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Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop (2019)

Chapter: Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
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Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
×
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
×
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
×
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
×
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
×
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
×
Page 72
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
×
Page 73
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biosketches of Speakers, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25545.
×
Page 74

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C BIOSKETCHES OF SPEAKERS, MODERATORS, AND PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS42 Kevin Barnett* @KPBarnettPHI Kevin Barnett is a senior investigator at the Public Health Institute (PHI), where he has led research and fieldwork in hospital community benefit and health workforce diversity for over two decades, working with hospitals, government agencies, and community stakeholders across the country. Recent work includes a study of community health assessments and implementation strategies for CDC and a national initiative funded by The Kresge Foundation to align and focus investments by hospitals, other health sector stakeholders, and financial institutions in low- income communities. Current work includes a partnership with the Governance Institute and Stakeholder Health with funding from the RWJF to build place-based population health knowledge among hospital board members and senior leadership, a national study of hospital interventions to address food insecurity, and a partnership with the Carsey School of Public Policy to convene regional meetings of hospital and community teams with community development financial institutions to design intersectoral health improvement strategies. He serves as the co-director of the California Health Workforce Alliance and is on the boards of directors of Communities Joined in Action and Trinity Health System. Kaye Bender Kaye Bender, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, has been the president and Chief Executive Officer of the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) since 2009. Before that, she worked in local public health for several years in Mississippi and was the deputy state health officer for the Mississippi Department of Health for 12 years. She was also the dean of the University of Mississippi Medical Center for 6 years. She chaired the Exploring Accreditation Steering Committee, the precursor study for the establishment of the PHAB. Dr. Bender has served on several IOM (now the National Academy of Medicine) study committees related to public health and nursing. She is an active member of the APHA and a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. She is also a board member of the National Board of Public Health Examiners. She has numerous publications and presentations related to governmental public health infrastructure improvement. Ron Bialek Ron Bialek took over as executive director of the Public Health Foundation (PHF) in 1996, with 15 years’ experience in public health practice and in academia, and became the president of PHF in June 1999. He brings to PHF a wealth of experience in state and local public health practice and linking public health practitioners with academic institutions. Mr. Bialek manages all aspects of the organization and is responsible for the quality of its products. He directed PHF activities 42 *denotes planning committee member, †denotes roundtable member 63 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

64 WORKFORCE FOR POPULATION HEALTH IMPROVEMENT over the past 3 years that have led to using distance learning techniques to train over 10,000 public health professionals annually. Mr. Bialek serves on a variety of government advisory groups and cochaired the Managed Care and Public Health subcommittee of the Public Health Functions Working Group. He works closely with the PHF board of directors and public health professionals to develop and implement research, training, and technical assistance activities to benefit public health agencies in their performance of public health services. Before joining PHF, Mr. Bialek was on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health for 9 years and served as director of the Johns Hopkins Health Program Alliance. In both roles, Mr. Bialek took the theory of public health practice out into the field and developed an outstanding reputation locally and nationally for his efforts in facilitating linkages between academic institutions and public health agencies. At the national level, he has directed such projects as the Public Health Faculty/Agency Forum and the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice. The forum project resulted in recommendations for improving the relevance of public health education to practice and spelled out the various competencies that are desirable for practicing public health. Mr. Bialek still serves as director of the Council on Linkages and continues to play a key role in developing strategies and programs to implement the forum recommendations throughout the country. In addition, Mr. Bialek is codirecting a national effort to develop public