National Academies Press: OpenBook

A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies (2019)

Chapter: Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program

« Previous: Section 3: Nature and Degree of Hazards/Threats
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 35
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 36
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 37
Page 38
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 38
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 39
Page 40
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 40
Page 41
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 41
Page 42
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 42
Page 43
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 43
Page 44
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 44
Page 45
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 45
Page 46
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 46
Page 47
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 47
Page 48
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 48
Page 49
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 49
Page 50
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 50
Page 51
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 51
Page 52
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 52
Page 53
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 53
Page 54
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 54
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 55
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 56
Page 57
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 57
Page 58
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 58
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 59
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 60
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 61
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 62
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 63
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 64
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 65
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 66
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 67
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 68
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 69
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 70
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 71
Page 72
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 72
Page 73
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 73
Page 74
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 74
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 75
Page 76
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 76
Page 77
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 77
Page 78
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 78
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 79
Page 80
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 80
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 81
Page 82
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 82
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 83
Page 84
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 84
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 85
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 86
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 87
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 88
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 89
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 90
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 91
Page 92
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 92
Page 93
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 93
Page 94
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 94
Page 95
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 95
Page 96
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 96
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
×
Page 97

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

35  Section 4. Develop an Emergency Preparedness Program  This section explains the emergency planning process and the all‐hazards approach to emergency  management; it also emphasizes that the process is a continuous one, not something done once and  then shelved.  In the overall emergency management/risk management, all‐hazards  approach,  the  state  transportation agency has  two distinct  roles:  (1) developing and maintaining its own  Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and (2) supporting the State EOP.    EOPs are closely connected to  planning efforts in the programmatic areas of emergency management.  There are many ways to develop an emergency management plan.  FEMA’s Comprehensive Preparedness  Guide 101 Version 2.0 (CPG 101, 2010), Developing and Maintaining Emergency Operations Plans provides FEMA  guidance on  the  fundamentals of planning  and developing  Emergency Operations Plans  (EOPs).    The  planning steps to develop an EOP are appropriate to developing other required plans to cover the five  programmatic  areas  discussed  in  Section  2  (Prevent,  Protect, Mitigate,  Respond,  and  Recover).  This  chapter thus provides transportation‐sector specific guidance towards building and sustaining capabilities  focused towards the pre‐designated set of risk‐based EM categories – “prevent, protect against, mitigate,  respond to, and recover from”, threats and hazards, through development and ongoing maintenance of  the Emergency Operations Plan.   The Planning process laid out in Chapter 4 of CPG 101, version 2 (see Figure 6) is used in this chapter as a  suggested framework to develop the EOP (the Plan).  The planning process “merges information from the  first three chapters [of CPG 101] and describes an approach for operational planning that  is consistent  with processes already familiar to most planners. When the planning process is used consistently during  the preparedness phase,  its use during operations  becomes  second nature.  The  goal  is  to make  the  planning process  routine  across  all phases of  emergency management  and  for  all homeland  security  mission areas.”  

36  Figure 6. Steps in the planning process.  CPG 101 version 2 (2010) emphasizes the following 14 principles of effective emergency planning:  1. Planning must be community‐based, representing the whole population and its needs. 2. Planning must include participation from all stakeholders in the community. 3. Planning uses a logical and analytical problem‐solving process to help address the complexity and uncertainty inherent in potential hazards and threats. 4. Planning considers all hazards and threats. 5. Planning should be flexible enough to address both traditional and catastrophic incidents. 6. Plans must clearly identify the mission and supporting goals (with desired results). 7. Planning depicts the anticipated environment for action. 8. Planning does not need to start from scratch. 9. Planning identifies tasks, allocates resources to accomplish those tasks, and establishes accountability. 10. Planning includes senior officials throughout the process to ensure both understanding and approval. 11. Time, uncertainty, risk, and experience influence planning. 12. Effective plans tell those with operational responsibilities what to do and why to do it, and they instruct those outside the jurisdiction in how to provide support and what to expect. 13. Planning is fundamentally a process to manage risk. 14. Planning is one of the key components of the preparedness cycle.

37  Planning Process  The planning steps in this section focus on the plan element of the  preparedness cycle, and also reference or incorporate other  elements of the preparedness cycle.  The preparedness cycle  includes five key phases‐ Plan, Organize/ Equip, Train, Exercise,  Evaluate/Improve‐ and is part of the National Preparedness  System, as illustrated in Figure 7 from FEMA.  The planning structures and templates are intended to assist in the  process of developing / updating state DOT emergency plans so  they are useful for the DOT in working with the state and with  other stakeholders in preparing for and responding to  emergencies.  The process described in the six steps of the CPG 101 Planning  Process chapter is geared towards helping an agency develop an  Emergency Operations Plan that will carry through the  preparedness and operational phases of an emergency.  The same  six steps of the process to develop an EOP (form a collaborative  planning team, understand the situation, determine goals and  objectives, plan development, plan preparation, review and  approval, and plan implementation and maintenance) are  intended to be replicated in developing other plans.    CPG 101 v.2 describes other plans besides the EOP to fully address the Prevent, Protect, Mitigate,  Respond, and Recover programmatic areas as follows.  The information in brackets and italics [text]  summarizes how these other plans are addressed in this guide and chapter.  Note that only the Planning  section in this chapter (the first section) strictly adheres to the six planning steps of CPG 101.  Other  sections (preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery) are expected to include some of the same  planning members, scenarios, and response strategies. The planning steps for these latter sections are  therefore abbreviated to focus on specific elements related to the phase.   Additional Types of Plans   As described in CPG 101, version 2, and as well‐known to DOTs and emergency managers, “emergency  operations involve several kinds of plans, just as they involve several kinds of actions. While the EOP is  often the centerpiece of emergency planning efforts,  it  is not the only plan that addresses emergency  management or homeland security missions. There are other types of plans that support and supplement  the EOP and its annexes.   “Joint Operational Plans or Regional Coordination Plans typically involve multiple levels of government to  address a specific  incident or a special event. These plans should be developed  in a manner consistent  with [CPG 101 v.2] and included as an annex or supplemental plan to the EOP, depending on the subject  of the plan. Standing plans should be an annex to the related EOPs, while special events plans should be  stand‐alone supplements based on the information contained within the related EOPs.” [Joint Operational  Plans or Regional Coordination Plans are not specifically addressed in this Chapter and Guide, although  the need for such coordination  is  identified at various  junctures.   The reference NCHRP Report 740, A  Figure 7 Preparedness Cycle from  the  National Preparedness System.  “The  National Preparedness System outlines  an organized process for everyone in  the whole community to move forward  with their preparedness activities and  achieve the National Preparedness  Goal”. FEMAX, 2016 Citation: Photo by  Sam Williams, Feb. 02, 2016.   https:///www.fema.gove/media‐ library/assets/images/114295#wcm‐ survey‐target‐id 

38  Transportation Guide for All‐Hazards Evacuation, has extensive operational information related to joint  operations,  and  a  template  tool  for  such  coordination;  NCHRP  Report  777,  Regional  Transportation  Planning for Disasters, Emergencies and Significant Events provides principles and case studies for such  coordination. This is discussed in more detail in Section 5 of this Guide.]    “Administrative  plans  describe  basic  policies  and  procedures  to  support  a  governmental  endeavor.  Typically, they deal less with external work products than with internal processes…Such plans are not the  direct concern of an EOP. However, planners should reference the administrative plan  in the EOP  if  its  provisions apply during an emergency. Planners should make similar references in the EOP for exceptions  to normal administrative plans permitted during an emergency.” [Administrative plans are not specifically  addressed in this Chapter and Guide.]   “Preparedness  plans  address  the  process  for  developing  and maintaining  capabilities  for  the whole  community  both  pre‐  and  post‐incident.  Preparedness  plans  should  address  capabilities  needed  for  prevention, protection, response, recovery, and mitigation activities. These plans include the schedule for  identifying and meeting training needs based on the expectations created by the EOP; the process and  schedule for developing, conducting, and evaluating exercises and correcting identified deficiencies; and  plans for procuring, retrofitting, or building facilities and equipment that could withstand the effects of  the  hazards  facing  the  jurisdiction.”    [Key  elements  of  preparedness  plans  are  addressed  in  the  Preparedness section of this chapter.]     “Continuity plans outline essential  functions  that must be performed during an  incident  that disrupts  normal operations and the methods by which these functions will be performed. They also describe the  process  for  timely  resumption  of  normal  operations  once  the  emergency  has  ended.  Continuity  of  Operations (COOP) plans address the continued performance of core capabilities and critical operations  during any potential  incident. Continuity of Government  (COG) plans address  the preservation and/or  reconstitution  of  government  to  ensure  that  constitutional,  legislative,  and/or  administrative  responsibilities are maintained.” [Continuity plans are not specifically addressed in this Guide.]    “Recovery plans developed prior to a disaster enable jurisdictions to effectively direct recovery activities  and expedite a unified recovery effort. Pre‐incident planning performed in conjunction with community  development planning helps to establish recovery priorities, incorporate mitigation strategies in the wake  of an  incident, and  identify options and  changes  that  should be  considered or  implemented after an  incident. Post‐incident community recovery planning serves to integrate the range of complex decisions  in the context of the incident and works as the foundation for allocating resources.” [Recovery plans are  briefly addressed in the Recovery section of this chapter.]     “Mitigation plans outline a jurisdiction’s strategy for mitigating the hazards it faces… Mitigation planning  is often a long‐term effort and may be part of or tied to the jurisdiction’s strategic development plan or  similar documents. Mitigation planning committees may differ from operational planning teams in that  they  include zoning boards,  floodplain managers, and  individuals with  long‐term cultural or economic  interests. Existing plans for mitigating hazards are relevant to an EOP since both originate from a hazard‐ based analysis and share similar component requirements.”       “Prevention and protection plans typically tend to be more facility focused and procedural or tactical in  their content” according to CPG 101, version 2. [Specific aspects of prevention and protection plans are 

39  not  otherwise  addressed  in  this  Guide.  See  Security  101:  A  Physical  and  Cybersecurity  Primer  for  Transportation Agencies.]    Procedural Documents   In addition to operational planning documents and procedures, DOT divisions, regions and districts will  require tactical plans and procedures on how to carry out the operational guidance. (See Figure 8.)  “Procedural documents describe how to accomplish specific activities needed to finish a task or achieve a  goal or objective. Put simply, plans describe  the “what” and procedures describe  the “how.” Planners  should prepare procedural documents to keep the plan free of unnecessary detail. The basic criterion is:  What does the audience of this part of the plan need to know or have set out as a matter of public record?  Information and how‐to  instructions used by an  individual or small group should appear  in procedural  documents.  The  plan  should  reference  procedural  documents  as  appropriate.”  [This  Guide  does  not  specifically address Procedural documents.]   Steps  in  this  chapter  are  designed  to  help  the  DOT  emergency management  coordinator  and  related  DOT  stakeholders  through  the  process  of  updating  the  emergency  response  plan  to  a  full  emergency  management  plan,  or  creating  an  emergency  management  plan  from  scratch.    Self‐assessments  and  collaboration are essential elements of both processes.   This chapter replicates some of the detail from the 2010  Guide,  including  the  FEMA  emphasis  on  whole  community  planning  and  capabilities.  Because  the  planning and  preparedness  phases  are  perhaps  the  best  way  to  maximize  the  success  and  safety  of  the  response and  recovery efforts, these sections provide greater detail. Self‐ assessment  checklists  are  included  in  Appendix  A.    Cross‐ references  to  other  sections,  such  as  the  section  on  Stakeholders and the new section on training, are also provided.  Finally, as agencies begin this process, it is important to reinforce that this is not a standard. This  is a  suggested process derived from the relevant national directives, policies, and guidelines introduced  in  Sections 1 and 2. Even the Comprehensive Preparedness Guideline 101 is just that—a  guideline. The  discussions  below  do  not  attempt  to  replace  or  unnecessarily  duplicate  CPG  101,  although some  reference and duplication are necessary. More significantly, the 2017  Guide attempts  to fill in gaps unique  to  transportation  that are not explicit  in CPG 101 and provides a means  for  state  transportation  agencies to perform self‐assessments of their own emergency planning,  preparedness, mitigation,  Figure 8 Relationship between Strategic, Operational and  Tactical Planning (CPG 101, V. 2, 2010).  Tip:  Before beginning the formal  steps of the guide, the DOT  emergency planner may want to  conduct a preliminary research  review, using the “usefulness in  practice” questions in Step 5 (Plan  Preparation, Review and Approval),  Phase 19 (Review the Plan).   

40  response, and recovery processes. As noted in paragraph 1 of  this  section  the  prime  directives  for  the  DOT  are  (1)  developing  and  maintaining  its  own  EOP  and  (2)  supporting the state EOP.   Emergency Planning Phase  The planning phase is arguably the most important step in  developing  and  administering  an  effective  emergency  preparedness  program.  Without  proper  planning,  emergency response personnel can easily find themselves  significantly hampered by the confusion and contradictory  actions  often  encountered  during  complex  emergency  response  activities.  As  state  transportation  agencies  assume greater levels of responsibility for managing large‐ scale evacuations in  response to natural disasters, as well  as no‐notice evacuations, shelter‐in‐place, or quarantine in  response  to  biological  outbreaks,  large‐scale  hazardous  chemical releases, and WMD threats, the need for planning  at the agency level also increases. Consistent with National  Incident  Management  System  (NIMS)  and  National  Response Framework  (NRF)  requirements, an all‐hazards  approach to emergency planning must be taken to ensure the agency’s ability to respond appropriately  to all emergency events.   Further, Hurricanes Sandy, Irene, and similar extreme‐weather‐related events have led federal and  state  transportation  agencies  to  place more  focus  on  “rebuilding  better”  and  on  incorporating  resilience  into operations, maintenance, asset management, and design practices.   The mitigation  program area of emergency management  is achieving greater prominence among the emergency  management program areas, as mitigation  is clearly tied to resilience. Planning for mitigation and  resilience facilitates recovery, while  implementing mitigation and resilience projects and practices  prior to an event can lessen the impacts of a disaster.  There also is a distinction between a state transportation agency managing its specific responsibilities,  as directed, in large‐scale evacuations as part of the larger emergency management activity versus  actually managing large‐scale evacuations, which is not typically the agency’s role. Put another way, in  relatively  small incidents, the state transportation agency will play a proactive role in managing the  incident,  perhaps  in  a  supporting  role  to  law  enforcement;  however,  in  a  major  incident/evacuation/shelter‐  in‐place/quarantine, while the agency’s role might be a major one, it is  expressly a supporting role.  With these fundamental principles in mind, the discussion of emergency planning begins by reviewing  the steps necessary to create an effective emergency planning process,  realizing  that emergency  planning does not need to start from scratch. This is especially true in  today’s environment‐ post‐ 9/11,  Hurricane  Katrina,  Superstorm  Sandy  and  more‐  in  which  most  states  have  emergency  planning processes in place.   Tip:  DOT emergency planners are  encouraged to read the CPG 101  version 2 cautions on the selection  and use of templates (CPG 101,  section 3‐8 3). Veteran emergency  managers note that events never  “follow the plan”, and that the  personal and institutional  relationships that are developed and  fostered while creating and exercising  the plan are the golden keys to  overcoming the unexpected‐ which  essentially defines a disaster. Short  cuts and “filling in the blanks” in  templates will not forge those crucial  bonds.   

41  This  Guide  also  recognizes  that  there  are  numerous,  acceptable  planning  processes  that  state  transportation agencies can take that may not exactly match the processes discussed here. For example,  NCHRP Report 740, A Transportation Guide for All‐Hazards Evacuation, follows the six CPG 101 v.2 steps  to help  agencies develop  transportation plans  for  all hazard  emergency  evacuation. By  contrast,  the  emergency planning process provided in the Appendices as part of an overall Emergency Operations Plan  template  also  employs  six  steps,  but with  different  emphases  in  different  order,  as  another  process  example (see Table 4). Common elements are collaboration, research, review, and the need to validate  and  perpetuate  the  planning  and  learning  cycle‐  in  brief,  embracing  the  14  principles  of  emergency  management planning described in CPG 101 v.2 (2010). Regardless of the approach used, each planning  process should  address the 14 key CPG 101 principles and meet the requirements of NIMS and the NRF.  Table 4: Example DOT Emergency Planning Process  Step  Activities/ focus  1. Research Research organization planning process, hazards, resource base, organization  characteristics  2. Review Review local, state, Federal laws, regulations, guidance; plans and agreements for  /with jurisdiction, neighboring jurisdictions, sister agencies, tribal authorities,  private sector organizations, military installations, etc.  3. Development Rough draft of plan, functional annexes, hazard‐specific appendices, agenda and  invitation lists for first cycle of planning meetings  4. Brief the “CEO” Convene presentation and planning meetings, develop and revise plan, obtain  concurrence and approval, distribute plan  5. Validation EOP review cycle, exercises  6. Maintenance Establish remedial action process, revision process, organizational implementing  documents e.g. SOPs  The following provides updated guidance to state transportation agencies pertaining to the most  recent  federal emergency planning policies and resources, including the all‐hazards approach to emergency  management required by NIMS and the NRF. Appendix A includes self‐assessment checklists related to  each  step.    Appendix  F  includes  an  example  template  for  an  EOP  and  its  supporting  annexes,  consistent with Emergency Management Accreditation Program (EMAP) requirements. Being NIMS‐ compliant  is  important,  as  is  developing  workable  emergency  plans  that  meet  all  participants’  expectations. 

42  Figure 8: Steps in the Planning Process  Step 1—Form a Collaborative Planning Team  CPG 101 states, “Planners achieve unity of purpose through coordination and integration of plans across  all levels of government, nongovernmental organizations, the private sector, and individuals and families.”  Simply  put,  planning  is  a  continuous  and  ongoing  process  that  requires  the  active  participation  of,  involvement  of,  and  coordination  with  all  levels  of  government.  The  reason  for  using  a  multi‐ organizational and multidisciplinary planning team  is clear—a broad range of expertise  is necessary to  effectively implement the all‐ hazards approach of emergency management prescribed by NIMS and the  NRF.  Given  the number and  complexity of  the different hazards a  community may  face,  it  is exceptionally  difficult for any one  individual, or even an organization, to be fully versed  in how to best prepare for,  respond  to,  and  recover  from  every  hazard,  particularly  when  the  incident  escalates.  Forming  a  collaborative planning team enables all participants  to gain a better understanding of  the capabilities,  needs, and response tactics of each organization  involved  in the response activities. Forming the team  also addresses Principles 1 (planning must be community‐based, representing the whole population and  its needs) and 2, (planning must include participation from all stakeholders in the community) by enabling  team participants to better understand how the decisions made by emergency managers and responders  at all government levels may affect the ability of others to fulfill their response requirements. The four  key phases in Step 1 are described below.5  5 Recall that much of this information, including the supporting references, is summarized in tabular form in  “Organizational, Staffing, and Position Guidance” in Section 6. 

43      PLAN Phase 01: Identify and Designate a Lead Emergency Planning Coordinator (EPC) and Staff to Oversee  the State Transportation Agency Emergency Planning Process  Purpose. Designate  the best‐qualified  individuals  and  team  to  lead  the  state  transportation  agency’s  emergency planning function.  Actions.  Designate  a  lead  Emergency  Planning  Coordinator  (EPC)  and  staff  to  oversee  the  agency’s  emergency planning process. Vest the EPC with adequate authority and resources to fulfill the goals and  objectives of the agency’s emergency management program.    Focus. Develop a comprehensive EOP and coordinate state transportation agency emergency planning and  management  activities  with  the  state’s  NIMS  coordinator.  For  the  State  EOP,  the  State  Emergency  Management Agency (SEMA) will likely have formed the team, with the transportation agency being a lead  agency for ESF #1  (Transportation) and ESF #3  (Public Works) and  supporting  others.  This  team  would  typically  include  DHS  and  FEMA  regional  offices  and  personnel;  state  emergency  management  representatives;  law enforcement personnel; public health  officials; emergency fire, medical and rescue  services personnel; and even some local EMAs.  For the state transportation agency’s EOP, the team will tend more toward regional and local levels, including  agencies that would be part of traffic    incident and emergency response in the absence  of State EOC (SEOC)  activation. There should be total consistency between the state’s and the transportation agency’s EOPs from the  top‐down perspective, but the agency’s EOP will have more details  and probably a broader set of partners— more locally oriented—than the State EOP. Typical stakeholders are identified in Section 5.  PLAN Phase 02: Engage the Whole Community in Planning  Purpose. Ensure  the state  transportation agency EPC and core planning  team are engaging  the whole  community in planning.  Actions.  The  Emergency Management  Team  develops  an  initial  list  of  potential  partners.    (Tip: DOT  Environmental Justice outreach and planning teams may provide useful contacts and starting points. TCRP  Report 150, Communication with Vulnerable Populations: A Transportation and Emergency Management  Toolkit, provides  steps and  tools  to carry out and  sustain  such planning.)   Figure9  from CPG 101 v. 2  identifies key elements in developing a community map and initiating such working relationships.   

