National Academies Press: OpenBook

A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies (2019)

Chapter: Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management

« Previous: Section 1: Introduction
Page 13
Suggested Citation:"Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 13
Page 14
Suggested Citation:"Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 14
Page 15
Suggested Citation:"Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 15
Page 16
Suggested Citation:"Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 16
Page 17
Suggested Citation:"Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 17
Page 18
Suggested Citation:"Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 18
Page 19
Suggested Citation:"Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 19
Page 20
Suggested Citation:"Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 20
Page 21
Suggested Citation:"Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 21
Page 22
Suggested Citation:"Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 22
Page 23
Suggested Citation:"Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 23

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

13  Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management What is Emergency Management  The  discipline  known  today  as  Emergency Management  has  evolved  over  time.    FEMA  Course  IS‐0230.d:  Fundamentals  of  Emergency Management  adopts  the  International  Association  of  Emergency Managers  (IAEM) definition for emergency management: “The managerial function charged with creating the framework  within which communities reduce vulnerability to threats/hazards and cope with disasters.”   Emergency  management  has  been  contextualized  in  many  forms.    Frequently  Emergency  or  Disaster  Preparedness and Emergency Management have been considered to be interchangeable terms; however, in  the strictest sense “preparedness” describes a process designed to ensure that the response to an incident or  emergency  is  effectively  coordinated.    FEMA  defines  Preparedness  as  "a  continuous  cycle  of  planning,  organizing,  training,  equipping,  exercising,  evaluating,  and  taking  corrective  action  in  an  effort  to  ensure  effective  coordination during  incident  response."    In  contrast, Emergency Management  is a programmatic  activity that encompasses a comprehensive approach to building and sustaining capabilities focused towards  a pre‐designated set of risk‐based EM categories – “prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover  from”, threats and hazards.    In  the  transportation  industry, maintaining  an  effective  emergency management  function  is  both  a  daily  business  requirement  and  a  strategic  enterprise‐wide  risk  management  responsibility.      Emergency  management  is needed  in all modes of  transportation – highway,  rail, public  transit, pipeline, aviation and  maritime.    Typically,  the  robustness  of  a  transportation  agency’s  emergency  management  program  is  determined by the  interrelatedness of the established framework, both to other modes, as well as to other  interdependent functions that comprise the whole of community services – such as public health, public works,  and communications.    Emergency  Management  has  also  been  impacted  by  its  interface  with  security.  Terms  such  as  critical  infrastructure protection, threats vs. hazards, “all‐hazards”, and now “resilience” have transcended the field  of  emergency  preparedness  and  the  discipline  of  emergency  management,  creating  differing  sets  of  accountabilities for various kinds of incidents or emergencies.    Maintaining the focus on the full set of emergency management categories – prevent, protect against, mitigate,  respond  to,  and  recover  from,  –  resolves  the  process‐oriented  confusion  over  these  terms.    Emergency  management’s  programmatic  approach  addresses  the  outcomes,  impacts  or  consequences  of  events,  therefore it is irrelevant whether the incident or emergency was caused by the intentional act of an individual  (threat based) or by an act of nature or by an accident (hazard based).   Similarly, both an all‐hazards and a  resilient approach to emergency management is accomplished by managing across the full set of emergency  management categories.     