health practice guidelines for use by public and private organizations with population-based responsibilities. At the state and local levels, Mr. Bialek has done much to improve collaboration between public health agencies and Johns Hopkins. He developed and directed projects that included assessing community public health needs and resources, creating evaluation protocols for local health department services, providing technical support to and staffing for the Maryland Association of County Health Officers, and establishing a public health grand rounds series for state and local health department employees. Mr. Bialek cochaired the Coalition for Local Public Health in Maryland, which was successful in getting signed into law certain funding mandates to support essential local public health services. He has also served on several state committees and is currently a member of the Prevention Block Grant Advisory Committee for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Mr. Bialek also has extensive teaching experience in the areas of public health practice, AIDS health policy and management, and community health assessment. He has provided community health assessment training to over 200 health departments and community-based organizations, and he is currently developing a distance learning course in this topic area for CDC. Mr. Bialek received his B.A. in political science and M.P.P. in public policy from Johns Hopkins University. Nisha Botchwey* @NishaBotchwey Nisha Botchwey is an associate professor of City and Regional Planning at the Georgia Institute of Technology and an adjunct professor in Emory University’s School of Public Health. An expert in health and the built environment as well as community engagement, she holds graduate degrees in both urban planning and public health. Dr. Botchwey codirects the National Physical Activity Research Center, PARC, and both the Atlanta Neighborhood Quality of Life and Health Dashboard and the data dashboard for Health, Environment, and Livability for Fulton County. She also directs the Built Environment and Public Health Clearinghouse. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C 65 Dr. Botchwey’s research focuses on health and the built environment, health equity, community engagement, and data dashboards for evidence-based planning and practice. She is co-author of Health Impact Assessment in the USA (2014), convener of a national expert panel on interdisciplinary workforce training between the public health and community design fields, and author of numerous articles, scientific presentations, and workshops. Dr. Botchwey has won distinctions, including an NSF ADVANCE Woman of Excellence Faculty Award, a Hesburgh Award Teaching Fellowship from Georgia Tech, the Georgia Power Professor of Excellence Award, a Rockefeller-Penn Fellowship from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Nursing, and a Nominated Changemaker by the Obama White House’s Council on Women and Girls. She has also served on the advisory committee to the director for CDC and is a member of the Social Sciences Panel member for the Ford Foundation’s Fellowship Program and of the Voices for Healthy Kids Strategic Advisory Committee for the American Heart Association. Orson Brown Orson Brown is a senior CHW at the Penn Center for Community Health Workers, a national center of excellence dedicated to advancing health in low-income populations through effective CHW programs. Mr. Brown has provided intensive, personalized support to hundreds of patients to help them set and achieve health goals. In addition to his direct work with patients, he has trained new CHWs across the country and taught medical students about the social determinants of health. Mr. Brown also mentors youth who live in Southwest Philadelphia and serves as a deacon in his church. Brian Castrucci @BrianCCastrucci Brian C. Castrucci, Dr.P.H., M.A., is the Chief Executive Officer at the de Beaumont Foundation. In just 6 years, he has built the foundation into a leading voice in health philanthropy and public health practice. An award-winning epidemiologist with 10 years of experience working in state and local health departments, Dr. Castrucci brings a unique perspective to the philanthropic sector that allows him to shape and implement visionary and practical initiatives and partnerships and bring together research and practice to improve public health. Under his leadership, the de Beaumont Foundation is advancing policy, building partnerships, and strengthening the public health system to create communities where people can achieve their best possible health. The projects he has spearheaded include CityHealth, the BUILD Health Challenge, and PH WINS. Dr. Castrucci has published more than 50 articles in the areas of public health systems and services research, maternal and child health, health promotion, and chronic disease prevention. His recent work has focused on the public health needs of large cities, the need for better data systems, and public health system improvements. He is also an editor and contributing author to The Practical Playbook: Public Health and Primary Care Together, published by Oxford University Press in 2015. Dr. Castrucci earned his doctorate in public health leadership at the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor of arts in political science from North Carolina State University and a master of arts in sociomedical sciences from Columbia University. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