44  Figure 9 Forming A Whole Community Collaborative Partnership ‐ CPG 101, V.2  PLAN Phase 03: Issue Mission Statement for the Planning Team  Purpose.  Clarify the purpose of the state transportation agency’s emergency planning function.  Actions. The state transportation agency Chief Executive Officer (CEO) should issue a mission and vision  statement  to  demonstrate  the  agency’s  commitment  to  emergency  planning.6 The  statement  should  define and/or identify the following:   Scope of activities to be performed by the EPC and Planning Team,  The agency’s high‐level goals for the emergency planning process, 6 References to the Chief Executive Officer are not intended to imply that he or she performs the work indicated—  staff typically does that—but it is important that the CEO strongly endorse the work effort. 

45       Documents and/or programs to be developed by the agency’s emergency planning team. The  statement should emphasize that the entire organization should be involved in creating these  documents and programs, and   The authority and structure of the planning group.  Focus. Develop a comprehensive EOP and coordinate state transportation agency emergency planning and  management activities with the state’s NIMS coordinator.  PLAN Phase 04: Establish Authority, Schedule and Budget of the Planning Team  Purpose. Ensure the state transportation agency’s Emergency Planning Coordinator (EPC) and Planning  Team have adequate authority, schedule and budget to perform the emergency planning function.  Actions. Demonstrate management’s commitment and promote an atmosphere of cooperation by  authorizing the agency EPC and Planning Team to take the steps necessary to develop/update the  agency’s emergency plans and response program. Support this action by participating in the State EOP  process.  Establish a clear line of authority between team members and the state transportation agency EPC.  Upper management should appoint participants to the planning team in writing. Participant job  descriptions could also reflect this assignment. Roles and relationships with partners from the whole  community‐ private sector, community based organizations, and more‐ should also be made explicit.   The Emergency Management Team defines specific goals and objectives of the emergency management  process and performance metrics. Establish a work schedule and planning deadlines. Modify timelines  as priorities become more clearly defined. Develop an initial budget for research, printing, seminars,  consulting services, and other expenses that may be necessary during the development process.  Focus. Develop a comprehensive EOP and coordinate state transportation agency emergency planning  and management activities with the state’s NIMS coordinator. Ensure the state transportation agency  EPC and Planning Team have adequate resources and schedule to perform the emergency planning  function.  Step 1 Observations  CPG 101 provides significantly more detail pertaining to the emergency planning process and the  potential members who can be included on a collaborative planning team.  Step 2—Understand the Situation  Conduct Research to Identify Hazards and Threats and Analyze Gathered Data  Consistent with CPG 101 V.2 Principle 3 ‐ Planning uses a logical and analytical problem‐solving process to  help address  the complexity and uncertainty  inherent  in potential hazards and  threats‐  it  is clear  that  some degree of research and analysis must be performed at the state transportation agency level to (1)  identify  the hazards and  threats  that may exist or occur  in  the agency’s region and  (2) determine  the  appropriate  actions  that  can  be  taken  to  respond.  Forming  a  collaborative  team  (per  Step  1)  is  also  essential to the research and analysis process for the same reason. 

46      While emergency management planners may be able to draw from previous experiences and known facts,  in many cases, assumptions will need to be made to analyze the risks, resources, needs, and capabilities  required to respond to differing emergencies. Involving the planning team, including whole community  participation,  in  the  research and analysis process  should help  identify as many  facts as possible and  minimize assumptions.   PLAN Phase 05: Identify Documents to be Developed, Reviewed, Approved, and/or Updated Regarding the  State Transportation Agency’s Emergency Response  Plans and Programs  Purpose. Clarify  the  scope of  the  state  transportation  agency’s  emergency planning process  and  the  expected deliverables and outcomes.  Actions.  Identify  the documents  to be developed,  reviewed, approved, and/or updated  regarding  the  agency’s emergency response plans and programs. This action would focus not only on the transportation‐ related  elements  of  the  State  EOP,  but  also  on  any  specific  plans,  guidance,  overviews  documents,  standard operating procedures (SOPs), operating manuals, field operations guides (FOGs), handbooks, or  job aids needed to support the capabilities of agency personnel to respond to emergencies.   Focus. The state transportation agency emergency planning process begins with the State EOP and the  functional  annexes  and  hazard‐specific  appendices.  Specific  plans,  procedures,  or  other  documents  developed by the transportation agency and/or other agencies may support implementation of the State  EOP, including the following:     Overview and Primers—a brief concept summary of a function, team, or capability.   Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) or Operations Manuals—complete reference  documents detailing the procedures for performing a single function (SOP) or a number of  interdependent  functions  (Operations Manual).   Field Operations Guide (FOGs) or Handbooks—durable pocket or desk guides, containing  essential, basic information needed to perform specific assignments or functions.   Job Aids—checklists or other aids useful in performing or training for a specific job to be per‐  formed in the EOP.   Other plans may be available for state transportation review, including the state’s or agency’s  o Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP);  o Continuity of Government Plan (COG);  o Critical Infrastructure/Key Resources (CI/KR) Protection Plans; and  o Pandemic Flu Plan.   Transportation‐specific plans may include:  o Transportation/Traffic Incident Management Plans; and  o Emergency Response Plans and Hazard‐Specific Response Plans (e.g., snow/ice,  hurricane, and responses like contraflow operations).  PLAN Phase 06: Work with State NIMS Coordinator to Identify State Transportation Agency Requirements  for Addressing Statewide Implementation of the National Incident Management System  Purpose. Ensure compliance and coordination with statewide initiatives to meet NIMS requirements. 

47      Actions. Work with the State NIMS Coordinator to identify state transportation agency requirements for  addressing  statewide  NIMS  implementation.  If  necessary,  provide  NIMS  training  for  the  agency  Emergency Planning Coordinator and team.  Focus. Develop relationships and capacity to determine and develop compliance actions to ensure state  transportation agency actions comply with NIMS. The agency planning team should meet with the State  NIMS  Coordinator  to  establish  a working  relationship  for  addressing NIMS  compliance  issues  and  to  determine  if  the  agency  should  have  a NIMS  coordinator.  If  so,  and  if  one  is  not  already  assigned,  determine whether the agency Emergency Planning Coordinator should assume this role. This role may  include the following:   Receive and review a copy of the State’s NIMS Implementation Plan.   Obtain from the State NIMS Coordinator a clear list of NIMS requirements being addressed by the  state and any outstanding corrective action plans (CAPs) filed with FEMA that may relate to the  transportation agency.  PLAN Phase 07: Review State EOP and Supporting Annexes and Appendices and Other Documents for  Transportation‐Related Activities  Purpose. Determine  how  the  State  EOP  and  supporting  annexes,  appendices,  and  other  documents  address transportation issues, requirements, and needs.  Actions. Work with the State NIMS Coordinator to obtain a copy of State EOP and supporting annexes,  appendices, and other documents. Ensure  that  state  transportation agency plans and procedures are  consistent with the State EOP.  Focus.  Traditionally,  State  EOPs  have  not  recognized  the  full  capabilities  of  transportation  agencies,  particularly in the intelligent transportation systems (ITS) arena. Based on the information gathered from  the State EOP, the transportation agency may find it necessary to update or modify its contributions to  the State EOP (usually ESFs #1 and #3 from the National Response Framework‐ some states and regions  may  use  different  nomenclature)  and  perhaps  revise  the  emergency  management  and  response  procedures and protocols in the agency EOP to better mesh with those prescribed by the State EOP.  PLAN Phase 08: Review Relevant Hazards Likely to Result in an Emergency Requiring Activation of State  Emergency Operations Center  Purpose.      Identify and analyze  the potential hazards and  threats  in  the state  transportation agency’s  region to evaluate the full progression of how they will occur and be resolved by the region.  Actions. Beginning with an identified hazard, evaluate its impacts in terms of probability and severity. This  action  can  be  accomplished  using  CAPTA/CAPTool  available  as  part  of  NCHRP  Report  525:  Surface  Transportation Security, Volume 15: Costing Asset Protection: An All Hazards Guide for Transportation  Agencies  (CAPTA). Determine  realistic  response  activities  and  the  consequences of not being  able  to  complete these activities.  Focus. The culmination of this process is development of hazard scenarios that form the foundation for  writing or updating  the state  transportation agency’s emergency preparedness plan and/or protocols.  Analyzing the levels of probability and severity of each identified hazard helps agency emergency planners  prioritize  the  actions  necessary  to  prepare  for  such  events  and  helps  determine  and  communicate  acceptable levels of risk. 

48      PLAN Phase 09: Gather Information Regarding Vulnerable Populations  Purpose. Identify the special dynamics of affected areas  including knowing the best evacuation routes,  shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  locations,  points  of  entry  and  exit,  the  demographics  of  seniors  and  vulnerable populations, and the special equipment and services necessary to evacuate, shelter‐in‐place,  or quarantine these citizens safely.  Actions. Work with whole community partners brought in as part of Plan Phase 02 to gather additional  information  and  partners.   Work with  the  State NIMS  Coordinator,  partner  transportation  agencies,  broad‐based as well as narrowly focused social service and community‐based organizations, and other  whole  community  stakeholders  to  identify  transportation‐disadvantaged  and  vulnerable  populations.  Working with the community, develop plans and procedures, and assemble resources needed to safely  evacuate, shelter‐in‐place, or quarantine these populations. When developing the mitigation portions of  the plan, use the demographic information and contacts to ensure that mitigation and resilience planning  and implementation is inclusive of the whole community.   Focus.  Improve  emergency  response  capabilities  and  processes  for  evacuating  transportation‐ disadvantaged and vulnerable populations.  PLAN Phase 10: Determine Status of State Transportation Agency Emergency Planning Activities and Data to  Identify Areas Needing Improvement  Purpose: Assess what still needs to be done.  Actions. Verify that the agency has completed procedures regarding how to work with the state to  request federal assistance.  Focus. Improve emergency response capabilities and processes.  PLAN Phase 11: Define Response Issues, Roles, and Tasks by Reviewing Universal Task List, Target  Capabilities List, Resource Typing List, and National Planning Scenarios  Purpose. Ensure coordination with DHS and FEMA guidance.  Actions. Work with the State NIMS Coordinator and partner transportation agencies. Develop plans and  procedures, and assemble resources needed to respond safely to emergency events.  Focus.  Improve emergency response capabilities and processes.  PLAN Phase 12: Based on Activities Identified in State EOP and Supporting Annexes and Appendices,  Develop/Update State Transportation Agency’s Transportation Incident Management Organization to  Ensure All Activities Conform to National Incident Management System and National Response Framework  Requirements  Purpose. Ensure that an incident management organization, compliant with NIMS, has been established  to  integrate state transportation personnel  into the  Incident Command System (ICS) to be used during  emergencies requiring activation of the State EOC.  Actions. Update organization charts and determine whether specific teams, groups, committees, and/or  temporary organizations will be used to manage state transportation agency responses to emergencies  identified  in the State EOP. Review agency Traffic Incident Management (TIM) Plans and Protocols and 

49      specific emergency response plans to  identify  incident management structures currently used.  Identify  and train agency field personnel in charge of on‐scene response in procedures to coordinate with the ICS  established by the local or state emergency response agencies on scene.  Focus.  Improve emergency response capabilities and processes.  Step 3—Determine Goals and Objectives     CPG 101 defines goals as “. . . broad, general statements that indicate the intended solution to problems  identified by planners during the previous step” [referring here to Understanding the Situation‐ Identifying  Threats and Hazards and Assessing Risk]. CPG 101 also defines objectives as being “. . . more specific and  identifiable  actions  carried  out  during  the  operation…Translating  these  objectives  into  activities,  implementing procedures, or operating procedures by responsible organizations  is part of planning. As  goals and objectives are set, planners may identify more requirements that will feed into the development  of courses of action as well as the capability estimate (see Step 4.) ” (CPG 101, v. 2, 2010).  Defining  the  goals  and  objectives  of  emergency  planning  and  response  activities  involve  two  phases  (phase 13 and 14) as described below.  PLAN Phase 13: Establish State Transportation Agency Operational Priorities in Response to Hazards  Identified in Existing State EOP and Supporting Documents, as well as New Challenges Identified during  Analysis Process  Purpose. Clarify what the state transportation agency must accomplish to achieve a desired end state for  the operation.    Actions. Build  incident scenarios based on realistic hazard/ threats and risk data. Each scenario should  include:    Prevention/ protection   Initial warning – develop and analyze the likely course of action‐ e.g., evacuation, shelter in place,  both, depending on incident and location   Impact/ specific consequences   Response requirements. Requirements can be generated by the hazard or threat, by the response,  and by constraints/ restraints.    Once the requirements are identified and confirmed, response requirements should be restated  as priorities 

50      Focus.  Identify  the  requirements  that determine  actions  and  resources.  PLAN Phase 14: Establish State Transportation Agency Response  Goals and Intermediate Objectives in Response to Hazards  Identified in Existing State EOP and Supporting Documents, as  well as New Challenges Identified during Analysis Process  Purpose. Clarify what  constitutes  success  regarding  the  state  transportation agency’s response to the range of emergencies  that could occur  resulting  from  the hazards  identified  for  the  state.  Actions.  Develop  state  transportation  agency  goals  and  objectives  that  build  on  the  emergency  response  needs  and  demands of the agency and its partners, as determined through  hazard analysis and risk assessment activities described above.   Focus. Ensure that goals and objectives support accomplishing  the  plan  mission  and  operational  priorities,  and  that  they  indicate the desired result or end state.  Step 4— Plan Development   Develop and Analyze Courses of Action and Identify Resources  Once  possible  hazards  and  threats  have  been  identified,  the  state transportation agency’s planning team should develop the plan.  The team will need to analyze the  courses  of  action  necessary  to  respond  to  each  hazard  and/or  threat. While  the  hazard  and  threat  identification process may largely entail scenario‐based planning, developing the courses of action to take  in  response  to  hazards  and  threats  often  requires  functional  and  capabilities‐based  planning.  The  objective of these planning processes is to force the planning team to imagine how response activities will  unfold through the course of the response, beginning with the onset of the emergency and ending with a  full  return  to normal operations. This  includes  identifying  the actions  that will be  taken by  the  state  transportation agency and all other response agencies, the resources necessary to ensure the safety and  success of response efforts, and the information and intelligence needs required for success. This process  includes Phases 15, 16 and 17, which follow.    NCHRP REPORT 740 A TRANSPORTATION GUIDE FOR ALL‐HAZARDS EVACUATION employs the CPG 101 steps  for evacuation planning. Step 4 in the Guide includes flowcharts to assist in developing timelines and tools  to  support  resource  typing,  database  development,  checklists  for  interagency  communications  and  coordination, and more. Though geared  to evacuation planning,  the Guide also  includes  tips  for using  special event planning to assist in emergency planning.   Example: Relationships among the Mission, Operational Priorities, Goals, and Objectives Plan Mission: Effectively coordinate and direct available resources to protect the public and property from hazards or threats. Operational Priority: Protect the public from hurricane weather and storm surge. Goal: Complete evacuation before arrival of tropical storm winds. Desired result: All self- and assisted evacuees are safely outside of the expected impact area prior to impact. Objective: Complete tourist evacuation 72 hours before arrival of tropical storm winds. Desired result: tourist segment of public  protected prior to hazard onset, allowing  resources to be redirected to accomplishing  other objectives in support of this goal or other  goals.  Example from CPG 101, v.2 

51      PLAN Phase 15: Use Scenario‐Based, Functional, and  Capabilities‐Based Planning to Depict how the State  Transportation Agency’s Response to a Range of  Emergency Situations May Unfold  Purpose.  Employ  an  all‐hazards  approach  to  emergency management.  Actions.  Use  a  formal  process  for  building  relationships  among  the  occurrence  of  hazards,  decision points, and response actions, including the  following:   Establish a timeline for the event and response  actions, depending on the type of hazard or threat  to be addressed.   Depict  the  scenario  developed  in  Step  3,  and  place  the  incident  information  on  the  timeline.  Keep  in mind  the  goals  and  objectives  discussed  above  that  are  to  be  fulfilled  during  response  activities.   Identify and depict operational  tasks.  For each  operational task, planners should be able to answer  the following questions:  o What is the action?  o Who is responsible for the action?  o When should the action take place?  o How long should the action take and how much  time is actually available?  o What has to happen before?  o What happens after?  o What resources does the person/ entity need to  perform the action?   (Questions from CPG 101. V.  2, 2010).   Select courses of action. Assess progress made  toward  the end  state;  identify whether goals and  objectives are being met and  if any new needs or  demands  develop;  identify  tasks  that,  if  not  completed, would cause  the  response  to  fail; and  check  for  omissions  and  gaps,  inconsistencies  in  organizational  relationships,  and  mismatches  between  the  plans  of  the  state  transportation  agency  and  other  response  parties  and  jurisdictions.    Supporting Planning Concepts  Scenario‐based Planning. This approach starts with  building  a  scenario  for  a hazard or  threat. Then,  planners  analyze  the  impact  of  the  scenario  to  determine appropriate courses of action. Planners  typically  use  this  planning  concept  to  develop  planning  assumptions,  primarily  for  hazard‐  or  threat‐specific annexes to a basic plan.   Function‐based  planning  (functional  planning).  This  approach  identifies  the  common  functions  that  a  jurisdiction  must  perform  during  emergencies. Function‐based planning defines the  function to be performed and some combination  of  government  agencies  and  departments  responsible  for  its  performance  as  a  course  of  action.   Capabilities‐based Planning. This approach focuses  on  a  jurisdiction’s  capacity  to  take  a  course  of  action.  Capabilities‐based  planning  answers  the  question,  “Do  I  have  the  right  mix  of  training,  organizations,  plans,  people,  leadership  and  management, equipment, and facilities to perform  a  required  emergency  function?”  Some planners  view this approach as a combination of scenario‐  and  function‐based  planning  because  of  its  “scenario‐to‐task‐to‐capability” focus.   In reality, planners commonly use a combination of  the  three  previous  approaches  to  operational  planning‐… the hybrid approach. Using the hybrid  approach  converts  requirements  generated  by  a  scenario  into goals  and objectives  that drive  the  planning  process.  It  leads  to  a  basic  plan  that  describes  overarching  roles,  relationships,  and  responsibilities with functional, hazard, and threat  annexes  that  reflect  sequencing  of  actions.  A  hybrid  planning  approach  helps  identify  the  courses of action that a jurisdiction must be able to  take and  the  required  functions  it must perform  based upon a comprehensive risk analysis; thus, it  helps  identify  the  capabilities  a  jurisdiction must  have.  FEMA  strongly  advocates  the  hybrid  approach.   CPG 101, v. 2 (2010)

