National Academies Press: OpenBook

Strengthening Post-Hurricane Supply Chain Resilience: Observations from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria (2020)

Chapter: Appendix C: Resources and Tools to Support Information Sharing

« Previous: Appendix B: Overview of the CNA Analyses
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Resources and Tools to Support Information Sharing." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Strengthening Post-Hurricane Supply Chain Resilience: Observations from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25490.
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Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Resources and Tools to Support Information Sharing." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Strengthening Post-Hurricane Supply Chain Resilience: Observations from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25490.
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Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Resources and Tools to Support Information Sharing." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Strengthening Post-Hurricane Supply Chain Resilience: Observations from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25490.
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Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Resources and Tools to Support Information Sharing." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Strengthening Post-Hurricane Supply Chain Resilience: Observations from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25490.
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Page 92

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Appendix C Resources and Tools to Support Information Sharing DHS has established several operations and tools to support information sharing within and among the critical infrastructure sectors.1 These include  Homeland Security Information Network - Critical Infrastructure (HSIN-CI).2 The Homeland Security Information Network is the trusted network for homeland security mission operations to share sensitive but unclassified information. The critical infrastructure community on the network, HSIN-CI, is the primary system through which private sector owners and operators; DHS; and other federal, state, and local government agencies collaborate to protect the nation’s critical infrastructure. HSIN-CI provides real- time collaboration tools including a virtual meeting space, document sharing, alerts, and instant messaging at no charge.  Infrastructure Protection Gateway (IP Gateway) Infrastructure Protection Gateway (IP Gateway).3 The IP Gateway serves as the single interface through which DHS partners can access a large range of integrated infrastructure protection tools and information to conduct comprehensive vulnerability assessments and risk analysis.  National Infrastructure Coordinating Center (NICC).4 The NICC is the 24/7 information coordination and sharing operations center that maintains situational and operational awareness, communication, and coordination among the critical infrastructure public and private stakeholders.  National Risk Management Center (NRMC).5 NRMC evaluates the potential consequences of disruptions across the cyber-physical domain through an integrated analytical approach that implements deliverables required by Presidential Policy Directive 21 and Executive Order 13636.  Protected Critical Infrastructure Information (PCII) Program.6 The PCII Program works with government organizations and the private sector to protect critical infrastructure information needed for effective incident management, as well as steady-state operations and preparedness.  Protective Security Advisors (PSAs).7 PSAs are security subject matter experts strategically deployed across the United States to protect the nation’s critical 1 See https://www.dhs.gov/emergency-services-sector-information-sharing-initiative. 2 See https://www.dhs.gov/hsin-critical-infrastructure. 3 See https://www.dhs.gov/cisa/ip-gateway. 4 See https://www.dhs.gov/cisa/national-infrastructure-coordinating-center. 5 See https://www.cisa.gov/national-risk-management. 6 See https://www.dhs.gov/cisa/pcii-program. 7 See https://www.dhs.gov/cisa/protective-security-advisors. PREPUBLICATION COPY 89

90 STRENGTHENING POST-HURRICANE SUPPLY CHAIN RESILIENCE infrastructure by providing state, local, tribal, territorial, and private sector partners access to DHS risk-mitigation tools, products, and services and by supporting officials responsible for planning and leading responses to major events. In addition, PSAs support response and recovery efforts to hazardous incidents through field-level coordination and information sharing.  TRIPwire (Technical Resource for Incident Prevention).8 TRIPwire is a 24/7, online, collaborative information-sharing and resource portal for bomb technicians, first responders, military personnel, government officials, intelligence analysts, private sector security professionals, and critical infrastructure owners and operators. TRIPwire is designed to increase awareness of evolving improvised explosive device (IED) tactics, techniques, and procedures, as well as share information about incident lessons learned and other counter-IED information. DHS partners with other organizations and platforms to provide additional information-sharing support to its security partners. These include:  Sector-specific agencies (SSAs).9 SSAs maintain ongoing relationships with each critical infrastructure sector and often provide information essential to identify vulnerabilities and all-hazard risks and develop protective programs.  Information Sharing Environment.10 The federal Information Sharing Environment, managed by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, facilitates information- sharing policies, procedures, and technologies.  Fusion centers.11 Numerous states and large cities have established fusion centers to share information and intelligence. DHS also partners with the Regional Consortium of Coordinating Councils, of which the following organizations are members:12 • Alaska Partnership for Infrastructure Protection • All Hazards Consortium • American Logistics Aid Network • Association of Contingency Planners • Bay Area Center for Regional Disaster Resilience • Business Emergency Operations Center • California Resiliency Alliance 8 See https://www.dhs.gov/tripwire. 9 See https://www.dhs.gov/cisa/infrastructure-security-division. 10 See https://www.dni.gov/index.php/nctc-who-we-are/organization/201-about/organization/information-sharing- environment. 11 See https://www.dhs.gov/fusion-centers. 12 See https://rtriplec.wordpress.com/members/. PREPUBLICATION COPY

APPENDIX C 91 • ChicagoFIRST, LLC • Colorado Emergency Preparedness Partnership, Inc. • Cyber Resilience Institute Organization • Cyber Threat Intelligence Network Organization • Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center (FS-ISAC), Business Resiliency Committee • Great Lakes Hazards Coalition • InfraGard Los Angeles Members Alliance • InfraGard Minnesota Members Alliance • InfraGard Pittsburgh Members Alliance • The Infrastructure Security Partnership • Missouri Public Private Partnership • The MITRE Corporation Organization • National Health Information Sharing and Analysis Center • Northeast Disaster Recovery Information X-Change • Pacific Northwest Economic Region • Pittsburgh Regional Business Coalition for Homeland Security • Ready San Diego Business Alliance • RPCfirst • Safeguard Iowa Partnership • Silver Shield - Critical Infrastructure Protection Program • SoCalfirst • South Florida Disaster Resiliency Coalition • Southeast Emergency Response Network • Southeast Wisconsin Homeland Security Partnership, Inc. • U.S. Chamber of Commerce • Utah Public Private Partnership Organization PREPUBLICATION COPY

Next: Appendix D: Regulatory Assistance and Relevant Authorities for Disaster Relief by Federal Agencies »
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Resilient supply chains are crucial to maintaining the consistent delivery of goods and services to the American people. The modern economy has made supply chains more interconnected than ever, while also expanding both their range and fragility. In the third quarter of 2017, Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria revealed some significant vulnerabilities in the national and regional supply chains of Texas, Florida, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. The broad impacts and quick succession of these three hurricanes also shed light on the effectiveness of the nation's disaster logistics efforts during response through recovery.

Drawing on lessons learned during the 2017 hurricanes, this report explores future strategies to improve supply chain management in disaster situations. This report makes recommendations to strengthen the roles of continuity planning, partnerships between civic leaders with small businesses, and infrastructure investment to ensure that essential supply chains will remain operational in the next major disaster. Focusing on the supply chains food, fuel, water, pharmaceutical, and medical supplies, the recommendations of this report will assist the Federal Emergency Management Agency as well as state and local officials, private sector decision makers, civic leaders, and others who can help ensure that supply chains remain robust and resilient in the face of natural disasters.

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