66 WORKFORCE FOR POPULATION HEALTH IMPROVEMENT Marthe Gold† Marthe Gold, M.D., M.P.H., is a senior scholar at The New York Academy of Medicine in 2015, where her primary focus is on implementing methods to gain informed public participation in decisions that affect them. Nationally, she has worked in different communities to capture resident guidance for decision makers interested in implementing health-related policy changes to advance the health of the populations they serve. A graduate of the Tufts School of Medicine and the Columbia School of Public Health, Dr. Gold has clinical training in family medicine and practiced in rural and urban underserved communities. From 1990 to 1996, she served as senior policy advisor in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health in HHS. She returned to her native New York in 1997 to chair the Department of Community Health and Social Medicine at the CUNY Medical School, whose mission is to train a diverse student body for primary care practice in underserved New York communities. A member of the National Academy of Medicine, Dr. Gold currently serves on its Roundtable on Population Health. She is a member of the New England Comparative Effectiveness Public Advisory Council and immediate past president of the International Society for Priorities in Health. Gary Gunderson*† @GaryGunderson Appointed in July 2012, Dr. Gunderson oversees spiritual care services for patients, families, and medical center staff. He supervises six departments: CareNet Counseling, Chaplaincy and Clinical Ministries (including the Clinical Pastoral Education program), FaithHealth Education, Community Engagement, the Center for Congregational Health, and FaithHealthNC. Dr. Gunderson also nurtures the relationships with more than 4,300 Baptist congregations throughout North Carolina and other large networks of the center’s patients’ faith groups. A recognized expert in congregations and health, Dr. Gunderson previously served as senior vice president of the Faith and Health Division of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare in Memphis, Tennessee. In his 7 years there, he developed a new model of congregational health that became widely known as the “Memphis Model.” Dr. Gunderson became involved in public health through his work with former President Jimmy Carter in Atlanta; he directed the Interfaith Health Program at the Carter Center for a decade. The Interfaith Health Program moved from the Carter Center to the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, where Dr. Gunderson became a research assistant professor in International Health. He also served as a visiting professor in Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Dr. Gunderson has worked extensively with the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. He serves as secretary for Stakeholder Health, a group of 39 health systems committed to more effective engagement with the poor in their communities. He brought the Leading Causes of Life Initiative, an international and interdisciplinary group of fellows working to build an intellectual foundation beyond the purely medical paradigm, to Wake Forest Baptist. He was lead author for a discussion paper based on this work and published by The National Academy of Medicine, “The Health of Complex Human Populations.” In addition to his role in Faith and Health Ministries, Dr. Gunderson holds faculty appointments at the Wake Forest School of Divinity and in Public Health Sciences. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C 67 A Wake Forest University alumnus, Dr. Gunderson has a master of divinity from Emory University in Atlanta, a doctorate of ministry from the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, and an honorary doctorate of divinity from the Chicago Theological Seminary. Lisa Howley @LisaDHowley Lisa Howley is an experienced educational psychologist who has spent more than 20 years in the field of medical education supporting learners and faculty, conducting research, and developing curricula. She joined the Association of American Medical Colleges in 2016 to advance the continuum of medical education, support experiential learning, and drive curricular transformation. Before that, she spent 8 years as the associate DIO and AVP of Medical Education and Physician Development for the Carolinas HealthCare System in North Carolina. In that role, she led a number of medical education initiatives across the professional development continuum, including GME accreditation and physician leadership development for the large integrated health care system. She concurrently served as associate professor at the UNC School of Medicine, where she led curriculum and faculty development. She also held a faculty appointment in educational research at UNC at Charlotte, where she taught social science research methods and led or collaborated on numerous studies of effective education. From 1996 to 2001, she was a member of the medical education faculty at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, where she designed and led performance-based assessments and simulation- enhanced curricula. She received her bachelor’s in psychology from the University of Central Florida and both her master of education and Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Virginia. Shanteny Jackson Shanteny Jackson is a bilingual certified CHW in the Richmond City