52      Focus.  Identify  and  analyze  hazards  and  risks  faced  by  the  state  transportation  agency  and  develop  response plans and procedures that can be used to safely mitigate and control these hazards and risks.  PLAN Phase 16: Identify Resources Needed to Support State Transportation Agency’s Emergency Response  Activities  Purpose. Ensure adequate resources are available for emergency response efforts.  Actions. Use a  formal process  to  identify  resource  shortfalls  including all  facilities vital  to emergency  operations and how they may be affected by individual hazards or threats, and develop a list of alternative  resources  that may be obtained  from neighboring  states or  jurisdictions, or private suppliers.  Identify  additional information needs to help drive decision‐making and response actions.  The  Emergency Management  Assistance  Compact  (EMAC),  administered  by  the  National  Emergency  Management  Association  (NEMA),  is  a  congressionally  ratified  organization  that  provides  form  and  structure to interstate mutual aid (FEMA‐EMAC, 2007). The EMAC should be a significant part of the State  EOP,  including  the preparation,  response,  and  recovery processes.  Likewise,  the  EMAC  should play  a  significant role in the state transportation agency’s EOC structure and operations, especially if the state is  authorized  to  use  EMAC  locally.  Through  EMAC,  a  disaster‐impacted  state  can  request  and  receive  assistance from other member states quickly and efficiently, with liability and reimbursement terms and  conditions already addressed and accepted at the state level. It is important in this regard that all involved  in  emergency management  use NIMS  resource  typing  to  ensure  consistency with  standard  resource  definitions to receive timely responses to fulfill the request from other states or FEMA.  Focus.  Identify and analyze all possible hazards and risks faced by the state transportation agency and  develop response plans and procedures that can be used to safely mitigate and control these hazards and  risks.  PLAN Phase 17: Identify Information and Intelligence Needs to Support State Transportation Agency’s  Emergency Response Activities  Purpose. Ensure that information and intelligence requirements and resources are identified along with  their deadlines for receiving it to drive decisions and trigger critical actions.   Actions. The two major and equally  important facets of  identifying  information and  intelligence needs  are:  •  Interagency,  interdisciplinary, and  interjurisdictional  communication and  information exchanges  (internal communication), and   •  Accurate  and  timely  communication  with  the  public  and  with  community  partners  in  the  communication network (if active) (public communications).   In the planning stages of internal communication:  •  Clarify what  information will  be  exchanged with  counterparts within  functional  area  in  other  jurisdictions;  • Determine which communications are necessary within each  jurisdiction across other  functional  areas; and 

53       Work out the logistics of how to communicate. Practice sharing information between Emergency  Operations Centers (EOCs) and Traffic Management Centers (TMCs) and, if appropriate, with Fusion  Centers (DHS funded). In the planning stages of public communication:  o Decide how to communicate with the public in a clear, consistent manner.   o Work very closely with ESF #15, External Affairs.  o Include in pre‐scripted messaging and public education efforts   ‐ The meaning of terms,   ‐ Evacuation routes,   ‐ What to take and what to leave behind,   ‐ Information on transporting pets,   ‐ Where to meet for pick‐ups if transportation is needed,   ‐ Advantages of a “buddy system,” and  ‐ How to obtain transportation assistance if needed.  o Keep messages consistent as possible across the jurisdictions in the planning area.   o Include community partners with strong  ties  to  the whole community,  in particular  to groups and  individuals with  access  and  functional needs.  (Refer  to TCRP Report 150 on how  to establish and  engage a community network.)   o Use multiple media, communications methods, and languages that are accessible to the deaf  and hard of hearing, to those who are blind or of low vision, to those who do not speak English,  and to those who may have cognitive disorders.   o Employ social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, to reach the broadest possible audience.  o  Keep messages simple, clear, and accurate.  The  Checklist  for  Inter‐Agency  Communications  and  Information  Sharing  (from NCHRP  Report  740  found in Appendix A) provides worksheets to plan and track communication within transportation, across  jurisdictions and multiple stakeholders, and public communication through multiple stages of an event. It  is  intended  for use  in planning, and could be one of the  tools used  in an  Intelligence and  Information  Exchange Workshop (among many workshops recommended in Report 740).     Focus.  Identify, plan and practice communications and information exchanges on multiple dimensions.   Step 5—Plan Preparation, Review and Approval   Each  of  the  above  activities  sets  the  groundwork  for  writing  or  updating  the  state  and/or  state  transportation agency Emergency Operations Plan(s); however, when discussing how best  to write an  EOP,  agencies must  consider  two  fundamentals of  emergency  planning.  First, planning  assigns  tasks,  allocates resources, and establishes accountability. This means that an effective EOP must clearly define  the organizational roles and responsibilities of transportation agency personnel, as well as those of other  emergency response agencies. Second, effective EOPs not only tell those within the planning community  what to do (the tasks) and why to do them (the purposes), effective EOPs also inform those outside the  jurisdiction about how to cooperate and provide support and what to expect. The best way to incorporate  this principle  in  the plan development, review, and revision process  is  to use  the state  transportation  agency’s emergency planning team, supported by members of the whole community. The plan must then  be  formally  approved.  The  fundamental  principles  of  emergency  planning  dictate  that  the  planning  process includes senior officials throughout the process to ensure both understanding and buy‐in. This is  achieved most  successfully  when  senior  leadership  has  been  involved  from  the  onset  of  the  state 

54  transportation agency’s planning activities. Completion of the following three key phases (phases 18, 19  and 20) will fulfill this step.  PLAN Phase 18: Write the Plan  Develop  and/or  Update  Transportation‐Related  Components  of  State  EOP,  Functional  Annexes,  and  Hazard‐Specific Appendices; Develop  and/or Update  Supporting Materials;  Include any  Specific Plans,  Guidance, Overviews, Documents, SOPs, Operating Manuals, FOGs, Handbooks, and Job Aids Needed to  Support Capabilities of State Transportation Agency Personnel to Respond to Emergencies.  Purpose. Complete state transportation planning inputs and deliverables for the State EOP and supporting  documents, and ensure  that  sufficient  reference materials exist  to  support  the  training and  response  activities of state transportation personnel during emergencies..  Actions.    Establish expectations regarding transportation functions during the range of potential incidents addressed in the State EOP.  Develop/update transportation‐related components of the State SOP, the functional annexes to the State EOP, and the hazard‐specific appendices to the State EOP.  Ensure  that state  transportation agency  liaisons are available  to support  the State EOC and,  if applicable, the county/municipal EOCs, TMC(s) and/or FC(s), during a state‐declared emergency.  Identify needed state transportation agency plans or documents to be developed, including any agency‐specific emergency response plans, COOP/COG plans, etc. Supporting actions may include developing the following: o SOPs  detailing  the  procedures  for  performing  individual  functions  identified  in  the transportation‐related component of the State EOP and hazard‐specific annexes. o If  applicable,  an  Operations  Manual  detailing  the  performance  of  a  number  of interdependent functions specified  in the transportation‐related elements of the State EOP. o A FOG or Handbook, such as a durable pocket or desk guide, containing essential, basic information  needed  to  perform  specific  assignments  or  functions  as  specified  in  the transportation‐ related elements of the State EOP. o Job Aids to provide detailed checklists or other aids for job performance or job training regarding the transportation‐related elements specifics  in  the  State  EOP  and  Hazard‐ Specific Annexes. o Criteria for the reporting, and (particularly) verifying potential incidents by motorists or to  the  citizens, even  from  specially  trained  individuals,  such as  road watch, volunteer spotter, and other probe programs (including transit vehicle operators). Focus.  Identify and analyze all possible hazards and risks faced by the state transportation agency and  develop response plans and procedures that can be used to safely mitigate and control these hazards and  risks.  PLAN Phase 19: Review the Plan  Purpose.   Check  the written plan  for  its  conformity  to  regulatory  requirements and  the  standards of  Federal or state agencies, as appropriate, and for its usefulness in practice.   

55      Actions:    Review the emergency response / emergency management plan from a performance  perspective:    o When was the plan last updated?    o Does the plan define and accommodate transitions from minor incidents to major  incidents?   o What major incidents have occurred since the plan was last updated?   o Was the plan used for those incidents?    o How well did the plan work with regards to those major incidents?    o Were there After Action Reports with recommendations for improvement for any or all  of those incidents?    o Were those improvements implemented?    Review the emergency response/ emergency management plan from a legislative and multi‐ organization perspective.  o Does it adequately correspond to the most recent State Emergency Management Plan?  o Does it reflect the latest federal and state regulations and guidance?  o Does it reflect updated local, regional, sister agency and neighboring jurisdiction  emergency plans and agreements, including mitigation and resilience plans and  projects?  o Does it reflect updated agreements with military installations, tribal authorities, private  sector organizations, and other entities representing the whole community perspective?   From the review, identify what improvements are needed to bring the response plan up to date,  based on your state experiences and perspectives.  o Does the plan adequately address the “five Ps”: Plans, Policies, Practices, Procedures  and Personnel?  o Does the plan adequately address changes in threats and hazards?  o Does the plan adequately address changes in agency resources, including infrastructure,  equipment and personnel?  o Does the plan adequately address changes in the broader geographic and institutional  context?  o What is needed to transform or help the response plan evolve into an overall  emergency plan?  o Look for major missing elements that are included in this guide, from the full emergency  planning cycle, in particular mitigation.   o Look for other potential gaps in the plan. Templates adapted from Tennessee DOT  frameworks (Appendix F) and the Self‐Assessment Checklist (Appendix A) may help.   Focus. Review and evaluate the EOP to determine its adequacy, feasibility, acceptability, completeness,  and compliance with applicable guidance or  regulatory  requirements. The CPG 101 v.2 definitions  for  these measures are included below.  

56        Adequacy: A plan can be considered adequate if the   Scope and concept of planned response operations identify and address critical tasks  effectively;   Assigned mission can be accomplished while complying with guidance; and   Assumptions are valid, reasonable, and comply with guidance.  Feasibility: A plan can be considered feasible if the   Organization can accomplish the assigned mission and critical tasks by using available  resources within the time contemplated by the plan; and   Available resources, including internal assets as well as those that can be gained  through mutual‐aid or existing state, regional, or federal assistance agreements, are  allocated to tasks and tracked by status (assigned, out of service, etc.)  Acceptability: A plan can be considered acceptable if it   Meets the needs and demands driven by the threat or event, meets decision maker  and public cost and time limitations, and is consistent with the law; and   Can be justified in terms of the cost of resources and if its scale is proportional to  mission requirements.   In addition, verify that risk management procedures have identified, assessed, and  applied control measures to mitigate operational risk.  Completeness: A plan can be considered complete if it   Incorporates all tasks to be accomplished;   Includes all required capabilities;   Provides a complete picture of the sequence and scope of the planned response  operation (i.e., what should happen, when, and at whose direction);   Includes time estimates for achieving objectives; and   Identifies success criteria and a desired end‐state.   Integrates the needs of the general population, children of all ages, individuals with  disabilities and others with access and functional needs, immigrants, individuals with  limited English proficiency, and diverse racial and ethnic populations‐ See Appendix A  for checklists.  Compliance with Guidance and Doctrine: A plan can be considered compliant with guidance  and doctrine if it complies with all applicable guidance and regulatory requirements to the  maximum extent possible.   Include nongovernmental organizations and the private sector in an all‐hazards  exercise program, when appropriate. 

57      PLAN Phase 20: Formally Approve and Implement Transportation‐Related Provisions of the State and State  Transportation Agency’s EOPs and Supporting Annexes and Agency‐Specific Supporting Materials  Purpose. Ensure adoption of the EOPs and supporting materials.  Actions.  Ensure  review  by  those  at  the  state  emergency management  level  to  verify  that  State  EOP  transportation‐related provisions have been appropriately adopted by the state transportation agency  and addressed by  its EOP or supporting materials. Approve both plans through a formal promulgation  documentation process that establishes the authority required for making changes and revisions to the  plans. Ensure the plans are signed by the agency’s chief executive and his or her executive management  team, particularly by regional/district leadership in decentralized agencies.  Focus. Identify where to improve the plans for clarity and usefulness.  Step 6—Plan Implementation and Maintenance  The  discussion  of  emergency  planning  concludes  by  further  noting  the  importance  of  the  plan  implementation,  review,  revision,  and  overall  maintenance  process.  Because  plans  guide  the  preparedness process, it is important that they are routinely tested through training, drills, and exercises.  This is necessary not only to verify the accuracy of the EOP and its supporting procedures and to identify  and address any potential gaps, but also  to  increase  the state  transportation agency’s overall state of  readiness, as well as  that of  its personnel and partners. Because emergency planning  is a continuous  process, and the participants involved in planning and preparing for, responding to, and recovering from  emergencies  often  change  from  year  to  year,  it  is  imperative  that  the  state  transportation  agencies  establish mechanisms for ongoing review and revision of their EOPs—both the State EOP and the agency  internal one(s). Exercising, reviewing, revising, and maintaining the EOPs require two phases (phase 21  and 22), as described below.  PLAN Phase 21: Exercise the Plan and Evaluate its Effectiveness  Purpose. Ensure that state transportation response providers, supervisors, and command‐level personnel  are prepared for their emergency management roles through training, drills and exercises. Training should  provide personnel with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform required tasks in emergency plans  and  in  organization‐specific  procedures.    Drills  and  exercises  along  with  actual  incidents  and  field  experience provide personnel with the opportunity to practice what they have learned, demonstrate their  capabilities,  and  develop  discipline‐specific  skills.  Results  of  exercises  and  real‐world  incidents  also  determine the effectiveness of plan components and areas of improvement that need to be addressed.    Distribute  the plan  to all necessary parties,  including all members of  the  state  transportation  agency’s emergency planning team and any outside agencies or jurisdictions that may be involved  in emergency response efforts within the agency’s region or that could be expected to call upon  the agency to support response efforts in their regions.    The agency’s EPC should keep a record of all of the individuals and agencies to whom the plan  was provided.   It is recommended that the state transportation agency make a version of the Emergency Operations Plan  publicly accessible. Such transparency is good for accountability, for sharing with seldom‐used response  partners, and for securing necessary resources to carry out assigned responsibilities. Further, sunshine 

58      laws may  require  that a copy of  the EOP be posted on  the agency’s website or placed  in some other  publicly accessible location.   Sensitive information should be in annexes that, while referenced in the public version, are not available  to the public.  Further information on Training and Exercises is contained in Section 6. Also, see Appendix A4 for a high‐ level Checklist on Strategies to Exercise the Regional Transportation Plan.   PLAN Phase 22: Establish Ongoing Review and Assessment Process for Transportation‐Related Elements of  State and State Transportation Agency EOPs and Supporting Materials  Purpose.  Ensure  that  the  state  and  state  transportation  agency  EOPs,  procedures,  and  supporting  materials are up to date.  Actions.  Establish minimum timeframes for review as well as the specific events (i.e., update of the State  EOP,  change  of  personnel,  provision  of  new  or  additional  resources,  issuance  of  new  regulatory  requirements,  change  in  regional  demographics  or  hazard  profile)  that  should  prompt  a  review  and  possible revision of the EOP(s).  Focus. Maintain accurate, relevant, and immediately useful plans and procedures.  Prepare for the Emergency  The discussion of emergency preparedness and its role in the state transportation agency emergency  management process must begin by revisiting Homeland Security Presidential Directive 8,  National  Preparedness (HSPD‐8).  HSPD‐8  established  “policies  to  strengthen  the  preparedness of the United States to prevent and respond  to threatened or actual domestic  terrorist attacks, major  disasters, and other emergencies by  requiring a national  domestic  all‐hazards  preparedness  goal,  establishing  mechanisms for improved delivery of Federal preparedness  assistance  to  State  and  local  governments,  and  outlining  actions to strengthen  preparedness capabilities of Federal,  State, and local entities”.  Preparedness  involves  planning,  resources,  training,  exercising,  and  organizing  to  enhance  operational  capabilities. Preparedness  is  the  “process of  identifying  the  personnel,  training,  and  equipment  needed  for  a wide  range  of  potential  incidents,  and  developing  jurisdiction specific plans for delivering capabilities when needed for an incident.” (2010 CPG 101 v. 2)  HSPD‐8, National Preparedness has been replaced by Presidential Policy Directive 8 (PPD‐8) on National  Preparedness. Released in March 2011, PPD‐8 seeks to strengthen national security and resilience through  “systematic preparation for the threats that pose the greatest risk to the security of the Nation, including  acts of  terrorism,  cyber‐attacks, pandemics, and  catastrophic natural disasters.” PPD‐8 mandated  the  creation of policy and planning documents  including the National Preparedness Goal and the National  Preparedness System (PPD‐8 2011). Released in February 2013, Presidential Policy Directive 21 (PPD‐21)  National Preparedness Goal Vision  To engage Federal, State, [territorial,] local,  and  tribal  entities,  their  private  and  nongovernmental partners, and the general  public  to  achieve  and  sustain  risk‐based  target  levels  of  capability  to  prevent,  protect  against,  respond  to,  and  recover  from major events in order to minimize the  impact on lives, property, and the economy. 

59      on  Critical  Infrastructure  Security  and  Resilience  is  aligned with  PPD‐8  and  replaced HSPD‐7.  PPD‐21  directed the Executive Branch to develop situational awareness capability to address physical and cyber  functioning of infrastructure in near real‐time, understand the cascading consequences of infrastructure  failures, update the NIPP, focus on public‐private partnership, and establish a research and development  plan. Because PPD‐21 also elevated the role of the U.S. Department of Transportation to co‐sector‐specific  agency along with the Department of Homeland Security, the continued expansion of the role of state  transportation agencies in managing emergencies is expected. (NCHRP Synthesis 468)  The original National Preparedness Goal (NPG), released in 2011, identified core capabilities for each of  the five mission areas with mitigation being a new, fifth mission area added to the NPG. The new 2015  National Preparedness Goal describes Preparedness as a “shared responsibility” by the whole community  to achieve the goal of a “secure and resilient Nation.”  It retains the five mission areas in the original 2011  NPG. Core capabilities, identified and updated through the Strategic National Risk Assessment, are used  to  execute  each  of  five mission  areas:  Prevention,  Protection, Mitigation,  Response,  and  Recovery.  Because  these  core  capabilities  are  interdependent  and  shared  by many  entities,  and  agencies  have  limited  resources,  effective  interagency  and  interjurisdictional  coordination  is  essential  in  improving  preparedness.   The top NPG priorities are to implement the NIMS and the NRF, expand  regional collaboration, and  implement  a  National  Infrastructure  Protection  Plan  (NIPP).  It  is also  the priority of  the NPG  to  strengthen   Information sharing and collaboration capabilities;   Interoperable communications capabilities;   Chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear, and explosive weapons (CBRNE) detection, response, and  decontamination capabilities; and   Medical surge and mass prophylaxis (i.e., disease prevention) capabilities.  While strengthening medical surge and mass prophylaxis capabilities may  appear to be beyond the  scope of state transportation agencies, it is important  to note  that each of  the other NPG priorities  are  directly  applicable  and  imperative  to  improving  transportation  agency  emergency  preparedness capabilities. The previous discussion of emergency planning noted the importance of  developing  an  EOP  that  is  both workable  and  that meets  all  partners’  expectations.  This  is  best  accomplished through information sharing and collaboration among a broad range of stakeholders and  emergency management experts (i.e., the state transportation agency’s emergency planning  team).  While the planning phase is designed to bring stakeholders together to create a collaborative planning  team and an effective EOP, the preparedness phase of emergency management works to ensure the  EOP can meet its objectives. As to medical surge and mass prophylaxis, it is  not  unusual  for  state  transportation agencies to be involved in transportation and distribution plans for national stockpiles  and personnel to administer them.  During the preparedness phase, the EOP guides and directs the development of supporting hazard‐  and  threat‐specific  plans  and  procedures  and  serves  to  remind  the  state  transportation  agency  planning team of the ultimate goals and objectives of the agency’s emergency response  activities.  In  this manner, the EOP continues to evolve,  intrinsically  linking planning and preparedness  together  through  its  implementation. 