14  Emergency Management Principles  The FEMA Emergency Management Institute’s Higher Education Project working group identified the following  eight principles:   1. Comprehensive – Emergency managers consider and take  into account all threats/hazards, all phases, all stakeholders, and all impacts relevant to disasters. 2. Progressive  –  Emergency  managers  anticipate  future  disasters  and  take  protective, preventive,  and  preparatory  measures  to  build  disaster‐resistant  and  disaster‐resilient communities. 3. Risk‐Driven  –  Emergency managers use  sound  risk management principles  (threat/hazard identification, risk analysis, and impact analysis) in assigning priorities and resources. 4. Integrated – Emergency managers ensure unity of effort among all levels of government and all elements of a community. 5. Collaborative  –  Emergency managers  create  and  sustain  broad  and  sincere  relationships among individuals and organizations to encourage trust, advocate a team atmosphere, build consensus, and facilitate communication. 6. Coordinated – Emergency managers synchronize the activities of all relevant stakeholders to achieve a common purpose. 7. Flexible – Emergency managers use creative and  innovative approaches  in solving disaster challenges. 8. Professional – Emergency managers value a science‐ and knowledge‐based approach based on  education,  training,  experience,  ethical  practice,  public  stewardship,  and  continuous improvement. Types of Incidents and Events  An emergency may consist of a short duration, simple, static and singular incident; or it may be prolonged,  complex,  and  dynamic,  impacting multiple  fronts  and  requiring  deployment  of  extensive  assets  and  resources.  An incident is an occurrence, regardless of cause, that requires response actions to prevent or  minimize loss of life, or damage to property and/or the environment. A traffic incident is an emergency  road user occurrence, a natural disaster, or other unplanned event that affects or  impedes the normal  flow of traffic.   The term “all hazards” includes a broad range of incidents and events that have the potential to impact  transportation  systems.  Table  1  provides  an  overview  of  various  incidents  ranging  from  minor  to  catastrophic and planned events. The more  severe  categories of  incidents are  those more  commonly  associated with emergencies. 

15  Table 1: Types of Incidents with Characteristics 

16  As the degree of complexity of an incident increases, so does the coordination required for the typical  response. Figure 1 illustrates typical patterns of response for different scales of incidents.   Emergency Management Authorities   Federal and State Emergency Management Requirements The federal government requires State DOTs to incorporate principles and concepts of national initiatives that  provide  common  approaches  to  incident  management  and  response  in  emergency  response  plans  and  operations. New federal guidance  issued since 2010 has resulted  in a need to re‐examine requirements for  state transportation agency planning and response functions, role and responsibilities.   For example, the Fixing  America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, enacted in 2015, amends Section 5303 of the United States Code  to include the word “resilient” in the guidance for Metropolitan and Statewide Transportation Planning.  Also, because other  local, state and federal agencies may be  involved along with a transportation agency  in  emergency  response,  there  is a need  to  review and understand  the specific  requirements, procedures and  protocols that have been established for managing emergencies and coordinating between different roles and  responsibilities  amongst  different  agencies,  including  the  coordination  role  of  Metropolitan  Planning  Organizations (MPOs). As an example, the FAST Act encourages MPOs to consult with State agencies that plan  Figure 1: Agency Involvement by Incident Level for State Transportation Agencies (STAs) and agencies. Source: NCHRP  525 Vol. 6, Security Guide for Emergency Transportation Operations 

17      for natural disaster risk reduction to produce plans that include strategies to reduce the vulnerability to natural  events.    At the federal level, public laws are the governing authorities for other directives, policies, and guidance. Figure  2 illustrates this relationship.        Figure 2: National Emergency Management Policies and Guidelines     

