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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of Artificial Intelligence for Cybersecurity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25488.
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A

Workshop Agenda

MARCH 12-13, 2019

Day One

WORKSHOP INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT

Welcome

Fred Chang, Workshop Chair, Southern Methodist University

Remarks from Workshop Sponsor

Vinh Nguyen, National Security Agency (Representative of the Sponsor)

Current and Emerging AI Capabilities and Research

Subbarao Kambhampati, Arizona State University

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND CYBERSECURITY OPERATIONS

Currently Deployed AI/ML Tools for Cyber Defense Operations

Moderator: John Manferdelli, Northeastern University

Sven Krasser, CrowdStrike

Alex Kantchelian, Google

Dave Baggett, INKY

Adversarial AI for Cybersecurity: R&D and Emerging Areas

Moderator: Wenke Lee, Georgia Institute of Technology

David Martinez, MIT Lincoln Laboratory

Yevgeniy Vorobeychik, Washington University

Una-May O’Reilly, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of Artificial Intelligence for Cybersecurity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25488.
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Security Risks of AI-Enabled Systems

Moderator: Phil Venables, Goldman Sachs

Nicolas Papernot, Google Brain

Zico Kolter, Carnegie Mellon University

Bo Li, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Plenary Discussion on the Utility and Potential of AI/ML for Cybersecurity

Day Two

UNDERSTANDING OFFENSIVE OR MALICIOUS APPLICATIONS OF AI

Welcome

Fred Chang, Workshop Chair

The Use of AI/ML in Cyberattacks

Moderator: Kathleen Fisher, Tufts University

David Brumley, Carnegie Mellon University and ForAllSecure

Tyler Moore, University of Tulsa

Wyatt Hoffman, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Security Implications of Deep Fakes and Synthetic Media

Moderator: Subbarao Kambhampati, Arizona State University

Delip Rao, AI Foundation

Jay Stokes, Microsoft Research

WRAP-UP DISCUSSION: IDENTIFYING KEY LESSONS AND OPEN QUESTIONS

Please note: Affiliations are for identification purposes only; unless noted, speakers are speaking for themselves and not necessarily for any institutions with which they may be affiliated.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of Artificial Intelligence for Cybersecurity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25488.
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Page 73
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of Artificial Intelligence for Cybersecurity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25488.
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Page 74
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In recent years, interest and progress in the area of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) have boomed, with new applications vigorously pursued across many sectors. At the same time, the computing and communications technologies on which we have come to rely present serious security concerns: cyberattacks have escalated in number, frequency, and impact, drawing increased attention to the vulnerabilities of cyber systems and the need to increase their security. In the face of this changing landscape, there is significant concern and interest among policymakers, security practitioners, technologists, researchers, and the public about the potential implications of AI and ML for cybersecurity.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop on March 12-13, 2019 to discuss and explore these concerns. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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