60      HSPD‐8  defines  national  preparedness  as  “the  existence  of  plans,  procedures,  policies,  training,  and  equipment necessary at the Federal, State, [territorial,] and local level to maximize the ability to prevent,  respond to, and recover from major events.” At the state transportation agency  level,  preparedness  is  more  simply described as  the  tasks and activities necessary  to build,  sustain, and improve the agency’s  operational capability to prevent, protect against, respond to, and  recover from the hazards and threats  that  it may  face. Based on  this description,  it  is  clear  that  emergency  preparedness  cannot  end with  the  development  and  implementation  of  the  state  or  transportation  agency  EOP,  rather,  it  must  instead  include  development,  implementation,  and  testing of other support plans and procedures that  define the specific tasks to be completed during emergency  response activities.    The  three  fundamental questions  in  the Preparedness phase of emergency management are  still  the  same:  1. How prepared do we need to be?  2. How prepared are we?  3. How do we prioritize efforts to close the gap?  Answering  these  questions  requires  the  state  transportation  agency  to  take  an  all‐hazards  approach to identifying the hazards and threats it may face and to develop tangible actions that  can  be taken to respond to these hazards and threats—the NIMS and the NRF approach to emergency  management.  It  is also  important to note that answering these questions requires the  agency to  evaluate and manage risks. Because no entity has sufficient resources to protect against every threat and  every hazard, state transportation agency investment in preparedness activities is necessarily risk‐based.  This  inherently  involves  development  and  application  of  standards  and  measures  to  assess  the  current capabilities, performance, and overall prepared‐ ness of the agency. Since HSPD‐8 was first  issued on December 17, 2003, states have worked to develop and  implement required standards  and metrics and have developed strategies consistent with the  NPG to plan and prepare for, respond  to,  and  recover  from  emergency  events.  In  doing  so,  many  states  have  established  specific  preparedness measures that state transportation agencies must meet (typically identified in the State  EOP).  The  following  has  been  developed  to  provide  state  transportation agencies with  the  tools  necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of their own emergency preparedness processes against the  standards and metrics required by NIMS and to provide additional detail on how best to implement  the agency EOP.   Step 1—Develop Approaches to Implement State Transportation Agency Roles and Responsibilities During  Emergencies  In  order  for  state  transportation  agencies  to  implement  their  roles  and  responsibilities  during  emergency events, they must  first know what their roles and responsibilities are. The  research  and data analysis phase of emergency planning recommended that agencies start  the  research  process by reviewing the State EOP and  its supporting annexes/appendices. This  is  necessary to  identify any transportation‐related activities, issues, requirements, and/or needs  that  the agency  may be  designated  to  complete or  fulfill.  Similarly,  the  state  transportation  agency should also  review  the  EOPs  and  emergency  transportation  plans  of  local  and  regional  transportation  organizations and agencies to determine if the agency is being relied upon to  provide support and  resources  at  the  local  and  regional  level.  Developing  approaches  to  implement  its roles and  responsibilities during emergencies requires the agency to complete  four phases. As in the PLAN  phase, self‐assessment checklists for state transportation agencies are included in Appendix A. 

61      PREPARE Phase 01: Establish Protocols for Addressing National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletins  and Alerts   Purpose.  Address  DHS/TSA  and  FHWA/FTA  recommendations  for  responding  to  National  Terrorism  Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletins and Alerts.   Actions. DHS  issues NTAS Bulletins and Alerts.   Bulletins provide broad and general  information about  terrorism trends, events, and threats but do not reach the level of credibility or specificity needed to issue  an Alert. Alerts can be either Elevated for credible but general threat information or Imminent for credible,  specific, and impending threats in the very near term. Agencies should implement necessary precautions  and  protective measures  as  appropriate  for  each  Bulletin  and Alert. Where  possible,  coordinate  the  activities  with  the  transportation‐related  activities  in  the  state’s  basic  EOP  and  the  Hazard‐specific  Annexes.  Focus.  Increase  the  readiness  of  state  transportation  agencies  and  improve  their  ability  to  respond  appropriately to changing threat levels and conditions.  PREPARE Phase 02: Develop Memorandum of Understanding/Agreement (MOU/A) with other Local and  State Agencies Regarding Transportation‐ Related Elements Specified in State and Regional EOPs  Purpose.  Ensure that formal plans and procedures are in place for mutual aid, as specified by FEMA in  the NRF and NIMS and in the State EOP.  Actions. Promote  intrastate and  interagency mutual‐aid agreements  (to  include agreements with  the  private  sector  and  nongovernmental  organizations  [NGOs]).  Develop  MOU/As  and  notification/information‐sharing  protocols  with  local/regional  and  state  partners  regarding  the  transportation‐related elements specified in the State EOP. Supporting actions may include the following:   Use the state/territory response asset  inventory  for  intra‐  and  interstate  mutual‐aid  (such as EMAC)  requests, exercises, and actual events.   Build  relationships with  local,  regional, state, and  federal  Emergency  Management  Agencies  (EMAs),  Emergency  Operation  Centers  (EOCs),  Emergency  Planning  Committees,  Emergency  Response  Commissions,  TMCs,  Fusion Centers  (FCs), and Public  Health  and Agricultural  organizations.  In  addition,  consider  including  regional  entities  and  other  countries  in  MOU/As.  Figure  10  illustrates  the  overlapping  interests  of  the  TMC  (called  Operations Center in the figure), EOC, and the FC. Appendix  A contains additional information regarding FCs.   Define key terms, roles, and responsibilities of  individuals, and  contact information. Include procedures for requesting and providing assistance.   Include procedures, authorities,  training  requirements and  rules  for payment,  reimbursement,  and allocation of costs.   Include  notification  procedures  and  protocols  for  interoperable  communications.  Explain relationships with other agreements among jurisdictions.   Address workers’ compensation and treatment of liability and immunity.   Provide for recognition of qualifications and certifications.  Figure 8. Overlapping interests.  Source: FHWA  Figure 10: Overlapping interests.  Source: FHWA 

62       Share agreements, as required. Review, support, and adopt FEMA’s ongoing efforts to develop a  national credentialing system.   Expand mutual‐aid agreements beyond support services and equipment  to  include  information  sharing and interagency decision making.   Establish MOUs with the owners of telecommunications, electrical power transmission trunk  lines,  pipelines,  viaducts,  etc.,  for  monitoring  these  facilities,  and  include  in  the  EOP  appropriate  responses to damage to them.  Focus.  DHS recommends that basic MOU/As  include protocols for requesting assistance,  chain of  command and control, compatibility of resources, and what  level of assistance  is to be  expected.  MOU/As developed by  state  transportation agencies  should  therefore define  the  transportation‐ related elements, activities, roles, responsibilities, and resources that the agency will  supply during  emergency response activities, as well as those the agency will receive from other  response agencies  and organizations. MOU/As should also  incorporate the NIMS requirements,  especially when  the  transportation  agency  enters  into  an  agreement  with  private‐sector  companies  or  volunteer  organizations that are not mandated to meet the NIMS requirements. Other  information an agency  may include in an MOU/A includes the following:   Definitions of key terms used in the agreement;   Definitions of participating agency jurisdictional boundaries;   Procedures for requesting and providing assistance;   Procedures, authorities, and rules for payment, reimbursement, and allocation of costs;   Notification procedures;   Protocols for interoperable communications;   Relationships with other agreements among jurisdictions;   Treatment of liability, immunity, and workers’ compensation;   Recognition of qualifications and certifications;   Future evaluation and modification of procedures and protocols;   Training and joint exercise responsibilities; and   Sharing agreements.  See Appendix A for a Checklist of Transportation Resources and a Checklist of Emergency Events Affecting  Multiple Jurisdictions, Transportation, and Interdependencies.   PREPARE Phase 03: Develop Approach to Provide State Transportation Agency Critical Services during  Emergencies  Purpose.  Develop Continuity of Operations (COOP) and Continuity of Government (COG)  plans to  define activities that must be performed if an emergency event affects access to essential  operating  and maintenance facilities, vehicle fleets, systems, and senior management and technical personnel.    Actions. Establish a common understanding with community, state, and federal jurisdictions of the  capabilities and distinct  types of emergency  response equipment available. Develop  a  state  transportation agency COOP. Supporting actions may require the agency to   Develop a state transportation agency COG Plan. 

63       Acquire or pre‐identify key equipment and supplies specified in the COOP.   Identify response resources and develop an asset inventory conforming to NIMS resource typing  standards,  including DHS  standards as  identified by FEMA’s National  Integration Center  (NIC).  When  feasible, propose modification or new  resource definitions  to  the NIC  to  include  in  the  resource  typing effort.   Identify strategies to obtain and deploy major equipment, supplies, facilities, and systems  in sufficient quantities to perform assigned missions and tasks.   Implement an effective logistics system to mobilize, track, use, sustain, and demobilize  physical and human resources. The system must support both the residents in need and the  teams  responding to the incident.   Develop Personnel Resource Lists that identify appropriate personnel available to support various  incident types. Include contractor and NGO personnel.   Develop Equipment/Materials Resource Lists that identify equipment and materials needed and  available for various incident types. Include contractor and NGO resources.   To  the extent permissible by state and  local  law, ensure  that  relevant national standards and  guidance  to  achieve  equipment,  communications,  and  data  interoperability  are  incorporated  into state and  local acquisition programs. Share these  lists with appropriate  local, state,  and  regional EMAs.   Develop  extended/emergency  staffing  plans,  including  suspension  of  vacation  and  leave  and  overtime/compensatory time provisions, and self‐sustaining teams as warranted.  Focus.  In many cases, the state may have also developed a COOP and/or COG Plan to define  the activities  that must be performed to respond to DHS NTAS Alerts and Bulletins and emergency events that affect  access to essential operation and maintenance facilities, vehicle fleet  systems, and senior management  and technical personnel. The state transportation agency should also review these plans to determine  what agency‐critical  services will be required to support COOP and COG activities.  Because state transportation agencies will likely be called upon to support mass evacuations of their  regions (or in some cases, shelter‐in‐place or quarantine—the prevention of evacuation), it is important  that they develop a formalized approach to evacuation management that includes plans, policies, and  procedures for evacuations with or without notice.  PREPARE Phase 04: Develop State Transportation Agency Approach to Evacuation/Shelter‐in‐ Place/Quarantine Management  Purpose. Ensure the state transportation agency formalizes its approach to evacuation management,  including plans, policies, and procedures for evacuations with and without notice, and  its approach to  shelter‐in‐place  and  quarantine  management.  As  noted  previously,  NCHRP  Report  740,  Transportation Guide  to  All‐Hazards  Evacuation,  provides  guidance,  tools  and  templates  for  all‐ hazards evacuation planning, including traffic and roadway management strategies, resource typing,  modeling,  and  regional  coordination,  and  also  follows  the  CPG  101  version  2  (2010)  steps  for  planning.  Appendix  A  contains  some  of  these  tools  and  resources.  Also,  Section  5  contains  information on Collaboration and Communication techniques.       Actions.  Convene stakeholders to develop and revise evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  plans.  Include practitioners with previous experience. Supporting actions may  include the  following: 

64       Identify goals, objectives, and guidelines for evaluating and updating the plan.   Identify  the  ultimate  decisionmaker,  Incident  Commanders,  organizations,  and  those  with  authority and responsibility for evacuation by position; ensure their tasks have been pre‐defined   Identify  roles and  responsibilities of government agencies,  including  transportation and public  safety, and how these agencies coordinate their efforts with each other.   Identify variations in direction and control for different types of events that require evacuation/  shelter‐in‐place/quarantine.   Conduct practice exercises  (at  least  tabletop)  to  test  the plan  for evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/  quarantine of  vulnerable populations. Be sure to include whole community partners, including  representatives of diverse groups of persons with access and functional needs, to be part of the  planning for such exercises, as well as participating in the exercises themselves.   Such planning  and exercises must follow welcoming accessibility principles, as described  in TCRP Report 150,  Communication with  Vulnerable  Populations,  A  Transportation  and  Emergency Management  Toolkit.     Identify the number and location of people and vehicles to be evacuated, sheltered‐in‐place,  or  quarantined.   Identify  primary  and  secondary  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  routes  based  on  probability and feasibility of use, survivability, ease of restoration, functional service, and strategic  location.   Identify agencies and personnel who will report to the EOC and how they will be notified to report.   Address shelters and in‐place provisions.   Document  decision  criteria  to  be  monitored  and  evaluated  prior  to  issuing  an  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  order   Identify how and when the evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine order is communicated  to  the emergency management community and to the public.   Define  specific  criteria  for  voluntary,  recommended,  or  mandatory  evacuation/shelter‐  in‐ place/quarantine  events.  Include  pre‐approved  drafts  of  executive  orders  for  evacuations  or  prevention of evacuation. Describe the time phasing of evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  execution (i.e., sequential and concurrent activities) for different levels of response.   Plan for communicating with limited English‐speaking individuals and people with special needs  (e.g., hearing, physical, mental, vision impairments). (See TCRP Report 150 for guidance.)    Address the use of public transit vehicles, school buses, paratransit, trains, ferries, aircraft, and  other  publicly or privately owned vehicles that may be used during the evacuation. (Note: hereinafter, all of  these vehicles are referred to generically as transit vehicles.)   Designate  routes  and  locations  for  ingress  traffic  and  pre‐staged  equipment,  materiel,  and  personnel along the evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine routes,  including fuel and personal  relief  facilities  for  emergency  staff  and  those  affected  populations.  Include  a  strategy  for  restricting and securing access to evacuated, sheltered‐in‐place, or quarantined areas.   Determine policies for rescue and possible evacuation/shelter in‐place/quarantine care for  pets  and livestock.   Determine  policies  for  containing  agricultural  emergencies,  such  as  traffic  control  if  stop‐  movement or  shelter‐in‐place/quarantine operations are necessary because of  the deliberate  or accidental introduction of foreign plant or animal diseases into the U.S. food supply  system> 

65      Step 2—Establish Communication and Information Management Protocols and Mechanisms for Public  Outreach  The  concept  of  communications  interoperability  requires  states  to  ensure  that  all  emergency  response  participants,  including  the  general  public,  can  be  notified  of  imminent  hazards  or  threats, and the actions to be taken to prepare for, protect against, respond to, and recover from such  events. To accomplish this task, the state transportation agency should work through its emergency  planning team to establish communication systems that are consistent across the state  and region.  Such systems should  include 24/7 event notification calling trees, shared radio channels  to  foster  information flow during response and recovery efforts, back‐up communication systems to mitigate  single‐point failures of the primary systems, and shared data management systems and/or programs.  It is important to note that some TMC software systems have notification subsystems that could be  used for this purpose. There are also commercial applications available that provide such capabilities.    As stated in the Simplified Guide to the Incident Command System for Transportation Professionals  (FHWA,  2006a), effective communication  is based on two broad principles:  1) Common Operating Picture  to  achieve  a broad  view of  the overall  situation  in order  for  Incident Command and ICS staff at all levels and jurisdictions to make effective, consistent, and  timely decisions.  2) Common  Communications  and  Data  Standards  to  ensure  voice  and  data  communications flow efficiently through a commonly accepted architecture using clear  text and ICS  terminology.  The  2016  NIMS  update  (draft  version)  emphasizes  the  importance  of  planned  communications  and  information management to provide and maintain situational awareness during emergencies and ensure  accessibility  and  interoperability  for  incident  management  personnel.  Incident  information  is  continuously  gathered,  reviewed  and  synthesized,  updated,  and  disseminated  through  use  of  plans,  processes, standards, architecture, and equipment.   Communication types can be strategic, tactical, support, or public address:   Strategic Communications: High‐level directions, including resource priority decisions, roles and  responsibilities determinations, and overall incident management courses of action.    Tactical Communications: Communications between  command  and  support  elements  and,  as  appropriate, cooperating agencies and organizations. (See Step 2 Phase 05 and Phase 06)   Support Communications: Coordination in support of strategic and tactical communications   Public Address Communications: Emergency alerts and warnings, press conferences. (See Step 2  Phase 05 and Phase 06)  The key characteristics of an effective communications and information management system are:   Interoperable  ‐  systems  that enable personnel and organizations  to  communicate within and  across jurisdictions and organizations via voice, data, and video systems in real time.    Reliable, Scalable, and Portable ‐ systems that are suitable for use within a single jurisdiction or  agency,  a  single  jurisdiction  with  multiagency  involvement,  or  multiple  jurisdictions  with  multiagency involvement. Systems should always be ready for mobilization and personnel should  have proper training to know how to mobilize them. Scalability means that systems can be readily 

66      expanded  to  support  any  incident  regardless  of  type  or  severity.  Portable  technologies  and  equipment ensure their effective integration, transport, and deployment when necessary.     Resilient and redundant  ‐ systems that can ensure the availability of communications after an  emergency or disaster. Resilient systems are able to withstand damages and continue operating  and redundant systems duplicate services through use of diverse and alternative communications  methods.    The characteristics of Common Terminology, Plain Language, and Compatibility are also  important  in  allowing  personnel  from  different  agencies  and  jurisdictions  to  understand  each  other.  Compatible  systems use data communications protocols, data collection protocols, and, when needed, encryption or  tactical language.   Technologies that can facilitate communications include:    State‐of‐the‐art radio and telephone systems;     Automated public warning and notification systems;     Internet and related computing systems (e.g., GIS); and    Incident management software    Social media.   With these principles in mind, this portion of the preparation process involves the following  two key  phases (phase 5 and 6).  PREPARE Phase 05: Establish Internal State Transportation Agency Communications Protocols  Purpose. Ensure that calling trees and notification systems, including 24/7 event notification protocols,  are established to notify state transportation employees regarding emergencies, to communicate with  them during emergencies, and to distribute emergency materials in advance of events.  Actions. Evaluate use of radio channels, frequencies, trunked radio systems, and use of cellular phones  during events  likely  to  result  in emergencies  requiring activation of  the State and/or Regional EOC(s).  Establish  predetermined  frequency  assignments,  lists  of  agency  channel  access,  and  interagency  communication protocols. Supporting actions may include the following:   Determine how agencies and specific traffic management team personnel will communicate with  each other in the field and on which channels.   Coordinate  and  support  emergency  incident  and  event  management  through  development and use of integrated multiagency coordination systems.   Develop and maintain connectivity capability between local Incident Command Posts, local 9‐1‐1  centers,  local  EOCs,  the  SEOC,  and  regional  and  federal  EOCs,  FCs,  and  NRF  organizational  elements.   Develop systems, tools, and processes to present consistent and accurate information to incident  managers at all levels.   Specify agency and interagency contact information.   Establish calling trees and notification systems, including 24/7 event notification protocols.   Prepare  an  employee  communication  strategy,  including  emergency  communication  systems  and  materials  for  distribution  in  advance  of  events.  Incident  response  communications  (during exercises and actual  incidents) should  feature plain  language 

67      commands so transportation  employees will be able to function  in a multi‐jurisdiction  environment. Revise field manuals and training to reflect the plain language standard.   Identify  single  points  of  contacts,  with  back‐ups,  in  all  jurisdictions  and  agencies  for  communications, including the protocols for which to contact under what conditions.   Define  when  evacuation  personnel  are  to  be  notified  of  a  possible  evacuation/shelter‐in‐  place/quarantine order prior to its execution.   Identify contingency plans for use if normal means of communication fail or are unavailable.  Include provisions for keeping the public informed of the estimated travel times to safe  havens under current and forecast conditions.   Identify who needs to be informed to begin opening shelters.   Identify  specific  contingency  plans  to  be  used  if  conditions  change  during  the  course  of  the  evacuation.   Institutionalize, within the framework of the ICS, the Public Information System, comprising the  Joint Information System (JIS) and a Joint Information Center (JIC). The Public Information  System will ensure an organized,  integrated, and coordinated mechanism  to perform  critical emergency information, crisis communications, and public affairs functions that are  timely, accurate, and consistent. This includes training for designated participants from the  governor’s office and key state agencies. The state transportation agency’s Public Information Office  (PIO)  will  generally  represent  the  agency  in  the  JIC  and  should  not  issue  separate  public  announcements.   Standardize incident reporting and documentation procedures to enhance situational  awareness and provide emergency management/response personnel with access  to  critical  information.   Practice sharing information between EOCs, TMCs, and, if appropriate, FCs and other  relevant agencies.  Focus.  The planning  team  represents  the  key agencies and organizations with which  the  state  transportation agency will need to communicate during emergency response and recovery activities.  Given  the  diverse  nature  of  the  planning  team,  it  is  likely  that  many  of  these  agencies  and  organizations  will  be  using  different  types  of  communications  and  information  technology  equipment, programs, and systems. While identifying these differences is a key step in the planning  process, developing and  implementing ways  to effectively mitigate  these differences  to  ensure  interoperability of communications during emergency response and recovery activities is a key—and  often very difficult—step in the preparedness process  PREPARE Phase 06: Develop Media Interface and Public Notification Systems  Purpose.  Ensure that the state transportation agency has the capability to provide traveler  and  evacuation information quickly and accurately to media outlets and the public, generally through  the JIC during major incidents.  Actions.  Develop Media  Interface Guidelines  to ensure  traveler  information  is provided  quickly  and  accurately  to  media  outlets  and  the  public.  Ensure  these  guidelines  include  appropriate  instructions  to  discourage  unnecessary  or  unnecessarily  lengthy  evacuation/shelter‐  in‐ place/quarantine  situations.  Supporting  actions—and  these  are  generally  not  the  state 

68      transportation agency’s PIO during major  incidents, but  rather are  though  the  JIC created by  the  state/local EOP—may include the following7:   Designate  (preferably)  a  single  spokesperson  to  provide  information  to  the media  and  the  public.   Identify communication tools to be used to ensure the community receives information  regarding  the  steps  to be  taken  to prepare  for evacuation,  the evacuation  zone,  the  routes of  evacuation, and location of nearby shelters.   Develop agreements with traffic reporting services.   Provide protocols and guidance to these services for involving them in informing the public.   Establish Broadcast Radio Agreements to ensure that information is provided in a pre‐established  format within specific timeframes.   Develop pre‐scripted public service announcements and messages and inform the media  on their use.   Establish Cable Television Cooperative Agreements to provide information to targeted populations  (e.g., local government channels).   Establish a process for using Highway Advisory Radio (HAR) AM stations to  provide traveler  information in the immediate vicinity of the transmitter.   Establish a process for using mass faxing capability or email to send road closure information to trucking  associations, truck stops, inspection and weigh  stations, media outlets, and others.   Establish processes for using Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS),  including Internet, kiosk  facilities, 5‐1‐1, and other publicized public information services to inform the public of travel  conditions.   Establish a process for using Dynamic Message Signs (DMSs) to provide  timely, accurate  information in advance of, and at the scene of an incident.   Identify foreign language speakers and outlets to communicate with citizens and visitors  who may not understand English.   Establish times for public officials to provide updates and inform the public of when they can expect  such updates.   Ensure the state/territorial Public Information System can gather, verify, coordinate, and disseminate  information during an incident. Accomplish this through exercises and drills of the system.   Use existing Public Information System and/or other communication systems for effective  practices and technical aids.     Social media  can  help monitor  and  gather  information,  disseminate  public  information  and  warnings  to a broad audience, help with map production and other visualizations, and match  services to needs. Issues with social media use include accuracy of gathered information and what  information to share and to whom.    Work closely with ESF #15, External Affairs.  Focus.  As  has  been  stated,  the  general  public must  be  included  in  the  communication  of  emergency  preparedness,  response,  and  recovery  efforts,  particularly  evacuation/shelter‐in‐  place/quarantine orders. In this latter case, the information provided must be clear as to the need  for  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine,  if  appropriate.  This  is most  often performed  through                                                               7 Those resources for public outreach controlled by the state transportation agency, such as TMCs, DMSs, etc.,  would be activated by the agency, but they should be closely coordinated with the JIC, as appropriate. 

