National Academies Press: OpenBook
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25549.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25549.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25549.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25549.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25549.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25549.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25549.
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Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25549.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25549.
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Page R9
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25549.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Prepublication Copy—Subject To Further Editorial Correction Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion PROCEEDINGS OF A WORKSHOP Anne Frances Johnson, Rapporteur Condensed Matter and Materials Research Committee Board on Physics and Astronomy Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences National Academy of Engineering PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001 This study was supported by Contract No. DMR-1830008 with the U.S. Department of Energy and DC- SC0019247 with the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of any organization or agency that provided support for the project. International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-XXXXX-X International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-XXXXX-X Digital Object Identifier: https://doi.org/10.17226/25549 Cover: xxx xxxxx xxx xx xxxx xx x xxxxxx Graphic Artist: xxxxxxx This publication is available in limited quantities from Board on Physics and Astronomy 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001 bpa@nas.edu https://sites.nationalacademies.org/bpa Additional copies of this publication are available for sale from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, NW, Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313; http://www.nap.edu. Copyright 2019 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America Suggested citation: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/25549. PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION

The National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, nongovernmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia McNutt is president. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to bring the practices of engineering to advising the nation. Members are elected by their peers for extraordinary contributions to engineering. Dr. John L. Anderson, is president. The National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) was established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues. Members are elected by their peers for distinguished contributions to medicine and health. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president. The three Academies work together as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. The National Academies also encourage education and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding in matters of science, engineering, and medicine. Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at www.nationalacademies.org. PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION

Consensus Study Reports published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine document the evidence-based consensus on the study’s statement of task by an authoring committee of experts. Reports typically include findings, conclusions, and recommendations based on information gathered by the committee and the committee’s deliberations. Each report has been subjected to a rigorous and independent peer-review process and it represents the position of the National Academies on the statement of task. Proceedings published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine chronicle the presentations and discussions at a workshop, symposium, or other event convened by the National Academies. The statements and opinions contained in proceedings are those of the participants and are not endorsed by other participants, the planning committee, or the National Academies. For information about other products and activities of the National Academies, please visit www.nationalacademies.org/about/whatwedo. PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION

CONDENSED MATTER AND MATERIALS RESEARCH COMMITTEE PIERRE WILTZIUS, University of California, Santa Barbara, Chair SUSAN COPPERSMITH, NAS,1 University of Wisconsin at Madison, Vice Chair CHARLES AHN, Yale University KARIN DAHMEN, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign THOMAS EPPS, University of Delaware GIULIA GALLI, University of Chicago OLIVIA A. GRAEVE, University of California, San Diego AHARON KAPITULNIK, NAS, Stanford University ANTHONY KU, National Institute of Clean and Low-Carbon Energy PETER LITTLEWOOD, Argonne National Laboratory TOM LUBENSKY, NAS, University of Pennsylvania DAVID MANDRUS, University of Tennessee at Knoxville LESLIE MOMODA, HRL Laboratories KAREN WINEY, University of Pennsylvania TOM WITTEN, University of Chicago Staff CHRISTOPHER JONES, Program Officer JAMES LANCASTER, Board Director NEERAJ P. GORKHALY, Associate Program Officer AMISHA JINANDRA, Research Associate LINDA WALKER, Program Coordinator 1 Member, National Academy of Sciences. PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION v

BOARD ON PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY ABRAHAM LOEB, Harvard University, Chair ANDREW LANKFORD, University of California, Irvine, Vice Chair WILLIAM BIALEK, NAS,2 Princeton University JILL DAHLBURG, Naval Research Laboratory LOUIS DIMAURO, Ohio State University FRANCIS DISALVO, Cornell University WENDY FREEDMAN, NAS, University of Chicago TIM HECKMAN, NAS, Johns Hopkins University WENDELL HILL III, University of Maryland ALAN HURD, Los Alamos National Laboratory NERGIS MAVALVALA, NAS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology LYMAN PAGE, JR., NAS, Princeton University STEVEN RITZ, University of California, Santa Cruz SUNIL SINHA, University of California, San Diego WILLIAM A. ZAJC, Columbia University Staff JAMES LANCASTER, Director GREGORY MACK, Senior Program Officer CHRISTOPHER JONES, Program Officer NEERAJ P. GORKHALY, Associate Program Officer AMISHA JINANDRA, Research Associate LINDA WALKER, Program Coordinator BETH DOLAN, Financial Associate 2 Member, National Academy of Sciences. PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION vi

Acknowledgment of Reviewer This Proceedings of a Workshop was reviewed in-house as part of a pilot test aimed at simplifying the review process for certain low-risk workshop reports. This Workshop Proceedings was read in draft form by Scott T. Weidman, Deputy Executive Director for Science and Engineering Programs, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences within the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine to ensure the Proceedings meets institutional standards for quality and objectivity while accurately reflecting the purpose and focus of the workshop. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments to help ensure that the published proceedings is as sound as possible and that it meets the institutional standards for quality, objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the process. Responsibility for the final content rests entirely with the rapporteur and the National Academies. PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION vii

Contents INTRODUCTION 1 WORKSHOP PLENARIES 2 Thermal Transport and Quasi-Particle Hydrodynamics, 2 Thermal Transport Beyond the Quasiparticle Paradigm, 5 Thermal Hall Effect from Neutral Spin Excitations in Frustrated Quantum Magnets, 9 Quantization of the Thermal Hall Conductivity at Small Hall Angles, 13 Thermal Spin Transport: Spin-Seebeck and Magnon Drag Effects, 16 SYNTHESIS AND DISCUSSION 21 Frontiers in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion, 21 Key Problems and Next Steps, 23 Additional Considerations, 24 APPENDIXES A Workshop Agenda 27 B Workshop Participants 28 C Speaker and Planning Committee Biographies 30 PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION ix

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Thermal transport and energy conversion has remained an active field for at least 200 years, with numerous opportunities for discoveries and new applications. Recently, experiments have advanced researchers’ understanding of basic physics, and how new discoveries might translate into applications in energy, materials, quantum technologies, and other areas.

The National Academies convened a workshop on April 11, 2019 to identify and assess the frontier of current research in the field of thermal transport and energy conversion. Discussions involved topics related to thermal transport and quasi-particle hydrodynamics, thermal transport beyond the quasiparticle paradigm, the thermal hall effect from neutral spin excitations in frustrated quantum magnets, quantization of the thermal hall conductivity at small hall angles, and thermal spin transport, including spin-seebeck and magnon drag effects. These topics were strategically selected with the goal of uncovering key challenges, opportunities, and issues in order to guide future efforts and investments to advance the field. This publication offers a condensed summary of the discussions and presentations from the workshop, which was unclassified and open to the public.

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