National Academies Press: OpenBook

A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies (2019)

Chapter: Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats

« Previous: Section 2: Institutional Context for Emergency Management
Page 24
Suggested Citation:"Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 24
Page 25
Suggested Citation:"Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 25
Page 26
Suggested Citation:"Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 26
Page 27
Suggested Citation:"Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 27
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 28
Page 29
Suggested Citation:"Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 29
Page 30
Suggested Citation:"Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 30
Page 31
Suggested Citation:"Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 31
Page 32
Suggested Citation:"Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 32
Page 33
Suggested Citation:"Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 33
Page 34
Suggested Citation:"Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 34

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

24  Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats  An all‐hazards approach to emergency management includes a broad range of incidents and events that  have potential to impact transportation agencies and/or transportation systems operations. States across  the nation face different types of hazards. Coastal states can be at risk from hurricanes, tsunamis, storm  surge and sea level rise. Wide corridors of the central part of the country are tornado alleys, with a far  higher probability of these storms occurring. Southwestern states experience severe heat, flash floods  and  dust  storms. Mountain  states  experience  landslides  and  avalanches,  and much  of  the  country  experiences snow and ice storms – with different degrees of severity and different levels of preparedness  for such events. All rivers, large and small, are potential flooding disasters. Earthquakes are not restricted  to the west coast.  There are seismic faults in many states that are overdue and there are frequent seismic  events in states such as Oklahoma that did not experience any in the past. States throughout the nation  are prone to forest and grassland wildfires.   Along with natural hazards,  technological hazards  such as  cyber  incidents and  those  related  to aging  infrastructure need to be addressed as part of an all‐hazards approach. Because today’s transportation  systems are integrated cyber and physical systems, there are greater cyber risks than ever, including the  risk of a cyber  incident  impacting not only data, but the control systems and physical  infrastructure of  transportation agencies.  Range of Hazards  The  latest Strategic National Risk Assessment stated that the Nation continues to face a wide range of  threats and hazards including the following:  Natural hazards,  including hurricanes, earthquakes,  tornadoes, droughts, wildfires, winter  storms,  and  floods,  affect  various parts of  the Nation;  climate  change may  increase  the  severity of  their  impacts.  A  virulent  strain  of  pandemic  influenza  or  human  and  animal  infectious  diseases  could  cause  significant loss of life and economic loss.    Technological and accidental hazards, such as transportation system failures, dam failures, chemical  spills or releases, may result in extensive fatalities and severe economic impacts, and may increase  due to aging infrastructure.   Terrorist organizations or affiliates may seek to acquire and use weapons of mass destruction (WMD).  At the same time, conventional terrorist threats such as “lone actors” using explosives and armed  attacks persist.   Cyber‐attacks have the potential to cause cascading impacts with catastrophic consequences and can  threaten the Nation’s security, economy, public safety and health. Also, cybersecurity is an important  core capability and cyber preparedness needs to be integrated into every core capability.   (NPG, 2015) 

25      Typical hazards and threats facing state transportation agencies and others are shown in Table 2.  Table 2: Sample Hazards and Threats List.   Natural Hazards Technological Hazards Human-Caused Hazards Avalanche Drought Earthquake Epidemic Flood Hurricane (tropical cyclone) Landslide or mudslide Tornado Tsunami (or seiche) Volcanic eruption Wildfire or facility fire Winter storm Wind or dust storm Space weather Solar events Airplane crash Bridge collapse CBRNE Dam or levee failure Electromagnetic pulse HAZMAT release Power failure Radiological release Train derailment Urban conflagration Loss of Internet connectivity Loss of telecommunications Equipment failure Civil disturbance School violence Terrorist or criminal act Sabotage War related Adapted from FEMA, Comprehensive Planning Guide 101, 2009; indicates others added by the research team or from other transportation sources. Natural Hazards  Natural hazards span the range of predictability with extreme weather events increasing in frequency  (e.g., Superstorm Sandy, extensive Midwest flooding, powerful hurricanes, extensive wildfires).   Weather events not only disrupt service, but can also damage infrastructure.    Space‐weather  events  are  naturally  occurring  phenomena  in  the  space  environment  that  have  the  potential to disrupt technologies and systems in space and on Earth. These phenomena can affect satellite  and airline operations, communications networks, navigation systems, the electric power grid, and other  technologies and  infrastructures critical to the daily  functioning, economic vitality, and security of our  Nation. Space weather can affect communication and navigation systems  that are critical  for safe and  efficient transportation systems.   For most of the natural hazards, geography is the primary variable in predicting likelihood of events. In  many cases, geographic data on hazard likelihood is readily available and can be used with minimal cost  or difficulty by appropriately skilled and equipped staff. There may be cases, however, where anecdotal  evidence or judgement may need to be relied upon.  The  advanced  age  and  deterioration  of  infrastructure  can multiply  risks  from manmade  or  natural  disasters and make the effects of an event much worse.  Technological Hazards  There are a variety of  technological hazards  that can  impact  transportation systems. Despite  the best  efforts of engineering and maintenance, the potential hazard or threat of a structural failure will always  exist. Structure failure refers to any decrease in the physical integrity of the transportation asset to bear  the weight required to carry passengers or freight. Structural failure may be sudden or gradual. The scope  of this hazard or threat may be minimal, such as a crack in the wall requiring remediation or a pavement 

