National Academies Press: OpenBook

Guidelines for Traversability of Roadside Slopes (2019)

Chapter: Appendix A - Classification of Vehicle Body Types by NHTSA

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Page 135
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Classification of Vehicle Body Types by NHTSA." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidelines for Traversability of Roadside Slopes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25539.
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Page 135
Page 136
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Classification of Vehicle Body Types by NHTSA." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidelines for Traversability of Roadside Slopes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25539.
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Page 136

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A-1 A P P E N D I X A Classification of Vehicle Body Types by NHTSA This classification of vehicle body type by NHTSA is from 1991 onward, except as noted. INDEX – BODY TYPE DESCRIPTION 01 – Convertible (excludes sunroof, T-bar) 02 – 2-Door Sedan/Hardtop/Coupe 03 – 3-Door/2-Door Hatchback 04 – 4-Door Sedan/Hardtop 05 – 5-Door/4-Door Hatchback 06 – Station Wagon (excluding van and truck-based) 07 – Hatchback, number of doors unknown 08 – Other auto (1991–1993 only) 08 – Sedan/Hardtop, number of doors unknown (since 1994) 09 – Unknown auto type (1991–1993 only) 09 – Other or Unknown automobile type (since 1994) 10 – Auto-Based Pickup 11 – Auto-Based Panel (cargo station wagon, auto-based ambulance or hearse) 12 – Large Limousine – more than 4 side doors or stretch chassis 13 – Three-Wheel Automobile or Automobile Derivative 14 – Compact Utility (ANSI D-16 Utility Vehicle Categories: “Small” and “Midsize”) 15 – Large Utility (ANSI D-16 Utility Vehicle Categories: “Full Size” and “Large”) 16 – Utility Station Wagon 19 – Utility Unknown Body 20 – Minivan 21 – Large Van – Including van-based buses 22 – Step Van or Walk-In Van 23 – Van Motorhome (deleted in 2003 and later) 24 – Van-Based School Bus (1993 to 2002 only) 25 – Van-Based Transit Bus (1993 to 2002 only) 28 – Other Van Type (Hi-Cube Van) 29 – Unknown Van Type 30 – Compact Pickup (Gross Vehicle Weight, GVWR, < 4,500 lbs) 31 – Standard Pickup (4,500 lbs ≤ GVWR < 10,000 lbs) 32 – Pickup with Slide-In Camper 33 – Convertible Pickup 39 – Unknown (pickup style) Light Conventional Truck Type

A-2 Guidelines for Traversability of Roadside Slopes 51 – Cross-Country/Intercity Bus (i.e., Greyhound) 52 – Transit Bus (city Bus) 58 – Other Bus Type 59 – Unknown Bus Type 60 – Step Van 61 – Single-Unit Straight Truck (10,000 lbs. < GVWR ≤ 19,500 lbs.) 62 – Single-Unit Straight Truck (19,500 lbs .< GVWR ≤ 26,000 lbs.) 63 – Single-Unit Straight Truck (GVWR>26,000 lbs.) 64 – Single-Unit Straight Truck (GVWR unknown) 65 – Medium/Heavy Truck-Based Motorhome 66 – Truck/Tractor (cab only, or with any number of trailing units: any weight) 67 – Medium/Heavy Pickup (GVWR > 10,000 lbs.) [since 2001] 71 – Unknown if single-unit or combination unit Medium Truck (10,000 lbs < GVWR < 26,000 lbs) 72 – Unknown if single-unit or combination-unit Heavy Truck (GVWR>26,000 lbs.) 73 – Camper or Motorhome, Unknown Truck Type 78 – Unknown Medium/Heavy Truck Type 79 – Unknown Truck Type 80 – Motorcycle 81 – Moped (motorized bicycle) 82 – Three-Wheel Motorcycle/Moped - Not All-Terrain V 83 – Off-Road Motorcycle (2-wheel) (since 1993) 88 – Other Motored Cycle Type (mini-bikes, motor scooters) 89 – Unknown Motored Cycle Type 90 – ATV (all-terrain vehicle; includes 3 or 4 wheels) 91 – Snowmobile 92 – Farm Equipment Other Than Trucks 93 – Construction Equipment Other Than Trucks (includes graders) 94 – Motorized Wheel Chair (since 1997) 97 – Other Vehicle Type (includes go-cart, forklift, city street sweeper, dune/swamp buggy, golf cart) 99 – Unknown Body Type 40 – Cab Chassis-Based (includes light stake, light dump, light tow, rescue vehicles) 41 – Truck-Based Panel 42 – Light-Truck-Based motorhome (chassis mounted) 45 – Other Light Conventional Truck Type (includes stretched suburban limousine) 48 – Unknown Light Truck Type (not a pickup) 49 – Unknown Light Vehicle Type (automobile, utility vehicle, van or light truck) 50 – School Bus

Next: Appendix B - Risk Measures and Statistical Methods »
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Geometric design practitioners in state transportation agencies have a new set of guidelines on probability of vehicle rollover based on various roadside design features. NCHRP Research Report 911: Guidelines for Traversability of Roadside Slopes will assist practitioners in the reduction of serious injury crashes associated with rollovers on roadside slopes.

Data from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) Crashworthiness Data System (CDS) shows that one-third of single-vehicle run-off-road (SVROR) crashes result in rollovers—the leading cause of fatalities in SVROR crashes. Three-quarters of these rollover crashes involve vehicles digging into the ground on embankments or in ditches after encroaching onto the roadside. Additionally, according to NASS data, pickup trucks, utility vehicles, and vans are overrepresented in rollover crashes due to higher centers of gravity. An increase in the percentage of light trucks in the vehicle fleet necessitates additional research and updates to the roadside safety guidelines.

The researchers conducted 43,000 simulations for various combinations of roadside slope configurations and geometric conditions that represent real-world crash scenarios.

The results helped to produce this guidance on the traversability of roadside slopes for a variety of roadside conditions—shoulder width, foreslope, and foreslope width. The guidelines are presented as probability of vehicle rollover that is defined as a function of various roadside design features.

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