18  Public Laws Governing Emergency Management  The key federal laws implementing Emergency Management policy are:  Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5122)1  The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Public Law 100‐707) created the system  in place today by which a Presidential disaster declaration triggers financial and physical assistance through  FEMA. The Stafford Act:   Covers all hazards, including natural disasters and terrorist events.  Provides primary authority for the Federal Government to respond to disasters and emergencies.  Gives FEMA responsibility for coordinating Government response efforts. The President’s authority is delegated to FEMA through separate mechanisms.  Describes  the  programs  and  processes  by  which  the  Federal  Government  provides  disaster  and emergency  assistance  to  State  and  local  governments,  tribal  nations,  eligible  private  nonprofit organizations, and individuals affected by a declared major disaster or emergency. Under the Stafford Act, the President can designate an incident as an “Emergency” or “Major Disaster”  The President may declare an “emergency” unilaterally, but may only declare a “major disaster” at the request  of a Governor or tribal Chief Executive who certifies that the State or tribal government and affected  local  governments are overwhelmed.      The  Federal  assistance  available  for  emergencies  is more  limited  than  that which  is  available  for  a major  disaster.  Emergencies are “Any natural catastrophe (including any hurricane, tornado, storm, high water, wind‐ driven water, tidal wave, tsunami, earthquake, volcanic eruption, landslide, mudslide, snowstorm, or drought),  or, regardless of cause, any fire, flood, or explosion, in any part of the United States, which in the determination  of the President causes damage of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant major disaster assistance to  supplement the efforts and available resources of States, tribal governments, local governments, and disaster  relief organizations in alleviating the damage, loss, hardship, or suffering”.  Major disasters may be caused by such natural events as floods, hurricanes, and earthquakes. Disasters may  include  fires,  floods, or explosions  that  the President  feels are of  sufficient magnitude  to warrant  Federal  assistance.   Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) (PL‐104‐321, 1996) 2  EMAC  is a national  interstate mutual aid agreement that enables states to share resources during times of  disaster. Since the 104th Congress ratified the compact, EMAC has grown to become the nation's system for  providing  mutual  aid  through  operational  procedures  and  protocols  that  have  been  validated  through  experience.  EMAC  is  administered  by  NEMA,  the  National  Emergency  Management  Association,  headquartered in Lexington, KY.   EMAC acts as a complement to the federal disaster response system, providing timely and cost‐effective relief  to states requesting assistance from assisting member states who understand the needs of jurisdictions that  1 Information obtained and adapted from FEMA Course IS‐0230.d: Fundamentals of Emergency Management.   Contains quotations.  2 Information obtained at https://www.fema.gov/pdf/emergency/nrf/EMACoverviewForNRF.pdf.  Contains  quotations.  

19      are struggling to preserve life, the economy, and the environment.  EMAC can be used either in lieu of federal  assistance or  in conjunction with federal assistance, thus providing a "seamless" flow of needed goods and  services to an impacted state.  EMAC further provides another venue for mitigating resource deficiencies by  ensuring maximum use of all available resources within member states' inventories.       The thirteen (13) articles of the Compact sets the foundation for sharing resources from state to state that has  been adopted by all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico.  Post‐Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006 (PKEMRA)3  Hurricane Katrina in August 2005 was the most devastating natural disaster in U.S. history. Gaps that became  apparent in the response to that disaster led to the Post‐Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006  (PKEMRA). PKEMRA significantly reorganized FEMA, provided it substantial new authority to remedy gaps in  response, and included a more robust preparedness mission for FEMA. This act:   Establishes  a  Disability  Coordinator  and  develops  guidelines  to  accommodate  individuals  with  disabilities.   Establishes the National Emergency Family Registry and Locator System to reunify separated family  members.   Coordinates and supports precautionary evacuations and recovery efforts.   Provides  transportation  assistance  for  relocating  and  returning  individuals  displaced  from  their  residences in a major disaster.   Provides  case management  assistance  to  identify  and  address unmet needs of  survivors of major  disasters.  Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013 (P.L. 113‐2)4    The Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013 (P.L. 113‐2) authorizes several significant changes to the way  FEMA may deliver disaster assistance under a variety of programs. Key changes relate to the following:   Authorizing alternative procedures for the Public Assistance (PA) Program.   Reviewing and evaluating the Public Assistance small project threshold.   Establishing a nationwide dispute resolution pilot program for Public Assistance projects.   Streamlining the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP).   Developing a national strategy to reduce costs from future disasters   Revising the factors considered when evaluating the need for the Individual Assistance Program in a  major disaster or emergency.   Authorizing the lease and repair of rental units for use as direct temporary housing.   Establishing a unified and expedited interagency environmental and historic preservation process for  disaster recovery projects.   Authorizing  changes  in  the  way  certain  government  employees  are  reimbursed  for  performing  emergency protective measures.   Amending the Stafford Act to allow the Chief Executive of a federally recognized Indian tribe to make  a direct request to the President for a major disaster or emergency declaration. Tribes may elect to  receive assistance under a State’s declaration, provided that the President does not make a declaration  for the tribe for the same incident.                                                               3 Information obtained and adapted from FEMA Course IS‐0230.d: Fundamentals of Emergency Management.   Contains quotations.  4 Information obtained and adapted from FEMA Course IS‐0230.d: Fundamentals of Emergency Management.   Contains quotations. 