26      ripple requiring the temporary relocation of traffic.  Integrity  loss may also be catastrophic, resulting  in  total collapse or flooding of a structure, wreaking widespread loss of assets and loss of life.  There  is no known method  to guarantee  that a structure will never  fail or deteriorate. Proper design,  construction, and maintenance may drastically decline the likelihood of a sudden failure; however, unseen  geotechnical or aquatic  forces may go undetected by asset owners.  Inconsistencies and  lapses  in  the  design, construction, and maintenance of an asset may collude  to create  the conditions  for a sudden  structural failure.  Hazardous materials  (HAZMAT) may  be  in  liquid,  solid,  or  gaseous  form.  The  quantity  of material  introduced may be minimal but cause a hazard to users of the transportation system. Hazardous materials  include common industrial cleaners used by transportation workers and canisters of pepper spray set off  by  transit users.  In both  circumstances,  it  is unlikely  that  the maintenance worker or  the  commuter  entered the transportation system with the intent of discharging material into the air. Materials may also  include hazardous liquid, which include debris or waste products moved into the transportation system  by a vehicle, truck, or rail car. All hazardous materials require specialized remediation that will close a  roadway or transit segment to allow processing.  Human Caused Hazards  Vehicle/vessel  collisions  are  a  common  type of human  caused hazards.    For  this hazard,  the  specific  concern  is  the  potential  for  collisions  to  cause  very  hot  fires  that  can  damage  steel  or  timber  infrastructure. The  Federal Motor Carrier  Safety Administration maintains detailed  statistics on  crash  frequencies for large trucks, including tankers and hazardous materials. The frequency of vessel collisions  can be very site specific, depending on the waterway, navigational aids, climate, and maritime traffic.   Terrorists use a wide array of tactics and techniques in conducting an attack including active shooters and  assault by vehicle. Below is a list of the most likely tactics and threats from the terrorists’ perspective:  1. Vehicle borne Improvised Explosive Device (VBIED): These  include both  landborne vehicles (i.e.  truck bombs)  that would be deployed against components  reachable by  land and waterborne  vehicles (i.e. boat bombs) that would be deployed against any components reachable by water.   2. Hand Emplaced  Improvised Explosive Device  (HEIED): These  include  contact explosive devices  such  as  satchel  demolition  charges  and  shaped  charges  that  are  commonly  used  by military  engineers and civilian demolition experts to precisely cut/sever structural member.   3. Non‐Explosive Cutting Device  (NECD):  These  include  any non‐explosive devices  such  as  saws,  grinders, and torches that can be used to cut/sever structural members.   4. Vehicular  Impact  (VI):  Similar  to  the  VBIEDs,  these  include  both  landborne  and waterborne  vehicles depending on the location of the component of concern.   Interdependencies and Cascading Effects   There are extensive interdependencies among transportation modes and other sectors such as power and  water.  For example, the loss of a key bridge or tunnel can disrupt power and communications along with  transportation due to co‐located utilities. The transportation disruption can impactpassenger and freight  movement, as well as disrupting the supply chain.  