health district. She is also the president of the VA Community Health Worker Association. Ms. Jackson holds a master’s in counseling with a concentration in human services and addiction. She is known as a compassionate collaborator and community advocate. Ms. Jackson has a long-standing service background, with a diverse set of work experiences. She enjoys giving back and being a helpful resource to her community. In her current role, Ms. Jackson has had the opportunity to lead community and social projects. Kevin Jordan Kevin Jordan is a CHW currently working with Damien Ministries, overseeing its HIV prevention services in Washington, DC. The scope of his work ranges from street outreach to administrative and data reporting to funders. Mr. Jordan has 5 years of combined experience in public health, particularly in the HIV field. Mr. Jordan first started as a peer advocate for the Children’s National Adolescent Education Program (APEP), a high school program for DC public school students. He was an intern at the World Bank Group (WBG), Sustainable Development Network (SDN), where he had the opportunity to provide technical (IT) support. He volunteered for La Clinica del Pueblo (LCDP) and shortly after became a Promotor de Salud (“health promoter,” or CHW). Mr. Jordan was then appointed to the health impact specialist position at the DC department of health, working on the IMPACT DMV 1509 project, a CDC-funded grant that expands PrEP coverage and creates a holistic care model for populations at risk in the DC metropolitan area. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

68 WORKFORCE FOR POPULATION HEALTH IMPROVEMENT Mr. Jordan is a member of the University of Maryland College Park Community Advisory Board for DACA students. He is also part of the focus group for the research portion of the project as a DACA recipient himself. Additionally, he is a member of the Maryland Community Health Worker Advisory Committee, appointed by governor Larry Hogan. He is also involved with the IPHI Professional Association of Community Health Workers and DC Department of Health’s CHW committee. Shreya Kangovi @ShreyaKangovi Shreya Kangovi is the founding executive director of the Penn Center for Community Health Workers, a national center of excellence dedicated to advancing health in low-income populations through effective CHW programs, and an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. She is a leading expert on improving population health through evidence-based CHW programs. Dr. Kangovi led the team that designed IMPaCT, a standardized, scalable CHW program, which has been delivered to nearly 10,000 high-risk patients and proven in three randomized controlled trials to improve chronic disease control, mental health, and quality of care while reducing total hospital days by 65 percent. The IMPaCT program has been disseminated to over 1,000 organizations across the country and is being replicated by VA, state Medicaid programs, and large integrated health care organizations in rural and urban settings. Dr. Kangovi has authored numerous scientific publications, including in New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association and Health Affairs, and received over $20M in funding, including grants from National Institutes of Health and the Patient-centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). Laura Rasar King Laura Rasar King, Ed.D., M.P.H., serves as the executive director of the Council on Education for Public Health. Dr. King has more than 15 years of experience leading public health and higher education organizations in their quality assurance and improvement efforts. Her work and career have focused on bridging the gap between the needs of the public health workforce and academic public health. Working with faculty, practitioners, alumni, academic administrators, and employers in a multiyear process, CEPH developed outcomes-focused accreditation criteria for both the M.P.H. and Dr.P.H. programs. These criteria require specific foundational competencies of all graduate students for the first time since the inception of accreditation in public health. Under her leadership, the organization has more than doubled the number of accredited public health schools and programs, initiated accreditation of undergraduate public health programs, and extended its reach internationally. Dr. King has been integral to advancing workforce development efforts in public health through her professional activities. As a member of the National Board of Public Health Examiners since 2013, she served on the Job Task Analysis steering committee, which completed the first-ever survey and analysis of the tasks in which public health practitioners, in all settings, are engaged on a day-to-day basis. She participates regularly on task forces and work groups led by the Association of Schools and Programs in Public Health, advising on issues such as articulation between undergraduate and graduate public health education and innovations in pedagogy. She offered her accreditation expertise and supported the development of the PHAB, serving on their Workforce Think Tank (2011–2013) and Assessment Process Work Group (2008–2014). She was also a member of the Division Board for Professional Development of the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (2004–2009) and the National Task Force for PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C 69 Accreditation in Health Education. In