20        The Act also:   Authorizes the President to establish criteria to adjust the non‐federal cost share for an Indian tribal  government consistent to the extent allowed by current authorities.   Requires  FEMA  to  consider  the  unique  circumstances  of  tribes  when  it  develops  regulations  to  implement the provision.   Amends  the  Stafford  Act  to  include  federally  recognized  Indian  tribal  governments  in  numerous  references to State and local governments within the Stafford Act.    Other  key  transportation  industry  federal  laws  that  impact  emergency  management  requirements  include:  1. The Fixing America’s Surface Transportation  (FAST) Act, the current transportation reauthorization  legislation, which  expands  the  focus  on  the  resiliency  of  the  transportation  system.  “It  is  in  the  national  interest  to  encourage  and  promote  the  safe  and  efficient management,  operation,  and  development of resilient surface transportation systems that will serve the mobility needs of people  and freight and foster economic growth and development within and between States and urbanized  areas through metropolitan and statewide transportation planning processes.” It requires strategies  to reduce the vulnerability of existing transportation infrastructure to natural disasters and expands  the scope of consideration of the metropolitan planning process to include improving transportation  system resiliency and reliability.    2. The Moving  Ahead  for  Progress  in  the  21st  Century  Act  (MAP–21),  the  previous  transportation  reauthorization legislation, which focused on performance management and established a series of  national performance goals. The goals related to safety, congestion reduction, freight movement and  economic  vitality  and  environmental  sustainability  are  of  particular  relevance  to  emergency  management. MAP‐21 also  required  incorporating performance goals, measures, and  targets  into  transportation planning.      Presidential Directives  The Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPDs), Presidential Policy Directives (PPDs) and Executive  Orders are directive  in nature and must be  implemented  in other formats, generally policy documents  and/or guidelines. The requirements of these directives and implementing mechanisms are voluntary to  state, territorial, tribal, and local governments (but note that typically the entity must comply to qualify  for federal disaster relief compensation). Indeed, the HSPDs provide specific schedules for  incremental  compliance. The relevant presidential directives are as follows:    1. HSPD‐5, Management of Domestic Incidents—created the National Incident Management System and  the National Response Plan (the latter was later replaced by the National Response Framework), as  shown in Figure 2.  2. HSPD‐7, Infrastructure Identification, Prioritization, and Protection—led to the National Infrastructure  Protection Plan (NIPP).  3. HSPD‐8,  National  Preparedness—led  to  creation  of  a  National  Preparedness  Goal,  which  was  implemented in the form of the National Preparedness Guidelines (NPG) document and several other  guidelines.  PPD‐8  links  together  national  preparedness  efforts  using  the  following  key  elements:  