27  Cascading events are events  that occur as  result of an  initial event.   For example, wildfires  in  the dry  season can  lead  to mudslides when the rains come  later.   Heavy rains can result in dam overflows or failures.  A flashflood or lightning strike can disrupt power in an area and shout of traffic control systems,  resulting in, a serious traffic accident.  If there was HazMat involved and a spill occurs, an evacuation of  the area may be necessary.   Because  no  entity  has  sufficient  resources  to  protect  against  every  threat  and  every  hazard,  state  transportation agency investment in preparedness activities is necessarily risk‐based. Understanding the  dependencies within and between infrastructure and systems along with potential cascading effects are  developing areas of emergency management.   Hazard Data Sources  Information on potential hazards, including probability and possible effects, can be obtained from the  Federal Emergency Management Association (FEMA), State Emergency Management and Civil Defense  Agencies, National Weather Service (NWS), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of  the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Department of Natural Resources  (DNR). The following sections describe sources of relevant geographically referenced hazard data:  Earthquake.  The  U.S.  Geological  Survey  (USGS)  National  Seismic  Hazard  Maps  (Figure  3)  display  earthquake ground motions  for various probability  levels across  the United States and are applied  in  seismic provisions of building codes, insurance rate structures, risk assessments, and other public policy.  The National Seismic Hazard Maps are derived from seismic hazard curves calculated on a grid of sites  across the United States that describe the annual frequency of exceeding a set of ground motions. Data  and maps from the 2014 U.S. Geological Survey National Seismic Hazard Mapping Project are available.  The USGS Seismic Zone Maps are a probabilistic view (either 2% or 10%) that the ground acceleration will  exceed  the  given  value over 50  years.   Depending on which model  a  state used,  these would  easily  translate into the likelihood a state would use for their model.   Figure 3. USGS National Seismic Hazard Map (USGS 2011)  Maps  for  available  periods  (0.2  s,  1  s,  PGA)  and  specified  annual  frequencies  of  exceedance  can  be  calculated  from  the  hazard  curves.  Figures  depict  probabilistic  ground  motions  with  a  2  percent  probability  of  exceedance.  Spectral  accelerations  are  calculated  for  5  percent  damped  linear  elastic  oscillators. All ground motions are calculated  for site conditions with Vs30=760 m/s, corresponding  to  NEHRP B/C site class boundary. There is also a FEMA HAZUS data set for earthquakes. 

28      Landslide. Some jurisdictions that are especially sensitive to landslides have prepared hazard maps. As an  example, hazard mapping will become statewide in Washington State following a 2015 state law (RCW  43.92.025), which also covers earthquake and tsunami. The law specifies LIDAR mapping and specifically  requires estimation of  likelihood  and  consequence, but does not mandate other parameters  such  as  return period, leaving such decisions to the State Geologist.  Agencies that have slope inventories may be able to compute the total centerline length of road affected  by unstable slopes. The polling method, describes a way  that can be used  to generate a  frequency of  landslide incidents. These would be gathered for all roads, and not just bridges. If the total length of slope  incidents is divided by the inventory length of slopes and the number of years covered by the poll, this  will provide an estimate of landslide probability per foot of road. For a given bridge, multiply this by the  total roadway length (on and under the bridge) to give a site‐specific extreme event probability.  Agencies that experience debris flows from unstable slopes or freeze/thaw in deteriorating permafrost  may identify extreme events associated with these phenomena that would be assessed in the same way  as landslides.  Storm surge. Florida DOT conducted an analysis of hurricane risk using a FEMA HAZUS data set of high  wind speed (Sobanjo and Thompson 2013). In a GIS this was associated with low elevations and coastal  exposure to give an indication of storm surge vulnerability. Sheppard and Miller (2003) developed design  storm surge hydrographs for the Florida coast (Figure 4). This report listed recommended values for peak  storm  surge  heights  and  corresponding  likelihoods  (50  year,  100  year,  and  500  years occurrence)  at  various locations.     Figure 4. Storm surge contours in Louisiana  (Padgett et al 2008)  The National Climate Assessment (2014) available online has regional forecasts with downloadable sea  level  rise maps. NCHRP Report 750 Vol 2 Climate Change, Extreme Weather Events, and  the Highway  System (2014) included sea level rise estimates by state. NOAA provides sea level rise and coastal flooding  impacts data online along with a Sea Level Rise Viewer at the DigitalCoast website.   High wind. FEMA's HAZUS data set can provide high wind data that can be geographically associated with  bridges. The National Weather Service GIS Portal has data on tornado occurrence across the USA. 