69  media interfaces and notification systems that provide emergency information quickly and accurately  through television, radio, Internet, emergency call numbers, DMSs, other ATIS subsystems, and  media outlets. It is important to note that the state transportation agency is likely to be carrying out  these communication activities while providing support to the Public Information System within the  framework of NIMS. As appropriate, the agency should define its public communication protocols in  a separate plan or procedure that is maintained as an appendix or  annex to its EOP. These plans  should also address how emergency information will be communicated to freight haulers and other  travelers  and  tourists  in  the  region.  Additional  information  regarding  collaboration  and  coordination procedures may be found in Section 5 and Appendix A.  Refer to TCRP Report 150 on  how to establish and engage a community network.   Step 3—Emergency Evacuation/Shelter‐in‐Place/Quarantine Plans and Traffic Control and Management  Protocols and Procedures  FHWA’s primer, Using Highways During Evacuation Operations for Events with Advance  Notice, states that  “. . . the most important activity to ensure successful evacuations is development of an evacuation plan  that  complements a  jurisdiction’s emergency  response plans”  (FHWA, 2006c). With this in mind,  this portion of the preparation process involves four phases (phases 8, 9 10 and 11).  Capacity enhancement, traffic diversion, and demand management techniques are particularly important  in planning for evacuations as evacuations will place significant demand on the existing transportation  network.  Capacity enhancement strategies such as ramp metering and contraflow lanes increases traffic  capacity and throughput, while demand management strategies such as staggering work schedules limits  traffic  demand.  Traffic  diversion  techniques  such  as  use  of  alternate  routes  provide  the  public  and  emergency  responders with  safe and efficient evacuation  routes.    See Table 5  for a  summary of  key  capacity enhancement, traffic diversion, and demand management strategies.   These strategies are incorporated into plans, field guides and checklists, and/or operations manual. These  along with Traffic Management Plans (TMPs) or Temporary Traffic Control (TTC) Plans may facilitate the  development of an  Incident Action Plan. TMPs and TTCs should be developed  for predefined severity  levels  and  incident  locations.  TMPs  and  TTCs  should  include  specific  information  about  temporary  roadways,  traffic control signs, pavement markings, channelization devices,  traffic control signals, and  barriers; work time and/or roadway occupancy restrictions; traffic control changes on detour/diversion  routes;  inspection  requirements;  responsibility  for  installation  and maintenance of  the  traffic  control  signs;  and,  contingency plans  for unexpected  events.  Factors  such  as  safety,  cost,  vehicle delay,  and  emergency vehicle access, should be considered when developing a TMP or TTC Plan.   MUTCD Part 6  should be consulted  for  specific  traffic control  requirements.  In particular,  see Section  6B.01 Fundamental Principles of Temporary Traffic Control and Section 6C.01 Temporary Traffic Control  Plans. The MUTCD standard states that the needs and control of all road users (motorists, bicyclists, and  pedestrians within the highway, or on private roads open to public travel (see definition in Section 1A.13),  including persons with disabilities in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),  Title II, Paragraph 35.130) through a TTC zone shall be an essential part of highway construction, utility  work, maintenance operations, and the management of traffic incidents. See also Chapter 2L Changeable  Message Signs (CMS) and Chapter 2N Emergency Management Signing. For signal timing strategies during  incidents and planned events, see Chapter 11 of the NCHRP Report 812, Signal Timing Manual Second  Edition.  In addition, the 2016 ITE Traffic Engineering Handbook contains relevant information on planning,  design,  control, management  and  operations  for  transportation  incidents,  emergencies,  evacuations, 

70      disaster  recovery,  and planned events. The NCHRP Report 740 on All‐Hazards Emergency  Evacuation  stresses the inclusion of all stakeholders including transit agencies as well as considering the needs of all  populations  including  special  needs  populations  and  pets when  planning  for  evacuations.  Additional  information  regarding  collaboration and  coordination procedures may be  found  in  Section 5 and  the  Collaboration and Coordination Guides in Appendix A of this Guide.  The Traffic Management Center (TMC) deploys and manages traffic control systems, technologies, and  assets; performs emergency response, incident response and clearance functions; transportation network  monitoring  and  surveillance;  and  acquisition/communication  of  traffic  information.    The  capabilities,  plans, data, information, and resources of the TMC can be leveraged by planners to execute the phases in  this Step.  PREPARE Phase 07: Establish Applicable State Transportation Agency Response Management Teams  Purpose.  Establish traffic management teams to manage and direct traffic on highways, at  critical  intersections  lacking  active  signalization,  and  contraflow  operations,  as  needed.  Also  establish  Hazmat  response/disposal  teams,  debris  removal  teams,  damage  assessment  teams  with  self‐ sustaining  capabilities,  and  bridge  assessment  teams.  Additional  teams may  include  search  and  rescue teams, crime scene  investigators, public works teams, and public health specialists. Ensure  that potential team members are trained and qualified, and certified as necessary on equipment they  will be using. Ensure that equipment has been  inspected and  is  in working order, and certified as  required.  Actions.  Establish traffic management teams to manage and direct traffic on highways, at critical  intersections  lacking  active  signalization,  and  contraflow  operations,  and  monitor  conditions  as  needed. Also establish Hazmat response/disposal teams, debris removal teams, damage assessment  teams with self‐sustaining capabilities, and bridge assessment teams to provide emergency response  services including road clearance and repair. Be prepared to establish additional teams, if necessary.  Provide teams with Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), training, and information packets including  necessary  forms,  information  about  reimbursement  programs  and  procedures  and  required  documentation.  Teams  should  ideally  have  pre‐assigned  personnel  with  proper  training  and  qualifications, and certifications on equipment they will be using. Equipment should be  inspected  and in working order, and certified as required. Establish coordination plans with neighboring states  and jurisdictions and, where relevant, neighboring countries as well.    Focus.  Deployment  of  traffic management  teams  during  emergency  evacuations/shelter‐in‐  place/quarantine situations to assist  in managing and directing traffic on highways, at critical  intersections  lacking  active  signalization,  and  during  contraflow  operations  can  improve  the  efficiency  of  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine, access  control, motorist assistance, and  road clearance efforts and enhance situational awareness as well. Deployment of additional  teams can assist with other emergency  response needs.  If  the state  transportation agency  chooses to develop such teams, then it should also develop plans and procedures detailing when and  how the teams will be deployed, how to maintain communications with the traffic management  teams, and when and how to withdraw traffic management teams from the affected area to ensure  their safety.  In  addition,  coordination  plans  with  relevant  jurisdictions  and  states  should  be  established.  

71      PREPARE Phase 08: Prepare Traffic Management Performance Measures  Purpose. Perform traffic flow analyses to support emergency evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/ quarantine and  response  planning.  Perform  traffic  flow  analyses  to  support  emergency  evacuation/shelter‐in‐ place/quarantine and emergency traffic management and control plans.  Actions.  Perform  traffic  flow  analyses,  and  evaluate  key  performance measures  such  as  speed  and  occupancy,  throughput  and  evacuation  times.  Analyze  emergency  vehicle  access  routes  and  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  route  adjustments.  Analyze  effectiveness  of  selected  transportation roadway actions, transit system actions, and transportation demand management actions  to determine impact on performance measures. Use traffic simulation models and evacuation models as  appropriate.  For  various  scenarios  including  a  large‐scale  evacuation,  consider  scale  and  patterns  of  movement, damaged infrastructure, and secondary incidents. For evacuations, consider both notice and  no notice events.  Perform traffic  flow analyses, evaluating speed, vehicle occupancy, traveler behavior, contraflow, etc.,  and include in evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine route adjustments.   Supporting actions may include the following steps:   Analyze traffic flow of evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine routes focusing on all freeways and  major arterial roadways serving the route. Focus on egress and ingress operations separately.  Avoid left‐turn movements across traffic flow. Divert traffic flow from critical locations  (e.g., Points  of Dispensing sites in support of the strategic National Stockpile) and bottlenecks  that could cause  congestion.   Review transportation segments to establish capacity, evacuation/sheltered‐in‐ place/quarantined population location distribution, potential sheltering and care destinations,  distance between these locations, and parallel routes for each identified hazard.   Develop multiple  local flow  (feeder) routes connected to the main evacuation/shelter‐in‐  place/quarantine routes, as necessary to achieve optimum efficiency.   Test contraflow operations, including full set up and breakdown of traffic controls, safety  equipment, and materials.   Identify the distances those evacuated/sheltered‐in‐place/quarantined must travel to reach a  point of safety for each of the hazards identified.   Identify user groups potentially affecting egress and ingress operations (e.g., regional through  traffic, truckers, other interstate travelers).   Review signal timing strategies and develop strategies to address identified hazards. They  include: increasing intersection traffic handling capacity by minimizing the number of traffic  signal phases; selecting an existing timing plan with longer cycle lengths; manual control of  signal operations; a custom timing plan with alternate route movements; and a contingency  plan with an extended phase or cycle to facilitate movement along the alternate route corridor.     Analyze potential bottlenecks, barriers, scheduled work zones, vehicle restrictions,  vulnerabilities and other potential problems in advance to determine an emergency response  and evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine route. Analyze impact of traffic signal timing and 

72      adjust as necessary. Use FHWA’s Arterial Management Program19 for arterial management,  traffic signal timing, and access management.    o Plan for countermeasures (e.g., shutting down work zones, suspending vehicle restrictions,  suspending toll collections, adjusting/removing ramp metering) to address these issues.   o Develop  freeway  interchange  operations  tactics  to maximize  ramp  capacity  and  prevent  evacuation route mainline congestion.   Control traffic and respond to traffic  incidents through  joint efforts among transportation,  law  enforcement, and emergency medical personnel. Use ETO/TIM best practices.    Consider  effectiveness  of  other  transportation  roadway  actions,  transit  system  actions,  and  transportation demand management actions described  in Tool 3.4, NCHRP Report 740. Include  promising actions in analysis.    Review/modify/suspend timing of drawbridge openings and lock downs.  Focus.  Regional emergency response and evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine events are supported  by  effective  emergency  traffic management  and  signal  timing  plans  and  evacuation  plans  that  have  considered the full range of transportation roadway actions, transit system actions, and transportation  demand management  actions  and  performed  traffic  analyses  and modeling. Metropolitan  Planning  Organizations  can  provide  outreach  support  to  special  needs  populations  along  with modeling  and  analysis  support  and  access  to  travel  demand  data.  State  transportation  agencies  should  develop  procedures  for  real‐time monitoring  of  emergency  vehicle  access  routes  and  evacuation/shelter‐in‐ place/quarantine routes and coordination of traffic signals and timing to facilitate the effective flow of  individuals to and from the region—done through the support of the TMC.  Automated systems assist TMC personnel  in adjusting traffic signal timing. Adaptive signal control  technology continually collects information from roadway sensors and adjusts signal timing based on  changing traffic patterns to mitigate congestion. Automated traffic signal performance measures also  provide  cost  effective  continuous  performance monitoring  capability  and  produces  information  needed by TMC personnel to perform signal retiming.  PREPARE Phase 09: Develop Traffic Management Plans and Protocols to be Used During Evacuation/Shelter‐ in‐Place/Quarantine and to Respond to Emergency Events  Purpose.  Ensure  the  state  transportation  agency  has  plans  and  procedures  for managing  traffic  during  emergencies  and  responding  to  emergencies  requiring  activation  of  the  State  EOC    (e.g.,  predesignated  traffic  control  points  (TCPs)  for  intersections  along  the  transportation  corridor,  alternative  emergency  response  access  routes,  emergency  turnarounds,  protocols  for  communicating  and  coordinating with  construction  crews  to  support  traffic  control,  equipment  storage  sites  for  pre‐  staging  anticipated  equipment,  travel‐on‐shoulder  guidelines,  closure  and  alternate route guide‐  lines, rapid vehicle and debris removal guidelines, contraflow plans).  This phase currently addresses roadway aspects. Additional guidance that addresses all modes  of  transportation under state control or influence is included in NCHRP Report 740, “A Transportation  Guide for All‐Hazards Emergency Evacuation” and in other FHWA guidance.     Actions. Develop  TMP/TTC  Plans  with  predetermined  protocols  and  provisions  for  prepositioned  equipment for response to emergency events and evacuations/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine of different  severities and scope. Use information and data gathered in PREPARE Phase 08. Supporting actions may  include the following: 

73       Establish TMP/TTC plans for predefined severity levels and incident locations. Plans should include  emergency response access routes and alternate routes, and provisions for use of traffic control  devices and alternate signal  timing plans, and predesignated TCPs  for  intersections. TTC plans  should  also  include  provisions  for  towing,  recovery,  and Hazmat  response.  TTC  plans  should  consider all  transportation users  including  transit users and pedestrians as well as  transit and  railroad services, and dissemination of traveler information.    Coordinate the designation of TCPs with state and local law enforcement.     Consider all modes and networks  in addition to highways,  local roadways, and private vehicles  including surface transit, commuter and regional rail, subways, light rail, ferries, taxis, vans and  buses operated by non‐transit entities, airplanes, and pedestrians.  See Tool 3.3, NCHRP Report  740.    Use of  contraflow  lanes will  require  addressing  issues  such  as  transition  sections,  ramps  and  crossover  points,  emergency  turnarounds  for  emergency  response  providers,  traffic  control,  access, merging,  emergency  access  to  transit  and  rail, use of  roadside  facilities,  safety,  labor  requirements, and cost.   Consult evacuation flowchart in Figure 4‐2, NCHRP Report 740 for evacuation plans.    Establish predetermined staging areas and storage sites for each segment of the transportation  corridor.   Develop  travel‐on‐shoulder  guidelines  to  ensure  that  highway  shoulders  are  available  for  emergency use for response vehicles and general traffic, if necessary.   Establish closure and alternate route guidelines to guide implementation of closures and alternate  routes using predetermined routes.   Establish  rapid vehicle and debris  removal guidelines  including Hazmat  response  to ensure an  efficient process for clearing roadways.   Establish landing zone guidelines and predetermined landing sites for MedEvac helicopters and  traffic surveillance aircraft.   Develop traffic signal control plans to quickly implement alternative routes and close impacted  lanes on the transportation corridor. Establish protocols for communicating and coordinating with  construction crews to support traffic control.   Identify traffic control techniques to provide clear guidance for incident traffic control and allow  safe and efficient deployment of closures, detours, and alternative routes.   Identify corridors equipped with traffic signal preemption for use by emergency vehicles.   Identify  emergency  turnarounds,  including  median  breaks/crossovers,  to  allow  emergency  response and highway operations personnel to turn around between interchanges.   Identify emergency access for transit operations, including locations for access to the transit  rail  lines for emergency response.   Develop protocols for communicating and coordinating with construction crews to support  traffic control.  Focus. Evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine events begin at the local level on small road‐ ways and  neighborhood streets and progress to the state’s major arterials and interstates. As a result, while it  may not be possible to  finalize the specific evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  routes until the  geographic scope and nature of the emergency event  is known, emergency planners must  remain  cognizant of the fact that the design capacity of these thoroughfares may be exceeded during large‐ scale evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine of the region. 

74      TMCs will be able to provide real‐time roadway and bridge monitoring and surveillance support and can  help develop TMPs/TTC plans and response scenarios for specific events. For TCPs, emergency response  provider safety considerations are paramount and therefore applicable OSHA, MUTCD, work zone safety,  and related guidelines should be followed.   Planners should  identify primary and alternate evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine routes  that  have a high probability of use considering their ease of restoration, functional service, and  strategic  location. Identify these routes in the state’s Emergency Evacuation Plan, recognizing that their use may  change once the scope and nature of the emergency event is known or as the  evacuation/shelter‐in‐ place/quarantine  progresses.  The  traffic  control  and  management  portion  of  the  Emergency  Evacuation Plan (and shelter‐in‐place/quarantine plans) should address how these changes and other  real‐time adjustments to defined evacuation routes will be made to  ensure the evacuation/shelter‐ in‐place/quarantine continues unimpeded. This includes how the  state  transportation  agency  will  coordinate  changing  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  route  needs  with  local,  regional,  territorial, tribal agencies and neighboring countries.  PREPARE Phase 10: Coordinate with Neighboring Jurisdictions  Purpose. Coordinate traffic management plans with neighboring jurisdictions and countries that may be  affected by evacuation and response operations.  Actions. Coordinate plans with neighboring  jurisdictions  including neighboring  countries  that may be  affected by  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  and  response operations.  Share plans with higher  government  levels, as requests for additional resources may be necessary. Coordinate state plans with  neighboring  states,  as  evacuees may  travel  to  another  state  to  seek  shelter  or mutual  aid may  be  requested from another state. States should look into integrating plans and creating interstate compacts  that encompass all local jurisdictions through EMAC.  Use the capabilities of regional organizations, such  as the I‐95 Corridor Coalition, TRANSCOM, and All‐Hazards Consortium to assist in such coordination.  Focus.  Coordinated  planning  requires  development  of  contacts  and  working  relationships,  regular  meetings, and communication channels.  Informal partnerships may be  formalized  through MOUs and  other interagency agreements.  See NCHRP Report 740 for MOU templates.  The  state  transportation agency  should also work with  its neighboring  jurisdictions  to develop access  management and corridor management programs to improve traffic flow and alleviate congestion issues  that  may  occur  during  the  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine.  Emergency  Evacuation  Plans  (shelter‐in‐place/quarantine plans), or separate supporting traffic  control and management plans  and procedures,  should describe or be developed  as  separate  supporting  traffic  control  and  management plans and procedures. Plans and procedures  should  include predesignated TCPs  along the evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine corridor, alternate access routes for emergency  responder access, emergency turnarounds, protocols for communicating and coordinating with  construction crews to support traffic control, equipment storage sites for pre‐staging anticipated  equipment,  travel‐on‐shoulder guidelines,  closure and alternate  route guidelines, and  rapid  vehicle and debris removal guidelines.  Planned  events,  training  and  exercises,  and  efforts  to  obtain mutual  aid  provide  opportunities  for  collaboration.   