21      National Preparedness Goal, National Preparedness System, Whole Community Initiative and Annual  National Preparedness Report.  4. PPD‐21,  Critical  Infrastructure  Security  and  Resilience—focuses  on  the  need  for  secure  critical  infrastructure that can withstand and rapidly recover (resilient) from all hazards.   5. Executive  Order  13636:  Improving  Critical  Infrastructure  Cybersecurity—provides  a  technology‐ neutral cybersecurity framework and means to promote the adoption of cybersecurity practices.  6. Executive Order 13653, Preparing the United States For The Impacts Of Climate Change—  requires  federal agencies to integrate considerations of the challenges posed by climate change effects into  their programs, policies, rules and operations to ensure they continue to be effective, even as the  climate changes.  National Emergency Management Policies and Guidelines    National Incident Management System (NIMS)  NIMS created a national standard system for federal, state, tribal, and local governments to work together  to prepare for, and respond to, incidents affecting lives and property. It presents and integrates accepted  practices  proven  effective  over  the  years  into  a  comprehensive  framework  for  use  by  incident  management organizations in an all‐hazards context. (NIMS, 2008).  The following two NIMS companion  documents are tailored to transportation professionals:   FHWA’s Simplified Guide to the Incident Command System for Transportation Professionals  (FHWA, 2006a) introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) to stakeholders who could be  called upon to provide specific expertise, assistance, or material during highway incidents, but  who may be largely unfamiliar with ICS organization and operations.   I‐95 Corridor Coalition’s Supplemental Resource Guide to the National Incident Management  System (NIMS) for Transportation Management Center Professionals. (I‐95CC, 2008)    National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP)  National Infrastructure Protection Plan 2013 Partnering for Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience  emphasizes  the  importance  of  resilience,  the  need  to  reduce  all‐hazards  vulnerabilities  and mitigate  potential  consequences  of  incidents  or  events  that  do  occur.  The  NIPP  2013  has  six  chapters,  two  appendices, and four supplements. After an Executive Summary, the  Introduction (Chapter 1) gives an  overview of the NIPP 2013 and its evolution from the 2009 NIPP. Chapter 2 defines the Vision, Mission,  and Goals of the NIPP 2013, while Chapter 3 describes the Critical Infrastructure Environment in terms of  key concepts, risk, policy, operations, and partnership. Core Tenets are established in Chapter 4. Ways to  collaborate to manage risk are given in Chapter 5. The final chapter is a Call to Action (“Steps to Advance  the National Effort”). The Sector‐Specific Plans of the 16 critical infrastructure sectors are being updated  to align with the NIPP 2013. The web page for NIPP 2013 also contains links to training courses, critical  infrastructure partnership courses, security awareness courses, and  the  relevant authorities  (i.e.  laws,  regulations, and guidance).    National Preparedness Framework  The National Preparedness Goal (2015) is a “A secure and resilient nation with the capabilities required  across  the whole  community  to prevent, protect against, mitigate,  respond  to, and  recover  from  the  threats and hazards  that pose  the greatest  risk.”   The  following  changes were made  to  the National  Preparedness Goal document:   Language added to stress the importance of community preparedness and resilience. 

22   The Risk  and  the Core Capabilities were enhanced  to  include  items on  cybersecurity  and climate change.  A new core capability, Fire Management and Suppression, was added.  Core capability titles were revised:  Threats  and  Hazard  Identification  (Mitigation)  –  revised  to  Threats  and  Hazards Identification;  Public and Private Services and Resources (Response) – revised to Logistics and Supply Chain Management;  On‐scene  Security  and  Protection  (Response)  –  revised  to  On‐scene  Security, Protection, and Law Enforcement;  Public Health and Medical Services (Response) – revised to Public Health, Healthcare, and Emergency Medical Services. National Preparedness Guidelines (NPG) implement the National Preparedness Goal called out in HSPD‐ 8,  National  Preparedness  (NPG,  2007).  It  introduces  a  number  of  capabilities  based  planning  tools,  including:   National Planning Scenarios are a diverse set of 15 high‐consequence  threat scenarios  for potential terrorist attacks and natural disasters that form the basis for coordinated federal planning, training, exercises, and grant investments needed to prepare for emergencies of all types.  The  scenarios  include  12  chemical,  biological,  radiation,  nuclear,  and  explosive weapons (CBRNE) threats; a cyber‐attack; a Category 5 hurricane; and an earthquake.  Target Capabilities  List  (TCL) defines 37  specific  capabilities  that  communities,  the private sector, nongovernment agencies, and all levels of government should collectively possess in order to respond effectively to disasters.  Universal Task List (UTL) is a series of 1,600 unique tasks that can facilitate efforts to prevent, protect  against,  respond  to,  and  recover  from  the  events  represented  by  the  National Planning Scenarios.  It presents a common vocabulary and  identifies key tasks that support development of essential capabilities among organizations at all levels. No entity will perform every task. The National Response Framework (NRF) replaced the earlier National Response Plan and was expanded  in scope, audience, and breadth (NRF, 2008). The NRF is the definitive guide for Emergency Response and  delineates the nation’s response doctrines, responsibilities, and structures. It embraces NIMS and updates  the Emergency Support Function (ESF) descriptions. There are several important companion documents  to the NRF:   ESF Annexes define the stakeholders and their roles and responsibilities, purpose, capabilities, and concept of operations for the 15 ESFs. These are critical to effective ER planning; state/local versions adapted to state and local conditions are typically included in EOPs.  Support  Annexes  are  a  separate  set  of  annexes  that  describe  how  federal  departments  and agencies; state, territorial, tribal, and  local entities; the private sector; volunteer organizations; and  nongovernmental  organizations  (NGOs)  coordinate  and  execute  the  common  functional processes and administrative requirements for efficient and effective incident management. They may support several ESFs.  Incident Annexes are a separate set of annexes that describe the concept of operations to address specific  contingency  or  hazard  situations  or  an  element  of  an  incident  requiring  specialized application of the Framework.