addition, she has held a variety of appointed and elected positions in the APHA, including as a member of the education board. She was the 2002 Judith R. Miller Award recipient for service to the PHEHP section and APHA in support of the practice and profession of health education. Dr. King also serves in a variety of capacities in the higher education accreditation community. She is the immediate past chair of the Association of Specialized and Professional Accreditors (ASPA), where she is also chair of the Education Policy Committee. In her role with ASPA, she testified before the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee about professional education and specialized accreditation and is currently the primary negotiator for specialized accreditation in the Accreditation and Innovation Negotiated Rulemaking process as regulations are developed for the Higher Education Act. She regularly advocates for professional education and its connection to workforce needs, especially in the health professions, and the importance of quality assurance programs at a national level. Dr. King is a frequent speaker on higher education, accreditation, academic public health, and public health workforce issues. She has published several articles in public health journals, including American Journal of Public Health, Health Education & Behavior, Health Promotion Practice, and Frontiers in Public Health. Dr. King earned an Ed.D. in organizational development from Northeastern University. Her dissertation work focused on the development and design of Dr.P.H. programs in schools of public health. She holds an M.P.H. in health promotion and disease prevention from the George Washington University (GWU) Milken Institute School of Public Health and a B.A. in psychology from American University. Sanne Magnan† Sanne Magnan, M.D., Ph.D., is the co-chair of the National Academies’ Roundtable on Population Health Improvement. She is the former president and CEO of the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI) (2006–2007; 2011–2016). In 2007, she was appointed commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Health by governor Tim Pawlenty. She served from 2007 to 2010 and had significant responsibility for implementing Minnesota’s 2008 health reform legislation, including the Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP), standardized quality reporting, development of provider peer grouping, certification process for health care homes, and baskets of care. Dr. Magnan was a staff physician at the Tuberculosis Clinic at St. Paul—Ramsey County Department of Public Health (2002–2015). She was a member of the Population-based Payment Model Workgroup of the Healthcare Payment Learning and Action Network (2015–2016) and CMS Multisector Collaboration Measure Development Technical Expert Panel (2016). She is on Epic’s Population Health Steering Board and the Healthy People 2030 Engagement Subcommittee. She served on the boards of MN Community Measurement and NorthPoint Health & Wellness Center, an FQHC and part of Hennepin Health. Her previous experience also includes VP and medical director of consumer health at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota. Currently, she is a senior fellow with HealthPartners Institute and an adjunct assistant professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Magnan holds an M.D. and a Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry from the University of Minnesota and is a board-certified internist. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

70 WORKFORCE FOR POPULATION HEALTH IMPROVEMENT Phyllis Meadows†* As a senior fellow in the Health Program, Phyllis D. Meadows, Ph.D., R.N., M.S.N., engages in all levels of grant-making activity. Since joining The Kresge Foundation in 2009, she has advised the health team on the development of its overall strategic direction and provided leadership in the design and implementation of grant-making initiatives and projects. Dr. Meadows has coached team members and created linkages to national organizations and experts in the health field. In addition, she regularly reviews grant proposals, aids prospective grantees in preparing funding requests, and provides health-related expertise. “As a health professional, it is gratifying to see that Kresge recognizes the importance of public health and has made a major commitment to investing in the sector,” Dr. Meadows says. “This is a fabulous opportunity for me to work on the ground floor with a major national foundation in shaping the direction and scope of its philanthropic funding for health.” Dr. Meadows’s 30-year career spans the nursing, public health, academic, and philanthropic sectors. She is associate dean for practice at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health and has lectured at Wayne State University’s School of Nursing, Oakland University’s School of Nursing, and Marygrove College. From 2004 to 2009, Dr. Meadows served as deputy director, director, and public health officer at the Detroit department of health and wellness promotion. In the early 1990s, she traveled abroad as a Kellogg International Leadership Fellow and subsequently joined the W.K. Kellogg Foundation as a program director. She also served as director of nursing for the Medical Team—Michigan. Dwyan Monroe As program coordinator of CHW initiatives with IPHI, Dwyan Monroe is part of a team that designs, plans, and delivers training and technical