75      Step 4—Develop Mobilization Plans for State Transportation Agency Personnel and Resources  Impending  emergency  events  such  as  hurricanes  and wildfires  provide  some  advance  notice  to  emergency  responders.  This  advance  notice  provides  additional  time  to  stage  personnel  and  equipment and  fully mobilize response teams prior to the storm’s or  fire’s  impact. Unfortunately,  many emergency events, such as a large‐scale terrorist attack, earthquake, or hazardous materials  release, occur without notice, and require emergency responders to react quickly and efficiently with  minimal  information  to mobilize  and  deploy  personnel  and  resources  to  the  affected areas.  In  doing so, emergency responders must not only work to fulfill their response duties, but they must  do so while keeping themselves and others safe. To ensure that emergency responders are capable  of meeting these demands, it is critical that Mobilization Plans be developed and exercised for both  notice and no‐notice emergency events. Developing  Mobilization  Plans  for  state  transportation  agency personnel and resources requires the  completion of two phases (phase 11 and 12).  PREPARE Phase 11: Prepare to Mobilize Response Teams, Equipment, and Resources  Purpose. Ensure readiness to mobilize transportation agency response teams by creating comprehensive  Mobilization Plan.   The plan  should  include procedures  for  the  activation of  all necessary personnel,  testing of all communications equipment,  fueling of all vehicles, pre‐staging of  supporting equipment  (cones, barriers,  signs, etc.),  and  implementing established  field  capabilities  to  coordinate with  local,  regional, state, and  federal agencies  through  the NIMS/  Incident Command System. Plans should also  ensure that resource requirements are identified for each type of emergency, describe how the resources  will be obtained, where they are located, and how they will be transported to appropriate staging areas.  In addition, plans should address how resource requests can be addressed with minimal notice.   Actions.  Establish  Mobilization  Plans.  Test  all  primary  and  backup  wire  communications  and  radio  frequencies  including  remote  communications  expected  to  be  used  during  the  event,  and  evaluate  contingencies. Ensure response vehicles are fueled and in proper working order.   Supporting actions could include the following steps:    Perform  joint planning for resource acquisition prior to an  incident. Address questions such as  resource  needs  for  specific  events,  available  resources  by  agency/source,  and  how  those  resources may be acquired.   Mobilization  plans  should  include  activation  and  demobilization  procedures  for  emergency  personnel and equipment. Prior to activation, afford staff an opportunity to ensure the safety of  their loved ones and personal property.   Mobilization  plans  should  also  ensure  the  security  of  staging  areas,  TMCs,  TCCs,  EOCs,  and  emergency personnel.   Use resource management best practices to ensure sufficient resources are available to protect  responders and those evacuated/sheltered‐in‐place/quarantined.   Pre‐position equipment and resources at predetermined locations, including portable changeable  message  signs,  food  and water,  gasoline  tankers, mechanics  crews, port‐a‐potties,  and  other  items that may be stored along the predesignated routes. Periodically verify all equipment and  vehicles are fully fueled and operable, and other resources are in working order.   Track and report resources through the ICS structure.    Be  prepared  to  equip  emergency  personnel with  needed  equipment,  supplies,  and  PPE  and  provide them with  information packets  including  ICS forms, reimbursement forms, and permit  waiver forms.  

76   Prior  to  activation,  afford  staff  an  opportunity  to  ensure  the  safety  of  their  loved  ones  and personal property.  Incorporate public and/or volunteer organizations into reception and site plans. Be prepared to provide Just‐in‐Time training for all training needs that have not yet been met, including training for NGO representatives and volunteers as well as state transportation agency personnel.  Establish field capabilities through the ICS.  Prepare for implementing the required elements of the reimbursement process.  Be prepared to use NIMS inter‐jurisdictional and interagency information flow and coordination mechanisms.  Ensure all responsible agencies understand joint priorities and restrictions. Ensure that mobilization plans and incident‐specific deployment plans have been exercised, evaluated, and updated.  Be prepared to manage timely communication of instructions to prepare people in advance of the order  to evacuate, shelter‐in‐place, or quarantine. Establish and  test  internal and external communications processes and systems. PREPARE Phase 12: Administer Training Programs  Purpose. Establish employee and contractor  training and exercise programs, participate  in  joint multi‐ agency training and exercises, evaluate training and exercises, and identify additional activities to improve  preparedness.  Actions. Develop interagency training programs to provide a common understanding of the transportation  ICS  and  program  guidelines.  Establish  professional  qualifications,  certifications,  and/or  performance  standards  for  individuals and  teams, whether paid or volunteer. Ensure  that  content and methods of  training  comply  with  applicable  standards  and  produce  required  skills  and measurable  proficiency.  Leverage training and exercises provided by other agencies and organizations  including the state EMA,  DHS/FEMA, state and local responders, FHWA/NHI, LTAP/TTAP, universities and colleges, etc.  Evaluate  training and exercises, develop After Action Reports, and identify areas for improvement and corrective  actions. Implement identified changes to training and exercise programs.  Supporting actions may include  the following:   Establish employee and contractor training and exercise programs. Follow state EMA guidelines and schedules as appropriate.  Incorporate NIMS/ICS into all state/territorial and regional training and exercises.  In  general,  training  progresses  from  individuals  to  intra‐agency  teams  to  interagency  and interjurisdictional exercises. Also, activities  in  the  training and exercise program progressively become more complex.  Strive to make training relevant, interactive and specific to real‐world problems. Much learning can occur through instructor‐student and student‐student interactions. Acknowledge experience and knowledge by providing opportunities for participants to share information and practices.  Provide a chance for  learners to reflect on their training. Then, provide opportunities to apply their new learning shortly thereafter.  Conduct a training needs assessment to determine the types of training along with certifications and credentialing required by job function or position. o Identify  internal  and  external  requirements  and  mandates  (HSEEP,  EMAP,  EMPG) including training and exercise frequency, evaluation, and documentation;

77  o Recipients of EMPG funding should develop and maintain a progressive exercise program and a multiyear Training and Exercise Plan consistent with HSEEP; o Consider employees’ current and potential responsibilities; o Consider  all  employees  at  all  levels  with  emergency  preparedness  and  emergency management responsibilities, including training and exercise personnel; o Determine who  (what positions) need NIMS Core Curriculum  training;  seek assistance from the NIC and state NIMS coordinator for additional guidance; o Consider  including  other  emergency  response  provides  such  as  police  and  fire departments, local public works agencies, and contractors. o Identify what additional training resources may be needed in the community to support response and evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine activities.  Develop  state DOT Multiyear Training and Exercise Plan  (TEP); hold TEP Workshop  to  identify exercise  priorities  and  determine  schedule  of  planned  exercises,  which  target  groups  and categories  of  personnel  will  be  included,  which  exercise  type  will  be  used,  and  develop  a structured testing schedule for plans.  Participate in joint multi‐agency training and exercises; this should include an all‐hazards exercise program  based  on  NIMS  that  involves  responders  from  multiple  disciplines  and  multiple jurisdictions. Seek to participate  in exercise planning to ensure the state transportation agency role is realistic.  Plan  and  implement  individual  exercises.  Seek  to  include  all  stakeholders,  particularly  for emergency evacuation exercises.  Keep key officials, state EMA, and other stakeholders updated on exercise planning and progress. Seek their input as appropriate.  Always have a safety plan for exercises.  Perform exercise design and development activities  including development of an Exercise Plan (see Appendix F for an Exercise Plan Template), identification of planning team, identification of exercise objectives, scenario design, documentation creation, and logistics coordination.  Use  scenarios  to  identify  traffic  and other  transportation  impacts of  route  closures, detours, contraflow operations, etc.  Use  drills/exercises  to  estimate  time  needed  to  complete  an  evacuation/shelter‐in‐ place/quarantine for each of the catastrophic hazards identified and provide this information to highway,  public  safety,  and  transit  agencies  for  coordination  purposes.  Simulations  can supplement these estimates.  Use drills/exercises to estimate the time it takes to have field personnel and equipment in place to support the evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine.  Conduct  the  exercise  by  preparing  for  exercise  play, managing  the  exercise,  and  conducting immediate post‐exercise activities including debriefings and a “hot wash.”  Start evaluation planning and fill key evaluation roles at the start of the exercise planning process. Create an Exercise Evaluation Guide to document performance of personnel, plans, procedures, equipment and facilities against exercise objectives, and to highlight strengths and weaknesses. Assess  exercises  on  the  task  level,  organization  level,  and mission  level.    Evaluators  should evaluate only their own agency, profession, and jurisdiction.  Ensure that all personnel with a direct role in emergency preparedness and incident management or response complete the designated FEMA training.

78       Hold an After Action Report meeting, and develop and share After Action Reports (AARs) with  stakeholders. AARs highlight strengths and weaknesses observed during the exercise. Remember  to document the AAR development process.    The  Improvement  Plan or Corrective Action  Plan  contains  actions,  responsible parties,  target  dates, budgets, and reporting procedures for actions taken.    Track Corrective Actions to completion.    Incorporate findings, including corrective actions, into the agency’s training and exercise program,  plans and procedures.   Analyze performance trends and results across exercises and take necessary action to support  continuous improvement of training and exercises and other preparedness initiatives.   Review exercise and training TEP schedule to identify and address potential issues.     Establish or leverage partnerships with and training facilities of other agencies and organizations  to coordinate and deliver NIMS training requirements in conformance with NIMS.   Focus. Improve response capabilities and coordination between emergency responders.  Step 4 Observations  Resource management involves managing emergency personnel, equipment, tools, technologies, teams,  emergency vehicles and facilities, and is a key component of any Mobilization Plan. Successful resource  management optimizes resource use and supplies incident managers and emergency responders with the  resources they need, when and where they are needed, without delay.   Successful resource management also requires multiagency coordination and collaboration, and involves  the following activities: resource typing/identification, credentialing, planning, inventorying, mobilizing,  tracking, and demobilizing resources.    Resource typing defines minimum capabilities for personnel, equipment, teams, and facilities, and  helps agencies request and offer resources. Use your state’s definitions; if your state has none,  then use FEMA definitions; note that FEMA leads the development of resource typing definitions.    Credentialing means the validation of personnel qualifications and experience, standardizes the  authorization  to  perform  specific  functions  and  allows  authorized  responders  access  to  an  incident site.    Inventorying requires the systematic tracking of resources and detailed information about each  resource. Inventory software, technologies, and automated systems can facilitate inventorying.    The mobilization process includes incident‐specific deployment planning; equipping; just‐in‐time  training;  designating  assembly  points  for  logistical  support;  and  delivering  resources  to  the  incident on schedule and budgets. The state  transportation agency’s Mobilization Plan should  recognize that each emergency is different and therefore will likely require different resources to  control. For example, supporting the evacuation or shelter‐in‐place of a region as a result of an  approaching hurricane will require different resources than responding to a large scale hazardous  chemical release. In this example, the former may require mass evacuations of the region, while  the latter may require citizens to shelter‐in‐place or quarantine.     As stated  in  the draft NIMS update document, “coordinated planning,  training  to common standards,  exercises,  and  joint  operations  provide  a  foundation  for  the  interoperability  and  compatibility  of  resources.” By identifying resource requirements and joint planning for resource acquisition prior to an 

79      incident,  agencies  will  be  prepared  to  address  resource  needs  once  an  incident  occurs.  Estimating  resource needs requires the state transportation agency to ask: What types of events should the agency  prepare for? What resources are already available to the agency?   What resources should be obtained  through mutual aid?  Because of the recognized differences between emergencies, the state transportation agency—using the  all‐hazards approach—should therefore identify, to the extent possible, the resources that are needed to  respond to each type of emergency identified during the planning process. The agency’s Mobilization Plan  should clearly state the location of these resources and how they can be obtained and/or transported to  appropriate staging areas.   These processes help  incident managers and personnel protect  the safety of staff and  the security of  supplies and equipment, while enabling them to better direct the movement of personnel, equipment,  and supplies to the areas of most need. Next, the state transportation agency’s Mobilization Plan should  identify primary and alternate staging areas and rallying points for agency response teams, personnel,  and resources. It is important to note that during no‐notice events, the agency may need to issue real‐ time instructions to its personnel.  The Mobilization Plan should clearly define how instructions and any  changes  to  these  locations  will  be  communicated  to  transportation  agency  personnel  and  other  emergency responders during emergency response efforts.   Mobilization  Plans  should  also  identify  how  transportation  agency  personnel  and  resources  will  be  transported  (if  necessary)  from  the  staging  areas  and  rallying  points  to  the  emergency  scene.  As  emergency response efforts progress, the agency will need to communicate the estimated arrival times  of its personnel and resources to the Incident Commander.  Mobilization also requires that the state transportation agency ensures all personnel and resources are  fully prepared and capable of meeting the response needs. This means verifying that all equipment and  vehicles are fully fueled and operable, and establishing processes and testing communication systems to  ensure  information  can  be  shared with  and  received  from  the  TMC,  Incident  Command,  and  other  emergency responders. It also means verifying personnel have the appropriate training and qualifications  to  support  response  efforts;  coordinating  traffic  signal  systems  across  jurisdictions  to  support  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  efforts  as  needed;  clearing  all  work  zones  along  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  routes;  verifying  that  traveler  information  systems  are  operational  and  prepared  for  use;  ensuring  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  routes  have  appropriate signage; and verifying that adequate support supplies are available for response personnel if  it appears the response effort will last for an extended period of time.  Finally, the state transportation agency Mobilization Plan should address how the agency will maintain  the security of its staging areas. This includes emergency and security provisions and procedures to ensure  protection of TMCs, Traffic Control Centers (TCCs), EOCs, the personnel staffing these facilities, and their  functionality. As with all other plans and procedures discussed in this Guide, it is also imperative that the  agency train its personnel and exercise the plans.  With respect to sources of training and exercises and technical assistance regarding training and exercise  development, the NIC, DHS/FEMA, and state EMAs have significant knowledge and resources.  Also, the  FHWA Peer‐to‐Peer (P2P) program offers technical assistance including training and education on traffic  incident  management/planned  special  event  planning,  procurement,  deployment,  and  operations.   Memberships  in  professional organizations  can be  leveraged  to  take  advantage of  their  training  and 

80      certification programs. Organizations  include American Public Works Association, American Road and  Transportation  Builders  Association,  the  American  Traffic  Safety  Services  Association,  AASHTO’s  Transportation Curriculum Coordination Council,  International Municipal Signal Association. Note  that  training and practice can also take place through actual events. Use small events to practice coordination  and  deployment  of  resources.    Use  large  planned  events  to  practice  transportation  coordination,  interdisciplinary and  interjurisdictional communications,  traffic  control,  transit deployment, and other  measures.  Further information on training and exercises is contained in Section 6.  Step 5—Ensure Cost Tracking and Accountability  Cost  tracking  and  accountability  are  not  only  an  important  part  of  the  Incident  Command  System  structure, but in most cases, federal reimbursement programs (e.g., FHWA Emergency Relief and FEMA  Public Assistance), mutual‐aid agreements and resource‐sharing provisions and programs such as EMAC  also  require  that  such costs be  fully accounted  for  in order  for  the  state  transportation agency  to be  reimbursed. Ensuring cost tracking and accountability involves the final phase of the preparation process,  as described below.  PREPARE Phase 13: Prepare for Cost Accounting and Tracking of Expenditures  Purpose.  Ensure  processes  have  been  developed  to  track  resources,  making  certain  of  applicable  reimbursement and accountability for compliance with federal reimbursement programs and mutual‐aid  provisions.  Actions.  Costs  should  include  all  response,  scene‐management,  debris‐removal,  and  other  incident‐ related  costs.  These  costs  should  also  include  compensation  claims  for  all  forms  of  workers’  compensation, tort claims against responders, and daily wage reimbursement claims; procurement costs  associated with vendor contracts and equipment purchases or rental; and equipment and infrastructure  damage costs claims. It is important to stress conformance to FEMA/FHWA record‐keeping requirements  because this  is the only substantial source for reimbursement. Federal audits can and have resulted  in  reclaiming funds when exact adherence to their guidance is not achieved.   Solid business and management practices and good relationships with FHWA, FEMA, state EMA and local  public  agencies  and  other  key  stakeholders;  training  all  relevant  personnel  including  accounting  &  financial personnel in each program and procedures; leveraging technologies that can be used for multiple  purposes including in daily operations are helpful. Also, be sure to keep up with new legislation which can  affect  FHWA and  FEMA guidance on  the  reimbursement programs. Additional good practices  include  having  predesignated  reimbursement  coordinators,  predesignated  damage  assessment  teams,  pre‐ prioritization of routes/locations for assessments, use of unique project codes for disasters, development  of administrative packets with necessary forms for emergencies, electronic storage of documentation in  central location/drive, development and review of a Checklist to determine eligibility for reimbursement  programs, use of ICS forms, electronic reimbursement forms and electronic signatures, use of emergency  waivers, preapproved contractors,  training using scenarios  from past disasters and  training state EMA  staff and local public agencies on reimbursement procedures, asset management and modeling tools such  as a bridge management system and HAZUS to predict impact of disasters, use of situational awareness  technologies/tools and weather sensors, RWIS, and other technologies to gain better information about  the  situation  and  share  relevant  information,  premobilization  inspection  of  vehicles  and  equipment,  mapping  of  historic  damages  to  show  repetitive  losses,  use  of  GPS  /  AVL  equipped  fleet  for  fleet  management, use of After Action Reports to improve reimbursement processes, and automated van to  record damages and pre‐disaster conditions. 

