting research on implementation of large government programs and has published widely in the fields of labor economics and evaluation. He has served on many committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including the Committee for the Context of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×

Military Environments: Social and Organizational Factors; the Committee on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Workforce Needs for the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Defense Industrial Base. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Karen S. Cook is the Ray Lyman Wilbur professor of sociology, director of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, and vice provost for faculty development and diversity at Stanford University. She conducts research on social exchange networks, power and influence dynamics, intergroup relations, negotiation strategies, social justice, and trust in social relations. Her research underscores the importance of trust in facilitating exchange relationships and of networks in creating social capital. She is a recipient of the Social Psychology Section Cooley Mead Award for Career Contributions to Social Psychology of the American Sociological Association. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Board of Trustees of the Russell Sage Foundation, and the Advisory Committee for the Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences at the National Science Foundation. She has served on many committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University.

Susan E. Cozzens is professor emeritus of public policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where she previously served as director of the Technology Policy and Assessment Center and associate dean for research in the Ivan Allen College. She also previously served as director of the Office of Policy Support at the National Science Foundation (NSF) where she coordinated policy and management initiatives for the NSF director, primarily in peer review, strategic planning, and assessment. Her research interests are in science, technology, and innovation policies in developing countries, including issues of equity, equality, and development. She is active internationally in developing methods for research assessment and science and technology indicators. Her service on committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine includes the Committee on Review of the Environmental Protection Agency’s “Science to Achieve Results” Research Grants Program and the Committee on Evaluating the Efficiency of Research and Development Programs at the Environmental Protection Agency. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University.

Barbara Entwisle is Kenan distinguished professor of sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she previously served as vice chancellor for research. She also previously served as director of the Carolina Population Center and as the center’s training program director.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×

Her recent research includes examining the demographic responses to rapid social change, migration and social networks, and the interrelationships between population and environment in Northeast Thailand. She has been involved in the design and implementation of innovative social surveys around the world, including Add Health, the China Health and Nutrition Survey, the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, and the Nang Rong Surveys. She has served on several committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including most recently as chair of the Standing Committee on the Future of Major NSF-Funded Social Science Surveys. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from Brown University.

Ivy Estabrooke is vice president of Corporate Executive Programs and Government Project Systems at PolarityTE, Inc. Previously, she was executive director of the Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative, and she served as the program officer for basic research in the Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare & Combating Terrorism Department at the Office of Naval Research (ONR). While at ONR, she managed a high-risk/high-payoff research portfolio including cutting-edge social and computational science programs and innovative neuroscience programs. She has also developed and implemented a strategy for examining emerging technology areas globally. At the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, she served on the Committee on the Value of Social and Behavioral Science to National Priorities, among others. She has an M.S. in national security strategy and resource management from the Eisenhower School of the National Defense University and a Ph.D. in neuroscience from Georgetown University.

Paul A. Gade retired as a senior research psychologist and the chief of the Basic Research Unit of the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences (ARI), where he developed and led ARI’s intramural and extramural basic research programs. He currently holds a research professor appointment in the organizational sciences and communications department at George Washington University, where his work is focused on the history of ARI. His professional work covers military psychology history, theories and applications of intelligence and individual differences, and the neuroscience of how the brain generates the mind. His current research is on the history of military psychology. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA). He is also past president of the APA Society for Military Psychology and its and current historian. He received the Society’s Charles S. Gersoni award for outstanding contributions to military psychology. He has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Ohio University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×

Robert M. Hauser is the executive officer of the American Philosophical Society and the Vilas research professor and Samuel Stouffer professor of sociology, emeritus, at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Formerly, he served as executive director of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. His research interests include statistical methodology, trends in social mobility and in educational progression and achievement, the uses of educational assessment as a policy tool, and changes in socioeconomic standing, cognition, health, and well-being across the life course. Previously, at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, he directed the Center for Demography and Ecology, the Center for Demography of Health and Aging, and the Institute for Research on Poverty. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Education, and the American Philosophical Society. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan.

Steven G. Heeringa is a senior research scientist at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research and a member of the faculty of the university’s Program in Survey Methods and the Joint Program in Survey Methodology. Previously, he was the University of Michigan principal investigator for the multicenter Army STARRS study of suicide and adverse mental health outcomes in U.S. Army soldiers. He has served as a sample design consultant to international research programs in more than 30 countries worldwide, including Russia, the Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, India, Nepal, China, Egypt, Iran, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, South Africa, and Chile. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. His service at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine includes membership on the Committee to Evaluate the Department of Veterans Affairs Mental Health Services. He has a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan.