assistance for programs, institutions, and health systems incorporating CHWs and outreach initiatives in the DC, MD, and VA region. She also coaches and supports all IPHI CHWs and manages CHW trainings through the IPHI Center for the Community Health Workforce. IPHI and Ms. Monroe both are widely recognized in the region and nationally for their expertise related to CHWs. A former CHW and current CHW master trainer, Ms. Monroe has nearly 25 years of experience as an advocate for the profession. In 2006, she was appointed director of the New Jersey Community Health Worker Institute, a statewide federally funded initiative of the New Jersey Area Health Education Centers. She worked as a research program coordinator in several clinical and community-based research programs at Johns Hopkins University from 1997 to 2003. Ms. Monroe is a graduate of Hampton University with a bachelor of arts in psychology. She has completed numerous certificate programs in public health leadership, community and clinical health outreach, and community-based program development. Jeremy Moseley* Mr. Moseley was born in Kinston, NC, and attended UNC-Chapel Hill and East Carolina University, with foci in public health, policy, analysis, and management. He worked for the NC Division of Public Health (for 4 years), Duke University, and other health care organizations before coming to Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in 2011. He is director of community engagement in FaithHealth. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C 71 Karen Murphy†* Dr. Karen Murphy is executive VP, chief innovation officer, and founding director of the Steele Institute for Healthcare Innovation at Geisinger. Dr. Murphy has worked to improve and transform health care delivery throughout her career in both the public and private sectors. Before joining Geisinger, she served as Pennsylvania’s secretary of health and addressed the most significant health issues facing the state, including the opioid epidemic. Earlier, Dr. Murphy was director of the State Innovation Models Initiative at CMS, leading a $990 million CMS investment designed to accelerate health care innovation across the United States. She previously served as president and CEO of the Moses Taylor Health Care System in Scranton and as founder and CEO of Physicians Health Alliance, Inc., an integrated medical group practice within Moses Taylor. Dr. Murphy earned her doctorate of philosophy in business administration from the Temple University Fox School of Business. She holds a master’s of business administration from Marywood University, a bachelor of science in liberal arts from the University of Scranton, and a diploma in nursing from the Scranton State Hospital School of Nursing. An author and national speaker on health policy and innovation, Dr. Murphy also serves as a clinical faculty member at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. Adriana Rodriguez Palacios Adriana Rodriguez Palacios is originally from Mexico City. She arrived in Oregon in her middle school years and remained there ever since. Her work with Promotores de Salud de la Iglesia (translated as Church Community Health Workers) began in 2006. That work motivated her to continue her education in public health and simultaneously continue to advocate for CHWs in the workforce. In 2012, she joined her colleagues in the creation of the Oregon Community Health Worker Association, and she continues to serve on its board and work with the community as a CHW. Kalpana Ramiah @KRamiah Dr. Ramiah has a well-established career in public health and health services research that spans two decades. She has extensive experience conducting research and managing federally and privately funded technical assistance projects and research programs. She is highly skilled in patient and family engagement, population health, and measures and materials development. Before joining Essential Hospitals Institute, Dr. Ramiah was a principal researcher at the American Institutes for Research and an assistant research professor at the George Washington University. She managed several major projects in patient engagement, health promotion and disease prevention, quality improvement, cost and coverage, and equity. At GWU, Dr. Ramiah oversaw the technical assistance portfolio of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Aligning Forces for Quality. Dr. Ramiah holds a doctorate and master’s in public health from GWU and a bachelor’s and master’s in nutrition. Dr. Ramiah is part of a number of national advisory committees and technical expert panels. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