81      (See Case Studies for Tennessee DOT and Louisiana DOT for examples of best practices in tracking costs  and ensuring appropriate reimbursement. Additional practices are available in NCHRP Synthesis 472 )  Focus.  Recoup monies expended during the response effort.  Respond to the Emergency  Achieving  NIMS  compliance  requires  state  transportation  agencies  to  become  familiar  with  and  understand the NIMS/ICS and NRF structure and their roles and responsibilities in that structure. During  the PLAN step, state transportation agencies seek to identify the possible hazards and risks to which their  regions may be exposed; they work to form collaborative relationships with other emergency response  agencies and personnel; they begin developing plans and procedures that will guide emergency response  activities and minimize risks; and they begin to identify the resources needed to adequately respond to  different types of emergencies.  During the PREPARE step, state transportation agencies also develop and begin to implement supporting  plans and procedures; they begin testing response capabilities through emergency drills and simulations;  and  they establish processes  for managing  resources and  tracking costs. Regardless of  the amount of  planning and preparation that takes place, however, actual emergency response activities are the truest  test of the state transportation agency’s readiness and ability to respond to an emergency, as it places  each of the preceding plans, procedures, and supporting activities into action.  To pass this test and to be successful  in the emergency response effort, state transportation agencies  must  not  only  fulfill  their  roles  and  responsibilities  within  the  National  Incident  Management  System/Incident  Command  System  structure,  but  they  must  also  do  so  safely.  Indeed,  successful  emergency response emphasizes safety at all levels. Thus, the goal of emergency response is not only to  protect the affected region and its citizens from harm, but also to do so without injury or loss of life to  emergency response personnel. All too often, the services that emergency responders provide are taken  for granted as response activities focus on saving the lives of those affected by the emergency event. And  all too often the risks that emergency responders face, placing themselves in harm’s way, to perform their  duties and maintain public  safety, are neglected.  It  is  the  responsibility of every emergency  response  participant—from  responders  to managers and executives—to  remain cognizant of  these  risks and  to  perform their duties in a manner that maximizes the safety of response personnel throughout all response  activities.  The NIMS/ICS structure is designed to provide a systematic, shared tool with which to command, control,  and  coordinate  emergency  response  activities  that  are  consistent  across  all  response  agencies.  It  is  therefore  the most useful and effective means of minimizing response risks and of maintaining safety  during all emergency response activities, at all levels of the emergency response effort.  It is recognized that the size and location of the emergency event will greatly affect the number and types  of agencies  involved  in the response effort. A crash  involving an overturned tractor‐ trailer that blocks  traffic on one of the state’s main interstates, for example, will obviously require different response actions  than  in  response  to  a  large‐scale  terrorist  attack  or  the  threat  of  an  impending  hurricane.  It  is  also  recognized  that  the  state  transportation  agency’s  role  in  the  response  effort  will  also  vary  greatly  depending on the size and type of emergency event. Given these uncertainties, a generalized approach is  taken within this section of the 2017 Guide to discuss a state transportation agency’s emergency response  roles and responsibilities. It has also been assumed that the agency will always fulfill a support role in the 

82      emergency response effort— not serving as the lead emergency response agency, but instead receiving  direction from the state or some higher government authority.  These assumptions are made for two reasons: (1) state transportation agencies already have a high degree  of familiarity with small‐scale emergency response activities such as those required by the tractor‐trailer  example  cited  above,  and  (2)  these  assumptions  present  the  scenario most  likely  to  be  faced  by  a  transportation agency.  The following has been developed to provide state transportation agencies with the tools necessary to  evaluate the effectiveness of their own emergency response processes against the standards and metrics  required by the National Incident Management System and to provide additional detail on how to best  implement and work within the Incident Command System structure. Self‐assessment checklists for state  transportation agencies are included in Appendix A.   Step 1—Initiate Emergency Response  Initiating emergency response from the state transportation agency perspective involves three phases  (phases 1, 2 and 3).  RESPOND Phase 01: Detect and Verify Emergencies  Purpose. Monitor  the  performance  of  the  transportation  network  using  surveillance  systems,  field  personnel, manual or  automated  information  sharing with  local  Emergency  Communications Centers  (ECCs)/9‐1‐1 Centers  (also called Public Safety Answering Points  [PSAPs]), and  regional  transportation  organizations.  Actions. Use surveillance systems to detect  indicators of a potential emergency, an emergency  that  is  occurring, or an emergency that has occurred. Coordinate with and alert other agencies to recognize an  emergency event  in progress  that may affect  the  regional  transportation  system. Activate manual or  automated  information  sharing  with  local  ECCs/9‐1‐1  Centers.  Coordinate  with  field  personnel  and  equipment  to verify  that an emergency event  is occurring or has occurred and communicate relevant  information to all responding agencies. Where they exist, use regional networks, such as the I‐95 Corridor  Coalition’s Incident Exchange Network, for such notifications.  Focus. Once the state transportation agency has been notified of the emergency event, it must take the  necessary response actions to support the Incident Command System structure. This means activating its  Mobilization Plan by notifying  transportation agency personnel and  response  teams of  the event and  directing these staff to report to the appropriate staging areas or control centers. The agency should also  mobilize all other resources, such as vehicles and equipment necessary to support emergency‐response  activities. Once state transportation agency response personnel arrive at the designated staging area or  command center, they should be briefed fully on the situation and begin to take the response actions that  have  been  developed  and  exercised  during  the  emergency  planning  and  preparedness  phases.  This  includes activating the applicable operating procedures, traffic control, and management protocols, and  other plans and procedures that guide the agency’s response activities.  RESPOND Phase 02: Assess Status of Transportation Infrastructure  Purpose. Receive reports  from automated systems,  field personnel,  law enforcement, and/or a Fusion  Center regarding the status of the transportation infrastructure. 

83      Actions. Receive cell phone calls from motorist(s) to report incidents and conditions directly to the state  transportation  agency. Receive  reports  from  road watch,  first observer,  volunteer  spotter,  and other  probe programs  to enable  specially  trained  individuals  (including  transit vehicle operators)  to provide  information by radio or cell phone. If available/applicable, use automated vehicle location (AVL) identifiers  in  vehicles  that  travel  a  transportation  corridor  regularly  to  track  vehicle movement  and  compare  it  against anticipated travel times to identify delays and potential incidents. Where available, use cell phone  tracking  data  to  obtain  near  real‐time  travel  time  information.  Supporting  actions may  include  the  following:   Coordinate with/manage 24‐hour law enforcement patrols to enhance detection, response, and  site management with dedicated officers available at all times in the transportation corridor.   Coordinate  with/manage  specialty  patrols  (motorcycle,  aircraft)  to  provide  surveillance  of  roadway conditions for incident detection, verification, response, clearance, and recovery.   Operate dedicated  incident response patrols to provide early detection, verification, response,  clearance, and recovery.   Ensure patrol vehicles are equipped to help stranded motorists and some are equipped to quickly  remove a disabled vehicle or debris from the roadway.   Use  automated  detection  systems,  including  loops, microwave,  radar,  and  video,  to  detect  congestion on the highway.   Use  video  surveillance  equipment,  mounted  within  the  transportation  corridor,  to  provide  incident detection. Video equipment can be combined with automated detection and reporting  systems.  Video  can  also  be  used  to  verify  the  occurrence  of  an  incident  and  to  identify  the  appropriate response equipment needed.  Focus.  Ensure  the  safety  of  transportation  infrastructure  elements  that  may  be  used  to  support  evacuation of the affected area or response efforts. In its support role, the state transportation agency  should provide the Incident Commander with updates as to the continued viability of emergency access  and  emergency  evacuation  routes  to  and  from  the  affected  area.  The  agency’s  Emergency  Planning  Coordinator should attend, or assign an agency representative to attend, all incident briefings held by the  Incident Commander to gather and share any additional information that may be necessary to support  the response effort.  RESPOND Phase 03: Gain and Maintain Situation Awareness  Purpose.  Receive  notification  of  all  declared  emergencies  and  ensure  that  situation  reports  contain  verified  information  and  explicit  details  (who,  what,  where,  when  and  how)  related  to  the  incident/emergency.  Actions. The state transportation agency should receive notification of all declared emergencies and then  continuously monitor relevant sources of information regarding actual incidents and developing hazards.  The  scope  and  type of monitoring  varies based on  the  type of  incident being evaluated  and needed  reporting thresholds. Supporting actions may include ensuring critical information is passed through pre‐ established reporting channels according to established security protocols and ensuring situation reports  contain  verified  information  and  explicit  details  (who, what, where, when  and  how)  related  to  the  incident. Status reports, which may be contained  in situation reports, relay specific  information about  resources. Based on an analysis of  the  threat(s),  issue warnings  to  the public and provide emergency  public information. 

84      Step 2—Address Emergency Needs and Requests for Support  As emergency response efforts progress, the state transportation agency may be called upon to provide  additional  information  and  resources  as necessary  to  support ongoing  response operations.  Fulfilling  unexpected and ongoing requests for support requires the agency to maintain a high degree of readiness  and  sufficient  resources, or  the ability  to obtain  such  resources with  limited notice. This  requires  the  completion of two phases (phase 4 and 5).  RESPOND Phase 04: Coordinate Response to the Emergency  Purpose.  Activate  appropriate  plans,  procedures,  and  protocols  and  mobilize  available  personnel,  equipment, facilities, devices, and information to support emergency response. As appropriate and/or as  requested, provide field support for emergency responders at the scene, integrated through the ICS and  communicated and coordinated with the TMC.  Actions. Activate appropriate plans, procedures, and protocols based on the type of emergency. Activate  Incident Management Teams in accordance with NIMS. Activate Specialized Response Teams, including  search and rescue teams, crime scene  investigators, public works teams, hazardous materials response  teams, public health specialists, or other personnel, as appropriate. Supporting actions may require the  agency to do the following:   Mobilize pre‐positioned assets and supporting equipment.   Manage  all  emergency  incidents  and  preplanned  special  events  in  accordance  with  ICS  organizational structures, doctrine and procedures as defined by NIMS.   Coordinate requests for additional support.   As appropriate and/or as requested, provide field support for emergency responders at the scene,  integrated through the ICS, and communicated and coordinated with the TMC.   Activate  logistics  systems  and  venues  to  receive,  stage,  track,  and  integrate  resources  into  ongoing operations. ICS should continually assess operations and scale and adapt existing plans  to meet evolving circumstances.   Address  emergency  responder  transportation  needs  and  scene  access  support  and  staging  requirements.   Identify  available  transportation  equipment,  facilities,  personnel,  devices,  and  information  to  support emergency response.   Assign transportation agency resources to move materials, personnel, and supplies as requested  by responders.   Track resource status.   If appropriate, support hazardous materials containment response and damage assessment by  using available capabilities coordinated with on‐scene field response through the ICS.   Ensure that nonhazardous materials, particularly small vehicle fluid spills, are removed from the  transportation facility—initially travel lanes/tracks—as quickly as possible.   Attend regular briefings at the incident site regarding the situation, incident action plan, response  objectives, and strategy, with full opportunity for transportation contributions and identification  of resources and capabilities to support the response effort and action plan.   Perform damage assessment responsibilities for affected transportation system elements.   Make/recommend decisions regarding closures, contraflow operations, restrictions, and priority  repairs. 

85       Coordinate  assessments  and  decisions  made  regarding  the  operational  capabilities  of  the  transportation  system with  affected  parties  (emergency  responders;  local,  state,  and  federal  government; etc.).   Initiate priority clean‐up, repair, and restoration activities,  including the use of contractors and  emergency procurement authorities.   Review and, as necessary, terminate existing work zone activities and/or closures to the extent  possible.   Obtain  incident  status  briefings  and  anticipate  changing  conditions  (wind  direction, weather,  plume direction, etc.).   Based on all available information, develop detours and diversions (as necessary) to direct traffic  safely away from the affected area and/or damaged infrastructure.   Prioritize and clearly communicate incident requirements so resources can be efficiently matched,  typed, and mobilized to support emergency operations. Initiate traffic management operations  and control strategies.   Provide public information/traveler alerts on the status of the transportation system.   Assign personnel to Regional and State EOCs to coordinate with and assist public safety agencies  and other agencies involved in disaster response and recovery efforts.   Support communications between transportation personnel and their families/friends.  Focus.  Improve emergency response capabilities.  RESPOND Phase 05: Evaluate Need for Additional Assistance from Neighboring States, Jurisdictions, and/or  Federal Government  Purpose. Coordinate requests for additional support with appropriate jurisdictions following previously  established mutual‐aid plans.  Actions. Evaluate the need for additional resources and whether to request assistance from other states  using interstate mutual‐aid and assistance agreements, such as the EMAC. If the incident overwhelms  state and mutual‐aid resources, then the governor should request federal assistance and/or deploy the  State Department of Military/National Guard.  Focus. Determine whether to enact MOU/As to gain additional assistance as necessary to respond to the  emergency event.  Step 3—Manage Evacuations, Shelter‐in‐Place, or Quarantine  Once  ordered,  all  parties must  support  the  decision  to  evacuate,  shelter‐in‐place,  or  quarantine  an  affected  area.  Perhaps  the most  significant  role  a  state  transportation  agency  will  play  during  the  emergency response effort is that of helping to manage the evacuation/ shelter‐in‐place/quarantine of  the affected region(s). Once the decision is made and the state has activated its Emergency Evacuation  Plan, the agency must begin implementing its traffic control and management roles and responsibilities  as stated in the Plan. This may include working and coordinating with local, state, and regional TMCs and  TCCs  to manage  traffic  signal  timing, message  signs, and other public  information  systems; deploying  response  teams, equipment, and other  resources as necessary  to direct and  facilitate  traffic  flow and  remove  debris;  activating  and  coordinating  contraflow  activities  along  evacuation/shelter‐in‐  place/quarantine  routes;  and monitoring  progress  and  providing  the  Incident  Command  Team with 

86      updates regarding the continued viability of primary routes and the need to begin using alternate routes.  Managing an evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine requires the completion of two phases.  RESPOND Phase 06: Make and/or Support Decision to Evacuate, Shelter‐In‐Place, or Quarantine  Purpose. Coordinate with appropriate local, regional, and state officials regarding evacuation/shelter‐in‐ place/quarantine orders and routes.  Actions. Determine the probability of impact (depending on the nature of the event). Estimate the effects  on  the  geographic  area  and  types  of  people  and materials  to  be  evacuated,  sheltered‐in‐place,  or  quarantined. In terms of the decision made, consider the timing of the event and the lead time to initiate  the  action; weather  conditions  and  their  potential  effects  on  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine.  Evaluate the economic impacts of such a decision on the public and private sectors. Supporting actions  may include the following:   Determine  the  condition  and  availability  of  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  routes  or  controls points.   Determine  whether  neighboring  jurisdictions  have  made  an  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/  quarantine decision.   Determine the population potentially affected by the action,  including  jurisdictions that will be  hosting those evacuated, sheltered‐in‐place, or quarantined.   Determine the availability and safety of personnel to support the action.   Determine whether to deploy separate teams to notify residents and ensure their evacuation, or  other means to notify people of the shelter‐in‐place or quarantine decision.   Consider  the  personal  needs  of  those  evacuated,  sheltered‐in‐place,  or  quarantined  and  the  needs  for vehicle  servicing, particularly  fuel, and whether power and other utilities  should be  terminated for safety.  Focus.  Implement the unified command structure.  RESPOND Phase 07: Issue and/or Support Evacuation/Shelter‐in‐ Place/Quarantine Order  Purpose. Mobilize the state transportation agency activation team to coordinate evacuation, shelter‐in‐ place, or quarantine operations.  Actions.  Issue  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  orders  through  established  communication  systems  and  protocols.  Notify  service  organization,  local,  regional,  state,  and  federal  stakeholders,  including sheltering organizations, as applicable.  Focus. Implement the Incident Command System structure.  Step 4—Implement Emergency Response Actions  To support implementation of emergency response efforts, the state transportation agency may be called  upon to identify access routes to the emergency scene and to monitor these routes as response efforts  progress  to  ensure  routes  remain  viable  options  for  responder  entry  and  exit.  The  agency must  be  prepared to communicate all changes to entry and exit routes to the Incident Command Team through  the ICS structure. The agency may also be required to deploy its own response teams and personnel to  manage traffic flow and debris removal along emergency responder entry and exit routes. Implementing  emergency response actions requires completion of three phases (phases 8, 9 and 10). 

87      RESPOND Phase 08: Take Response Actions  Purpose. Implement emergency transportation operations activities as required (e.g., open/ close routes,  manage traffic flow, deploy debris‐removal teams, activate contraflow operations, coordinate to ensure  that unmet transportation resource needs are identified and requests for additional support are made,  provide and receive briefings, and support those with special needs).  Actions. Implement the Incident Command System and chain of command and/or Unified Command to  create an integrated team of multidisciplinary and multi‐jurisdictional stakeholders. Implement primary  and (as needed) secondary command posts. Supporting actions may require the transportation agency to  do the following:   Deploy  transit  resources  to  support  evacuation,  including  accommodating  vulnerable  populations, as well as resources to accommodate pets on transit vehicles and/or in shelters.   Enforce evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine orders. The Emergency Operations Team should  engage public safety officials in going door‐to‐door to ensure residents know of and comply with  the order.   Place  services at  intervals along evacuation  route(s). Arrange  for emergency  services within a  shelter‐in‐place or quarantine area, as needed.   Open  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  routes  to maximize  throughput  (e.g.,  close  toll  operations, work zones).   Activate mutual‐aid agreements.   Determine the need for and deploy emergency medical and other support staff staged along the  emergency routes or attached to those working with vulnerable populations, or within or near a  shelter‐in‐place or quarantine area.   Determine the need for and deploy debris‐removal crews to clear blocked highways and/or other  transportation facilities.   Determine the need for and, as needed, deploy sanitation crews with mobile comfort stations  (e.g., portable toilets, wash areas).   Coordinate  local  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  incident  action  plans  with  the  designated incident commander in the field and the EOC/TMC. Field and EOC commanders should  coordinate  incident  action  plans with  neighboring  jurisdictions  and  the  state  or  neighboring  state(s).  The  EOC  should  obtain  updated  information  frequently  and  communicate  this  information to those evacuated/sheltered‐in‐place/quarantined throughout the event.   Set up and monitor contraflow operations to ensure traffic is flowing safely and efficiently. Use  shoulders, HOV lanes, reversible lanes, and frontage roads for evacuation traffic.   Activate  and  strategically  station  additional  TIM  clearance  crews  if  possible  to  quickly  assist  motorists and remove stalled or damaged vehicles  from  lanes of  traffic  to preserve maximum  traffic flow.     Coordinate  and  communicate  contraflow  and  other  special  operations  with  neighboring  jurisdictions.   Coordinate with the next higher  level of government to ensure unmet transportation resource  needs are identified and requests for additional support are made.   Control access to evacuation routes and manage traffic flow.   Control  access  to  shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  areas  to  prevent  unauthorized  entry.  Include  strategies  for emergency  responders,  transit vehicles, and other essential equipment  to move  inbound against the predominant outbound flow of traffic. 

88       Provide trained personnel to support the evacuation route or shelter‐in‐place/quarantine area  (e.g., food, first aid, fuel, information).  Focus. Respond within the unified command structure.  RESPOND Phase 09: Deploy Response Teams  Purpose. Deploy personnel and field equipment to implement emergency transportation operations.  Actions.  Ensure  that  field  personnel make  frequent  contact with  the  EOC  through  the  ICS.  Address  activation of the TMC if it is not already operational (e.g. during normally inactive periods).  RESPOND Phase 10: Communicate Evacuation/Shelter‐in‐Place/Quarantine Order and Incident Management  Measures  Purpose. Disseminate  appropriate  information  to  employees  and  travelers,  and provide updates  in  a  timely manner.  Actions. Brief national, state, and local authorities and personnel (such as transit and health agencies and  Fusion  Centers)  at  regular  intervals  to  ensure  all  parties  are  provided  with  accurate,  timely,  and  comprehensive information. Hold regular media briefings to inform the media about evacuation routes  and  shelter‐in‐place  and  quarantine  locations,  traffic  and  road  conditions,  and  other  pertinent  information to communicate to the public in a timely manner. Supporting transportation agencies may do  the following:   Disseminate accurate  information pertaining to evacuation orders  in a clear fashion and timely  manner to avoid shadow or unnecessary evacuations or unnecessarily lengthy evacuation trips.   Implement  a  briefing  schedule  with  ranking  representatives  from  each  stakeholder  agency  participating in the event.   Inform  evacuees  of  available  transport  modes,  how  to  access  them,  and  if  there  are  any  restrictions on what evacuees may carry with them.   Inform  evacuees  of when  transportation  assistance will  begin  and  end  and  the  frequency  of  departure at designated pick‐up locations.   Inform evacuees of their destination before boarding public transport.   Inform the public and/or family members of the evacuees’ destinations.   Identify established websites, hotlines, text messaging groups, etc., where people can get answers  to their questions and concerns. In the event of a shelter‐in‐place or quarantine situation, inform  people of the nature of the danger and actions they should take.   Communicate security measures to the public.   Identify support services for those with special needs.   Communicate critical operational changes to the EOC and the public.   Communicate  information to evacuees on the availability of nonpublic shelters, such as hotels.  Keep shelter operations informed of the location and status of other shelters.   Communicate information to those to be sheltered‐in‐place or quarantined.   Regularly  reinforce,  internally  and  externally,  that  persons  involved  in  any  way  with  the  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine event must direct all but the most basic inquiries to the  JIC.  Personnel working  on  the  event must maintain  effective  communications  at  all  times  to  coordinate movements, share real‐time information, and track deployments. 