23  The National Disaster Recovery  Framework describes  “how  the whole  community works  together  to  restore, redevelop, and revitalize the health, social, economic, natural, and environmental fabric of the  community.” The new Framework  incorporates  the edits  to  the National Preparedness Goal and new  lessons learned. Additional changes made to the Framework include:   “Increased focus on Recovery’s relationship with the other four mission areas.  Updated  Recovery  Support  Functions  (RSFs)  to  reflect  changes  in  Primary  Agencies  and Supporting Organizations.  Additional language on science and technology capabilities and investments for the rebuilding and recovery efforts.” The  National Mitigation  Framework  covers  the  capabilities  necessary  to  reduce  the  loss  of  life  and  property  by  lessening  the  effects  of  disasters,  and  focuses  on  risk  (understanding  and  reducing  it),  resilience  (helping  communities  recover  quickly  and  effectively  after  disasters),  and  a  culture  of  preparedness. The new Framework  incorporates the edits to the National Preparedness Goal and new  lessons  learned  including a  revised core capability  title, Threats and Hazards  Identification. Additional  language was added on science and technology efforts to reduce risk and analyze vulnerabilities within  the  mitigation  mission  area.  There  were  updates  on  the  Mitigation  Framework  Leadership  Group  (MitFLG), which  is  now  operational,  and  to  the  Community  Resilience  core  capability  definition  “to  promote preparedness activities among individuals, households and families.”  The National  Protection  Framework  focuses  on  “actions  to  deter  threats,  reduce  vulnerabilities,  and  minimize the consequences associated with an incident.” The new Framework incorporates the edits to  the National Preparedness Goal and new lessons learned. In addition, the following changes have been  made:   Updated  Cybersecurity  Core  Capability  Critical  Tasks  to  align with  the Mitigation,  Response,  and Recovery Mission Areas.  Additional  language  on  science  and  technology  investments  to  protect  against  emerging vulnerabilities is included within the protection mission area.  Additional  language on  interagency coordination was added within the protection mission area to support the decision‐making processes outlined within the framework. The National Prevention Framework  focuses on  terrorism and addresses  the capabilities necessary  to  avoid, prevent, or stop imminent threats or attacks. Some core capabilities overlap with the Protection  mission area. The updates include edits to the Nation Preparedness Goal, and lessons learned. Other edits  include:   Updates  to  Coordinating  Structure  language  on  Joint  Operations  Centers  and  the  Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative.  Clarification  on  the  relationship  and  differences  between  the  Prevention  and  Protection mission areas.  Updated language on the National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) as part of the Public Information and Warning core capability.  Additional language on science and technology investments within the prevention mission area.

Next: Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats »
A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

State transportation agencies will always fulfill a role in the emergency-management effort - for all incidents, from the routine traffic incident through major emergencies to catastrophic events. State agency plans and procedures are expected (indeed required if the agency seeks federal compensation) to be related to state and regional emergency structures and plans. This involves multi-agency, multi‐jurisdictional cooperation in emergency planning and operations.

This pre-publication draft, NCHRP Research Report 931: A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies, is an update to a 2010 guide that provided an approach to all‐hazards emergency management and documented existing practices in emergency-response planning.

Significant advances in emergency management, changing operational roles at State DOTs and other transportation organizations, along with federal guidance issued since 2010, have resulted in a need to reexamine requirements for state transportation agency emergency-management functions, roles, and responsibilities.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!