72 WORKFORCE FOR POPULATION HEALTH IMPROVEMENT Michael Rhein @MichaelERhein Michael Rhein is the president and Chief Executive Officer at the Institute for Public Health Innovation as the official public health institute serving Maryland, Virginia, and DC, IPHI develops multisector partnerships and innovative solutions to improve the public’s health and well-being across the region, with a focus on strengthening health systems and policy, enhancing community conditions that promote health, and building community capacity to ensure equitable health opportunities for all. Mr. Rhein was involved in launching IPHI in 2009–2010 and has led its first decade of growth and success. Mr. Rhein’s public health career spans 25 years with such organizations as CommonHealth ACTION, the National AIDS Fund, National Association of County and City Health Officials, and the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments. His experience ranges from developing and implementing large-scale national initiatives to working alongside community organizations to design and implement effective public health efforts at a local level. Throughout his career, he has served in intermediary roles, helping to broker public and private resources and facilitate practical support for communities. This has involved collaborating with large national private foundations and corporations; federal, state, and local government agencies; local foundations; academia; health care providers; community-based organizations; and other partners across the country and locally in the DC-MD-VA region. Anna Ricklin Anna Ricklin, AICP, is a passionate advocate for healthy communities. She currently serves at the first health in all policies manager for the Fairfax County, VA health department, where she acts as a health ambassador across county agencies. In this role, Ms. Ricklin promotes the integration of public health objectives into county plans, policies, and building projects. Formerly, Ms. Ricklin led the American Planning Association’s Planning and Community Health Center, where she oversaw applied research and place-based initiatives to advance healthy planning practice. She has a background in health impact assessment, active transportation planning, and cross-sector collaboration, as well as recent work establishing metrics for healthy planning. Ms. Ricklin holds a master of health sciences from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and is based in Washington, DC. Sagar Shah Sagar Shah is a research associate at the American Planning Association’s Planning and Community Health Center. He holds a doctorate in regional development planning from the University of Cincinnati with a focus on healthy urban planning. Dr. Shah is currently involved in applied research projects at APA, connecting urban planning and public health. Previously, he worked on the CDC-funded Communities Putting Prevention to Work program, where he contributed his planning expertise and collaborated closely with the local health department and community partners. His research interest includes investigating the complex relationship between the built environment and health through a social equity lens. Josh Sharfstein†* @drJoshS Joshua M. Sharfstein, M.D., is vice dean for Public Health Practice and Community Engagement and professor of the Practice in Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He is also the director of the Bloomberg American Health Initiative. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C 73 His book, the Public Health Crisis Survival Guide: Leadership and Management in Trying Times, was published by Oxford University Press. Previously, Dr. Sharfstein served as secretary of the Maryland department of health and mental hygiene from January 2011 to December 2014. In this position, he led efforts to align Maryland’s health care system with improved health outcomes, culminating in the adoption of a revised payment model for all hospital care for Maryland residents. He also oversaw the development of a statewide health improvement process with 18 local public–private coalitions and the reshaping of the state’s approach to health information exchange, long-term care, and behavioral health. From March 2009 to January 2011, Dr. Sharfstein was principal deputy commissioner of FDA, where he oversaw the agency’s successful performance management and transparency initiatives. From December 2005 to March 2009, as commissioner of health for Baltimore City, Dr. Sharfstein led innovative efforts that contributed to major declines in both overdose deaths and infant mortality rates. From July 2001 to December 2005, as minority professional staff and health policy advisor for Congressman Henry A. Waxman, Dr. Sharfstein was engaged in a wide range of oversight and legislative activities on health care topics, including emergency preparedness, HIV, and the politicization of science. Dr. Sharfstein graduated summa cum laude with an A.B. in Social Studies from Harvard College in 1991. From August 1991 to August 1992, he worked on public health projects in Guatemala and Costa Rica with a Frederick Sheldon Prize Fellowship. He graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1996, from the Boston Combined Residency Program in Pediatrics at Boston Medical Center and Children’s Hospital in 1999, and from the fellowship in general academic pediatrics at the Boston University School of Medicine in 2001. Dr. Sharfstein is an elected fellow of IOM (2014) and the National Academy of Public Administration (2013). He serves on the Board of Population Health and Public Health Practice of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine’s Health and Medicine Division and the editorial board of Journal of the American Medical Association. His awards have included the Jay S. Drotman Memorial Award from the APHA (1994), Public Official of the Year from Governing Magazine (2008), and the Circle of Commendation Award from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (2013). Brian Smedley @BrianDSmedley Brian D. Smedley is cofounder and executive director of the National Collaborative for Health Equity, a project that connects research, policy analysis, and communications with on-the-ground activism to advance health equity. In this