Daniel R. Ilgen is John A. Hannah distinguished professor of psychology and management at Michigan State University. He previously held faculty appointments at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, and Purdue University. His research is in the areas of work motivation, team behavior, and leadership. He a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Association, the Academy of Management, the International Association of Applied Psychology, and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. He received the Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award from the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology and the Herbert A. Henneman, Jr. Lifetime Career Achievement Award from the Human Resources Division of the Academy of Management. He has served

Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×

in numerous roles for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including as a member of the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Illinois.

Virginia Lesser is director of the Survey Research Center and department chair and professor in the department of statistics at Oregon State University. Her expertise includes survey methodology, applied statistics, environmental statistics, and ecological monitoring. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. She has served on numerous committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including the Committee on Capitalizing on Science, Technology, and Innovation: An Assessment of the Small Business Innovation Research Program-Phase II and the Committee on the Review of the National Institute of Safety and Health/Bureau of Labor Statistics Respirator Use Survey Program. She has a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Arthur Lupia is the Hal R. Varian professor of political science and research professor at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. His research explores how information and institutions affect policy and politics with a focus on how people make decisions when they lack information. He also works on issues related to data access and research transparency, and the value of social science and political science. He is the recipient of many honors and awards, including the Ithiel de Sola Pool Award from the American Political Science Association, the Warren Mitovsky Innovators Award from the American Association of Public Opinion Research, and the Award for Initiatives in Research of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he is chair of the board at the Center for Open Science. He has a Ph.D. in political science from the California Institute of Technology.

Krisztina Marton (Study Director) is a senior program officer with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has directed many studies at the National Academies, including most recently the Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce. Prior to joining the National Academies staff, she was a survey researcher at Mathematica Policy Research where she conducted methodological research and oversaw data collections for the National Science Foundation, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Agency for Healthcare

Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×

Research and Quality, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and other clients. Previously, she was a survey director in the The Ohio State University Center for Survey Research. She has a Ph.D. in communication with an interdisciplinary specialization in survey research from The Ohio State University.

Kathryn E. Newcomer is professor of public policy and public administration and former director of the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration at George Washington University. She frequently conducts research and training for federal and local government agencies and nonprofit organizations on performance measurement and program evaluation, and she has designed and conducted evaluations for several federal agencies and dozens of nonprofit organizations. She has served on many committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including the Committee on Review of Specialized Degree-Granting Graduate Programs of the DoD in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) and Management and the Committee on Laboratory Security and Personnel Assurance Systems for Laboratories Conducting Research on Biological Select Agents and Toxins. She has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Iowa.

Jeanne C. Rivard (Senior Program Officer) has worked on many studies at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including serving as director of a study on proposed changes to federal regulations for protecting human participants in research and as co-director of a study on the evaluation of the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research and its grantees. She also worked on two studies for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; one on the science of changing behavioral health social norms and the other on behavioral health measurement. Prior to joining the National Academies, she was with the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors Research Institute in Alexandria, Virginia, and on the faculty of the Columbia University School of Social Work in New York City. She has a master’s degree from the University of South Carolina and a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, both in social work.

Adrienne Stith Butler is Associate Board Director of the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has served as the study director for a wide range of National Academies studies, including projects on ending discrimination among people with mental and substance use disorders and on psychosocial interventions for mental and substance use disorders: a framework for establishing evidence-based standards. Prior to her work at the National

Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×

Academies, she was the James Marshall Public Policy Scholar, a fellowship sponsored by the American Psychological Association and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. She is a clinical psychologist and has a doctorate from the University of Vermont. She completed postdoctoral fellowships in adolescent medicine and pediatric psychology at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

Mark L. Weiss retired as the director of the Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences Division of the Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Earlier at NSF he served as senior science adviser and as deputy assistant director of the directorate. Previously, he served as assistant director for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences at the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President, and he was professor and chair of the Department of Anthropology at Wayne State University. His research focuses on the application of genetic approaches to the study of nonhuman primate evolution and behavior. During his career he served on several interagency groups, including as NSF’s representative to the White House’s Committee on Sciences’ Subcommittee on Forensic Science. He has a Ph.D. in physical anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×
Page 179
Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×
Page 180
Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×
Page 181
Suggested Citation:"Appendix M: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25482.
×
Page 182
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The Minerva Research Initiative is a Department of Defense (DoD) social science grant program that funds unclassified basic research relevant to national security. The goal of the program is to make use of the intellectual capital of university-based social scientists to inform understanding of issues important to DoD and the broader national security community. Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative discusses the program's successes and challenges over its first decade of operation, and highlights ways to strengthen the program’s foundations and take advantage of opportunities for broadening its reach and usefulness.

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