29      Flood. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) maintains the Digital Flood Insurance Rate  Map Database, which depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data.  The primary  risk classifications used are  the 1‐percent‐annual‐chance  flood event  (100 year),  the 0.2‐ percent‐annual‐chance flood event (500 year), and areas of minimal flood risk. Many state and county  governments also maintain flood zone maps, which in many cases provide the basis for the FEMA maps.  This information can be associated geographically with bridges to assign flood probabilities.  Wildfire. Some  states, and  the US Forest Service, maintain geographic data  sets on historical wildfire  experience.   Extreme  temperature. The National Weather Service maintains maps of extreme  temperature events  across  the nation. This  information has been changing rapidly  in  recent years. The CMIP Climate Data  Processing  Tool,  an  Excel  based  tool  developed  for  FHWA  in  2015,  utilizes  the  CMIP  3  and  CMIP  5  databases  to  create  usable  statistics  for  transportation  planners  for  temperature  and  precipitation  variables. The FHWA published Regional Climate Change Effects: Useful Information for Transportation  Agencies in 2010 that had estimates of temperature, precipitation, sea level and storm activity for every  region in the country – northeast, southeast, Midwest, Great Plains, southwest, Pacific Northwest, Alaska,  Hawaii and Puerto Rico.  Most of the data sources described here are actively maintained and can change frequently. This makes  it important to keep the assessment up‐to‐date. An updating interval of 4‐6 years is suggested for hazards  that are addressed in the bridge management system.  In the absence of geographically‐referenced data, it may be possible in some cases to rely on anecdotal  information, such as from news reports or studies taken from non‐transportation domains. For example,  the coasts of the Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico have been subject to extensive monitoring and studies  of  sea  level  rise, which  can be helpful  in making  judgments about  the  likelihood of  storm  surge and  tsunami.   Earthquakes of magnitude severe enough to damage transportation systems are reliably reported in the  media,  so  a  systematic  search may  provide  sufficient  information  on  strength  and  frequency.  Local  knowledge or news reports of floods can form the basis for a  localized assessment of flood  likelihood,  especially in combination with site evidence of past flooding. The same is true of landslides.  On the other hand, tornado and wildfire assessments should not rely on anecdotal reports since they are  an unreliable indicator of future event locations.  Other Sources include:   FEMA 433: Using HAZUS‐MH for Risk Assessment, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)  http://www.fema.gov/fema‐433‐using‐hazus‐mh‐risk‐assessment  FEMA Map Service Center  This Federal Emergency Management Agency source provides map information for a variety of users  affected by floods, including homeowners and renters, real estate and flood determination agents,  insurance agents, engineers and surveyors, and federal and exempt customers. There are flood maps,  databases, map viewers, documents and publications providing comprehensive information. Further  aspects of the site include FEMA issued flood maps available for purchase, definitions of FEMA flood 

30  zone designations, and information about FIRMettes, a full‐scale section of a FEMA Flood Insurance Rate  Map (FIRM) that users can create and print at no charge.  http://msc.fema.gov/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/FemaWelcomeView?storeId=10001&catalogId=10001 &langId=‐1  FEMA Flood Map Service Center (MSC)  The FEMA Flood  Map Service Center is the official public source for flood hazard information produced  in support of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The MSC contains official flood maps, access  a range of other flood hazard products, and tools for better understanding flood risk. subsection of   http://msc.fema.gov/portal/  Interior Geospatial Emergency Management System (IGEMS)  The Department of Interior Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center IGEMS, which replaced  the Natural Hazards Support System (NHSS),  provides online maps containing the latest available information  on earthquakes, earthquake shakemaps, streamflow data, floods, volcanoes, wildfires, and weather hazards.   http://igems.doi.gov/    National Weather Service GIS Data Portal (NOAA)  Current weather, forecasts and past weather data are available in Shapefile and other formats from the Data  Portal.  Hazards include tornados, hurricanes, rain, snowfall, floods and other weather related hazards.  http://www.nws.noaa.gov/gis/shapepage.htm  Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (NOAA)  The NOAA Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) is a web‐based suite of forecast products that  displays the magnitude and uncertainty of occurrence of floods or droughts, from hours to days and months,  in advance. The majority of the observed water level data displayed on the AHPS web pages originates from  the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) National Streamflow Information Program which maintains a  national network of stream gauges. In addition, real‐time water level information is collected from other  federal, state, and local stream gauge networks.  http://www.nws.noaa.gov/oh/ahps/  Hazard Tools  There has been, and continues to be, significant deployment of new resources and rapidly developing  technologies  to  support DOT  activities  such  as  Shakecast,  Floodcast  and  remote,  in‐situ,  or  portable  monitoring/damage detection techniques such as sensors, sonar, radar, satellite imagery and unmanned  aerial vehicles.  ShakeCast  ShakeCast  is a  tool  for raising situational awareness  in emergency response.  It  is an open‐source web  application that retrieves data within minutes after an earthquake and generates hierarchical  lists and 