role, Dr. Smedley oversees several initiatives designed to improve opportunities for good health for people of color and undo the health consequences of racism. From 2008 to 2014, Dr. Smedley was VP and director of the Health Policy Institute of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, DC, a research and policy organization focused on addressing the needs of communities of color. Michelle Spencer Michelle Spencer is the associate director of the Bloomberg American Health Initiative and an associate scientist within the department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She has more than 20 years of experience in public health management and leadership and a wealth of experience in administrative and operational management, strategic planning, resource management, and policy development. She previously served as the director of the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration at the Maryland department of health and mental hygiene and director of the Maryland Health Enterprise Zone PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

74 WORKFORCE FOR POPULATION HEALTH IMPROVEMENT initiative. She oversaw the department’s core public health programs, which included maternal and child health, infectious disease epidemiology and outbreak response, infectious disease prevention and health services, environmental health, and primary care and community health. Ms. Spencer focuses on addressing the preventable nature of public health issues through integrated, evidence-based approaches, with an emphasis on reducing disparities and advancing health equity. She was the chief of staff of the Baltimore health department from 2004–2012. Noelle Wiggins Noelle Wiggins is the senior research and evaluation consultant for ORCHWA and a consultant in private practice. She has had the pleasure and honor of working with CHWs and promotores/promotoras for more than 30 years. She began her work with CHWs in a rural area of El Salvador, where she lived from 1986 to 1990. From 1990 to 1995, Dr. Wiggins directed La Familia Sana (“The Healthy Family”), a CHW program in the migrant and seasonal working community in Hood River, OR. She served as associate director of the landmark 1998 National Community Health Advisor Study and lead author on the chapter on the roles and competencies of CHWs. Dr. Wiggins founded the Community Capacitation Center at the Multnomah County health department in Portland, OR, and directed that program for 18 years. She is a cofounder of ORCHWA and a past president of the Oregon Public Health Association. She has published multiple peer-reviewed articles and presented at many conferences. She is passionate about using popular/people’s education for CHW training, preparing CHWs to play a wide range of roles, supporting professional development for CHWs, and engaging CHWs in community-based participatory research and evaluation. Thanks to financial aid, Dr. Wiggins earned a B.A. in History with honors from Yale, a master of science from the Harvard School of Public Health, and an Ed.D. from Portland State University. Katie Wunderlich Katie Wunderlich began her tenure as executive director of the Health Services Cost Review Commission (HSCRC) in September 2018, where she led the commission through the transition from the hospital-based all-payer model to the total cost of care model, which focuses on hospital and nonhospital system transformation that enhances patient care, improves health, and lowers costs. Previously, Ms. Wunderlich was the principal deputy director at HSCRC, overseeing the Center for Provider Alignment and Engagement, which works with hospitals, physicians, and other health care providers in partnership with patients to achieve the goals of the new model and transform health care delivery. She also directs legislative advocacy efforts for HSCRC for issues before the Maryland General Assembly and with Maryland’s Congressional delegation. Before joining the HSCRC in 2016, Ms. Wunderlich was a deputy legislative officer in governor Hogan’s legislative office. She also served as director of government relations for the Maryland Hospital Association and budget analyst for the General Assembly’s Legislative Services department. She holds a master of public policy from GWU. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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Dialogue About the Workforce for Population Health Improvement: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
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On March 21, 2019, the Roundtable on Population Health Improvement of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a 1-day workshop to explore the broad and multidisciplinary nature of the population health workforce. Workshop participants explored methods for facilitating a population health orientation/perspective among public health and health care leaders and professionals; framing the work of personnel such as community health workers (CHWs), health navigators, and peer-to-peer chronic disease management educators within the context of population health; and leveraging the competencies of public and private sector workforces, such as education, transportation, and planning, that are working to include a “health in all policies,” community livability, or well-being orientation in their activities. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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