31  maps  of  bridges most  likely  impacted. Notifications  are  then  sent  to  responders within  10 minutes  following the event.   The ShakeCast software conducts an analysis of  the measured or  interpolated ground motion at each  defined bridge location against a pre‐determined bridge fragility model. Responders can use the link in  the email to access additional information on the ShakeCast website such as viewing bridge data using  maps and tables along with fragility analysis results.  ShakeCast  can  also  be  used  to  evaluate  current  bridge  inventory  against  scenario  earthquakes  and  significant historical events.  Developed by the USGS with support from Caltrans, the latest version V3 was released in 2015.   FloodCast  FloodCast is a strategic framework for enhanced flood event decision making. The completed project will  help state DOTs manage risks and respond to flood and flash flood events.  

32  Risk Assessment and Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA)   The  latest Strategic National Risk Assessment stated that the Nation continues to face a wide range of  threats and hazards including:   Natural hazards, including hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, droughts, wildfires, winter storms, and floods, affect various parts of the Nation; climate change may increase the severity of their impacts.  A  virulent  strain of pandemic  influenza or human and animal  infectious diseases  could  cause significant loss of life and economic loss.  Technological  and  accidental  hazards,  such  as  transportation  system  failures,  dam  failures, chemical spills or releases, may result  in extensive fatalities and severe economic  impacts, and may increase due to aging infrastructure.  Terrorist organizations or affiliates may seek  to acquire and use weapons of mass destruction (WMD). At the same time, conventional terrorist threats such as “lone actors” using explosives and armed attacks persist.  Cyber‐attacks have the potential to cause cascading impacts with catastrophic consequences and can threaten the Nation’s security, economy, public safety and health. Also, cybersecurity is an important  core  capability  and  cyber  preparedness  needs  to  be  integrated  into  every  core capability. (NPG, 2015) The  FEMA Comprehensive Preparedness Guide  (CPG) 201 presented  the basic  steps of  a  Threat  and  Hazard  Identification and Risk Assessment  (THIRA)  that  included a process  for  identifying community‐ specific threats and hazards. It addressed setting capability targets for each core capability identified in  the National Preparedness Goal;  the  Second  Edition of CPG 201  included  an  estimation of  resources  needed to meet those capability targets. The Second Edition CPG 201 also included changes to the THIRA  process, streamlining the number of steps to conduct a THIRA and providing additional examples.    THIRA is a foundation of the National Preparedness System.  It is a four‐step risk assessment process that  provides  an  understanding  of  risks  and  helps  estimate  capability  requirements.  The  THIRA  process  standardizes the risk analysis process that emergency managers and homeland security professionals use  and builds on existing state, local, tribal, and territorial Hazard Identification and Risk Assessments by:  • Broadening the threats and hazards considered to include human‐caused threats and technological hazards. • Incorporating the whole community into the planning process, including individuals; families; businesses; faith‐based and community organizations; nonprofit groups; schools and academia; media outlets; and all levels of government, including local, state, tribal, territorial, and Federal partners. • Providing increased flexibility to account for community‐specific factors.

33         Figure 5: The THIRA Process  The THIRA Process  1. Identify Threats and Hazards of Concern: Based on a combination of experience, forecasting, subject  matter expertise, and other available resources, identify a list of the threats and hazards of primary  concern to the community.   2. Give the Threats and Hazards Context: Describe the threats and hazards of concern, showing how  they may affect the community.   3. Establish Capability Targets: Assess each threat and hazard in context to develop a specific capability  target for each core capability identified in the National Preparedness Goal. The capability target defines  success for the capability.   4. Apply the Results: For each core capability, estimate the resources required to achieve the capability  targets through the use of community assets and mutual aid, while also considering preparedness  activities, including mitigation opportunities.  

34           Table 3. Example template for organizing THIRA information.         

Next: Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program »
A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

State transportation agencies will always fulfill a role in the emergency-management effort - for all incidents, from the routine traffic incident through major emergencies to catastrophic events. State agency plans and procedures are expected (indeed required if the agency seeks federal compensation) to be related to state and regional emergency structures and plans. This involves multi-agency, multi‐jurisdictional cooperation in emergency planning and operations.

This pre-publication draft, NCHRP Research Report 931: A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies, is an update to a 2010 guide that provided an approach to all‐hazards emergency management and documented existing practices in emergency-response planning.

Significant advances in emergency management, changing operational roles at State DOTs and other transportation organizations, along with federal guidance issued since 2010, have resulted in a need to reexamine requirements for state transportation agency emergency-management functions, roles, and responsibilities.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!