89       Ensure that response services from other states and jurisdictions, including first responders and  private sector utility, debris management, and similar responders, have information on available  and appropriate routes into the impacted area (including weight, height and width restrictions),  and have expedited access through neighboring states.    If your state is a “pass‐through” state enroute to a disaster, implement established protocols for  fleet toll procedures and weigh station deferrals.     Establish  processes  to  ensure  redundant  communications  systems  are  available  during  the  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  because  the  event  may  damage  or  disable  primary  communication systems.   Program  DMSs  (permanent  and  portable)  as  necessary  to  provide  accurate,  up‐to‐date  information.   Program HAR subsystems to provide accurate, up‐to‐date information.   Program 5‐1‐1 systems to provide accurate, up‐to‐date information.   Relay traffic condition information to the EOC.   Ensure  9‐1‐1  operators  are  fully  informed  of  conditions  so  they  can  respond  to  callers with  accurate, up‐to‐date information.  Use ITS resources during an evacuation to collect data and as a tool to communicate and coordinate with  evacuees,  evacuation  operations  personnel,  partners,  and  other  stakeholders.  In  shelter‐in‐ place/quarantine areas, use ITS to detect unnecessary movements that might result in innocent people  being further jeopardized.  Step 5—Continue Response Requirements  As the emergency response effort progresses, the state transportation agency’s roles and responsibilities  will  likely  change  and  evolve.  As  discussed  throughout  this  section,  the  agency must  be  capable  of  monitoring  the  response effort,  including ongoing  traffic  conditions and adjusting  to  changes as  they  occur. This is best done through the ICS structure and close coordination with other emergency response  agencies and stakeholders. Continuing response requirements involves two phases (phases 11 and 12).  RESPOND Phase 11: Monitor Response Efforts  Purpose. Monitor traffic conditions and make operational adjustments.  Actions. Monitor  traffic  conditions  on  evacuation/reentry  routes  and  adjust  operations  to maximize  throughput.  Monitor  how  the  event  that  triggered  the  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  is  progressing and if there are any changes to earlier predictions of its effects. Monitor the conditions of the  roadway (e.g., for debris or flooding) during the evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine so those affected  can  be  prepared  and  rerouted  if  necessary.  Monitor  evacuation/reentry  operations  of  motorized  transport, rail, air, waterway, and other transportation modes to determine the adequacy of available  resources. State transportation agencies may   Track  the  destination  of  vulnerable  populations  evacuated/sheltered‐in‐place/quarantined  to  notify  friends and  family of  their  location and  to develop a plan  to  return  them  their original  locations once the area has been deemed safe for reentry.   Monitor the number of evacuees moved by means other than personal vehicles to ensure that  additional equipment and operators  (such as buses and drivers or helicopters and pilots) are  requested and  supplied quickly,  if needed. This  information  should also aid  in developing  the  reentry plan, as the same transportation resources will likely be required for that operation. 

90       Monitor traffic counters and cameras, pipelines, viaducts, etc., for potential damage.  RESPOND Phase 12: Prepare for Next Operational Period  Purpose. Mobilize personnel and resources for next operational period.  Actions. Mobilize personnel and resources for next operational period.  Step 6—Conclude Response Actions  As the emergency response effort concludes, state transportation agencies must prepare to demobilize  emergency responders and equipment and restore normal operations. This requires not only transporting  emergency  responders back  from  the  emergency  scene, but  also preparing  for  the  recovery process  (discussed in the next section). The final phase of the RESPOND step is described below.  RESPOND Phase 13: Prepare for Demobilization  Purpose. Plan for restoration to normal operations.  Actions. Prepare to restore normal activities. Ensure that provisions exist to address and validate the safe  return of  resources  to  their original  locations. Develop processes  for  tracking  resources and ensuring  applicable  reimbursement.  Develop  plans  to  ensure  responder  safety  during  demobilization  efforts.  Ensure accountability for compliance with mutual‐aid provisions.  Recover from the Emergency  In many respects, once the emergency has ended, the most difficult part of the emergency management  process—recovering  from  the  event—begins.  The  distinction  between  recovery  and  response  is  important.  The  skills,  resources,  objectives,  time  horizons,  and  stakeholders  all  differ  dramatically  between response and recovery.   Recovery is typically considered to be a series of discrete efforts that take place after an event or disaster  and  is often considered  in phases: an emergency/response  recovery period, short‐term  recovery, and  long‐term recovery/reconstruction.   During the emergency/response recovery period (typically 1‐7 days after the event), assessments must  be made of damage caused by the emergency event; utilities such as power and water must often be  restored;  debris  and  other  potential  hazards must  be  removed  from  the  affected  area;  and  security  provisions must be implemented to prevent criminal activities such as looting and theft. Emergency, often  short‐term, repair of transportation systems occurs and interim transportation services are provided, if  necessary.     Additionally, medical treatment must be provided to those injured during the event; those who perished  during the emergency must be identified and removed from the scene, and arrangements must be made  to notify their next of kin; and transportation infrastructure elements must be examined to ensure their  continued  integrity  and  viability  of  use.  Each  of  these  activities  can  be  costly,  requiring  the  use  of  specialized personnel and equipment  to prevent  further  losses. Each activity must also be completed  before  those  evacuated/sheltered‐in‐place/quarantined  are  permitted  to  return  to  their  homes  and  businesses.  During  the  short‐term  recovery  period,  emergency  demolitions  occur  and  temporary  structures  and  infrastructure may be put  in place  to  replace damaged  infrastructure.    Long  term  recovery  (typically 

91      several years)  consists of  the permanent  reconstruction and  restoration of  the  transportation  system  infrastructure.  Planning for recovery (pre‐event planning) is an integral part of preparedness. The speed and success of  recovery can be greatly enhanced by establishing processes and relationships before an event occurs.  Preparing for recovery prior to a disaster reduces the problems of trying to locate required capabilities  and create policies when scrambling to manage immediate recovery. Recovery efforts are executed more  efficiently when resources are pre‐positioned, contractors have been pre‐approved and alternate facilities  are already identified. NCHRP REPORT 753: A PRE‐EVENT RECOVERY PLANNING GUIDE FOR TRANSPORTATION  (2013) provides approaches and resources for post‐event assessment and rapid recovery.  Having a recovery plan is different from just modifying or adding on to the existing emergency response  plans. Pre‐event recovery planning helps establish priorities, structure, and organization; define roles and  responsibilities;  determine  resources  to  be  pre‐positioned:  and  identify  approaches  to  support  the  recovery process. A number of considerations should be taken into account when embarking on a pre‐ event planning process. An effective pre‐event recovery process helps ensure that the recovery process  is  conducted  quickly,  efficiently,  and  cost  effectively  while  limiting  disruptions  and  improving  the  transportation infrastructure after the recovery.  To quickly and efficiently implement disaster recovery, a recovery organization with clear authority and  responsibilities needs to be identified prior to the event. It is recommended that the recovery team be  involved in the planning process and, given the demands of recovery operations, should be separate from  the emergency response organization. It is important that recovery team members understand what their  responsibilities and how they interact with the emergency response team and others involved in recovery.  As with each of the other emergency management phases,  it  is  important to take every precaution to  ensure the safety of personnel involved in the recovery operations. This is, again, best achieved through  the NIMS/ICS structure and  the continued coordination with other emergency  response agencies and  stakeholders.  In many cases, additional resources may also be available from neighboring  jurisdictions  and regions, or even far away states and neighboring countries in case of a major disaster, as well as the  state and federal government in the form of the National Guard. The ICS structure provides a simplified  means through which these resources can be obtained and managed.  The following has been developed to provide state transportation agencies with (1) the tools necessary  to evaluate the effectiveness of their own recovery processes against the standards and metrics required  by the National  Incident Management System and (2) additional detail on how to best  implement and  work within the Incident Command System structure during recovery operations.   Step 1—Restore Traffic to Affected Areas  Short‐term recovery efforts often overlap with response and focus on providing essential services and re‐ establishing critical transportation routes. During recovery operations, the state transportation agency— along with partner agencies, such as transit systems—will  likely be called upon to assess, restore, and  manage  the  essential  transportation  services  and  infrastructure  elements  of  the  affected  area,  as  necessary, to complete the recovery effort. This may require deploying specialized teams to (1) conduct  damage assessments of transportation  infrastructure, (2) remove debris and hazardous materials from  primary  and  alternate  reentry  routes,  and  (3)  repair  any  roadways  or  other  transportation  facilities 

92      needed  to  support  the  recovery  effort  and  the  phased  return  of  those  evacuated/sheltered‐in‐ place/quarantined to their homes.   Becoming familiar with the damage assessment process and who is responsible before an event provides  a head start on the recovery process once an event occurs. Multiple organizations—from State and local  DOTs to Federal regulatory agencies—are likely to be involved in damage assessment, and each may have  their own methodology and time‐frame requirements.  Timely debris removal is critical. The collection, hauling & disposal of debris after an event can  be massive and costly. States or local jurisdictions that have had a major debris generating event  highly recommend have contracts  in advance for debris removal. Another option  is to use an  emergency contract to get the debris operations started and then issue a standard contract for  the longer‐term debris management, using the time while the emergency contract is in place to  negotiate  better  pricing  for  the  longer  contract.  NCHRP  REPORT  781:  A  DEBRIS  MANAGEMENT  HANDBOOK  FOR  STATE  AND  LOCAL  DOTS  AND  DEPARTMENTS  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS  (2014)  covers  the  development of a debris management plan, contracting, monitoring,  site  selection,  removal,  final debris removal, and operational closure.   Taking a phased approach to recovery such as using temporary solutions and considering multi‐modal  approaches, can quickly restore movement to an effected area and expedite recovery.   As part of Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP), the annex on “Reconstitution” is an opportunity to  include information on which infrastructure assets might need to replaced or relocated in the process of  resuming normal agency operations. Restoring traffic to affected areas requires completion of four phases.  RECOVER Phase 01: Restore Essential Services  Purpose. Conduct damage and recovery assessments, remove debris and restore essential transportation  services in the affected areas.  Actions.    Conduct damage assessments. It may be dangerous for an assessment team to be in the area after  the event or there may not be enough survey teams to cover the entire affected area. Remote  sensing technologies can overcome these limitations.    Identify who has overall responsibility for managing debris removal.   Identify potential  staging and debris  storage areas. Be aware of unintended  consequences of  decisions made during response and recovery. For example placement of debris for pick‐up and  locations selected for debris storage can impede access needed for recovery actions.    Develop a long‐term plan for debris removal. Understand what types of debris to expect and how  best to remove/clean up those types of debris.  Different types of events create different types of  debris.   Provide information to community about what they should do to help – and not hinder‐ the debris  removal process when they clean up their own homes and properties.  An illustration is provided  on the cover of the Debris Management Handbook from the state of Louisiana that was published  in the local newspaper to clearly provide that information. 

93       Determine  how  to  accommodate  oversize  and  overweight  vehicles  to minimize  subsequent  damage to roadways and transportation infrastructure.   Conduct emergency repair of roads and other transportation facilities to restore essential services  to the affected area. To quickly restore movement to an effected area, temporary solutions can  be put in place such as installing temporary bridges or roadways or offering alternate modes of  transportation such as ferries or buses.   Facilitate  fleet  movements  of  recovery  support  vehicles  (e.g.,  power  and  communications  restoration crews, debris removal crews, and emergency food, water and supply vehicles) through  non‐affected areas into affected areas. Designate routes and supply information on road status,  height and weight  limits, and similar  information. (This applies  if you are an unaffected, “pass‐ through” state without a disaster declaration as well as the state affected by the disaster.)    Get conditional waivers  in advance for short‐term use of certain assets that may carry weight,  size, or material restrictions, if required.  Focus. Restoration of economic supply chains depend on  timely debris  removal and efficient detours.   Getting things moving again means getting obstacles out of the way, e.g. much of the debris falls on or is  pushed onto  the roads. Rivers may become  impassable.  Identifying alternate routes and getting them  cleared, if necessary, as quickly as possible is essential.  RECOVER Phase 02: Reestablish Traffic Management in Affected Area  Purpose.  Establish routes to move traffic into, out of, and/or around affected areas.  Actions. Designate routes to move traffic into, out of, and/or around the affected area. Coordinate traffic  management with restoration plans for affected communities and resumption of government operations  and services through individual, private‐sector, nongovernmental, and public assistance programs.  Establish a traffic prioritization scheme that determines which type of traffic has priority over another for  a certain location or time period.   Transportation mitigation strategies can be grouped into categories based on the objectives and methods  of the strategy, such as  increasing capacity on existing  lanes, using technology, diverting or redirecting  traffic  and demand management.   An overview of  transportation mitigation  strategies,  from how  to  increase capacity on existing lanes to demand management, organized by the phase of the recovery effort  in which they usually occur is provided in the following table. (Table 5)      Transportation Mitigation Strategies   Strategies   Recovery Phases  Short‐  Term  Mid‐  Term  Long‐  Term  Increase Capacity on Existing Lanes     Operate Contraflow Lanes   √   √   √   Utilize Reversible Lanes   √   √   √  

94  Restrict Lanes for HOV or BAT   √   √   √   Provide HOV Bypass at Bottlenecks   √   √   √   Utilize the Shoulder of a Roadway as an Additional Traffic Lane   √   √   √   Eliminate/Restrict On‐street Parking   √   √   √   Reduce Lane Widths to Accommodate Additional Lanes   √   √   √   Ramp Metering   √   √   √   Increase Transit Service   √   √   √   Increase Ferry Service   √   √   √  Improve Transportation Incident Management   √   √   √   Implement Traffic Management Technology   √   √   √   Change Signal Timing to Accommodate Changed Travel Patterns   √   √   √   Reprioritize Current Transportation Projects   √   √   √   Divert or Redirect Traffic   Revise Transit Routes   √   √   √   Construct Bypass Roadway   √   √   √   Close Selected Freeway On/Off Ramps   √   √   √   Relocate Ferry Service   √   √  Manage Truck Usage   √   √   √   Designate Emergency Responder Routes   √   √   √   Conversion of non‐motorized trails to restricted use   √  Demand Management  Tele‐Commuting   √   √  √  Staggered Work Shifts   √  Compressed Work Week   √   √  √  Passenger‐Only Ferry Service   √   √  √  Congestion Pricing   √  Vanpool/Carpool Incentives   √  Additional Park and Ride Lots   √  √  √  Increase Bicycle Usage   √   √  √  HOV Designation   √   √  √  Table 5. Transportation Mitigation Strategies  RECOVER Phase 03: Reentry into Evacuated, Shelter‐in‐Place, or Quarantined Area  Purpose. Implement a phased approach to bring evacuated, sheltered‐in‐place, or quarantined residents  and others into the affected area.  Actions. Define  specifically who makes  the decision  to  return or  remove  shelter‐in‐place/ quarantine  restrictions.  Identify  what  factors  will  influence  the  decision.  Begin  developing,  coordinating,  and 

95  executing  service and  site  restoration plans  for affected  communities and  resumption of government  operations  and  services  through  individual,  private‐sector,  nongovernmental,  and  public  assistance  programs. Supporting actions may include the following:   In short‐term recovery, assist other agencies to provide essential public health and safety services; restore  interrupted utility and other essential services  (as soon as safely possible);  reestablish transportation routes; and provide food, shelter, and other essential services to those displaced by the event.  Long‐term recovery may include complete redevelopment of damaged areas. Prioritize activities to  conduct damage  assessments, debris  removal, hazardous materials disposal,  and  repair of roads and other transportation facilities. Restore transportation support facilities to enable them to receive evacuees when it is safe to do so, and secure critical assets.  Estimate the transportation‐related damage to the areas to which those evacuated/sheltered‐ in‐ place/quarantined will return.  Determine if there is, as a result or consequence of an evacuation, an outbreak of disease or any other  health  or  medical  issue  that  should  be  mitigated,  and  the  consequent  impact  on transportation.  Determine if hazardous materials spills need to be cleaned up.  Determine  if utilities co‐located on transportation facilities are functioning (i.e., running water, electricity).  Ensure evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine routes are clear of debris and safe for travel.  Determine if public transit systems are operational. Identify any populations who should not be allowed to return because of medical, health, or public safety concerns.  Verify that injured or diseased people and animals have been attended to and recovered from the area; or if not, determine how to transport them.  Develop a strategy  for how  to communicate  transportation‐related reentry  instructions  to  the public.  Determine if mutual‐aid reentry should be accomplished in phases.  Transport  those who  did  not  self‐evacuate/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  back  to  their  place  of residence or longer‐term shelters if homes are uninhabitable.  Inspect  the  affected  area  and  provide  transportation  aid  to  survivors who  did  not  evacuate, shelter‐in‐place, or quarantine.  Ensure  reentry plans address  those people who were unable  to evacuate,  shelter‐in‐place, or quarantine themselves.  Ensure a clear strategy exists for how, when, and where to transport those evacuated/sheltered‐  in‐place/quarantined and how they may reach their final destinations.  Ensure  that  communication  with  evacuees  who may  be  scattered  among  shelters,  families’ homes, and other areas outside of the immediate jurisdiction can be accomplished effectively.  Coordinate with other authorities as to the start and end times of reentry operations, including the days of the week, geographic areas covered, picture identification (ID) required to reenter, security checkpoints are  in place, available routes and maps, vehicle restrictions, and available services.  Determine whether to update ITS subsystems (e.g., DMS, HAR, and 5‐1‐1) to provide information to individuals reentering the area.  Assist in providing traveler services, such as fuel, food, safe water, relief, and medical care, which should be available along the highway routes as they were during the evacuation.

96   Establish alternative plans  for  return  in case  the evacuation  lasts  for days, weeks, or possibly longer.  Ensure that operators and passengers have picture IDs to get back to their points of origin.  Coordinate reentry plans with other transportation and public safety officials to adequately staff reentry routes.  Coordinate operations to identify missing persons who might not have evacuated, sheltered‐in‐  place, or quarantined and been lost in the event or failed to return after the event, particularly children separated from their families. RECOVER Phase 04: Conduct Emergency Repairs  Purpose.  Develop an approach to infrastructure repair/replacement and decontamination.  Actions. Develop the approach to infrastructure repair/replacement and decontamination, determining  what can be done quickly and what will require more time.   Identify rebuild vs. relocate criteria. Consider  infrastructure condition, e.g. planning to replace infrastructure identified as marginal or inadequate.  Determine  repair/rebuild priorities. Assess  impact on network,  e.g.  repairable  structures  that restore most of the lost regional networks given high priority.  An  incident  involving chemical, biological, or  radiological  (CBR) agents will  result  in  significant disruption of services. Compared to more common natural disasters, CBR incidents involve unique challenges and require significant operational adjustments. Having a restoration plan vetted  in advance  and  facility  personnel  trained  beforehand  substantially  reduces  the  overall  time  for restoration and recovery.  Identify equipment required and contractor resources. Maintain fresh list of potential specialized equipment suppliers.  Make design decisions as soon as possible  to minimize recovery  time.   Some decisions can be made before an event, such as what design strategies to take when rebuilding or replacing existing infrastructure.  Major  repair  or  replacement  construction  typically  requires  contracting  for  engineering  and contractor services.  Have a prequalified list of engineers and contractors to contact to expedite this process.  Establish emergency contracting protocols in advance.  Identify locations for positioning of supplies and heavy equipment.  Identify right of way (air space/land) for staging areas. Step 2—Identify and Implement Lessons Learned  Many of the most useful practices and recommendations presented in this and other guides have been  developed by evaluating the emergency management processes of previous events to identify what could  have been done better or more efficiently. These  lessons  learned are an essential  tool  for continually  improving the emergency management capabilities of state transportation agencies and other response  agencies. Moreover, as presented  in  this 2017 Guide’s discussion of  the emergency planning process,  emergency planning never ends; rather, it evolves as emergency planners and response teams continue  to  learn  from new  experiences. As  such,  following  any  emergency  event,  the  agency  should  actively  participate in developing lessons learned from the event. Identifying and implementing lessons learned  requires the completion of two phases (phases 5 and 6). 

97  RECOVER Phase 05: Perform After‐Action Reviews  Purpose. Assess response activities to determine what went well and where improvements are needed.  Actions.  Identify who  is  responsible  for  conducting After‐Action  Reviews  and  for  ensuring  necessary  changes are made to EOPs, SOPs, SOGs, etc., and communicated to staff. Conduct a review of how the  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine was executed and determine how it could have been improved.  Each agency should review its actions. When multiple agencies are involved in an operation, conduct a  joint After‐Action Review to address how well agencies worked together and what improvements can be  made  in  future  joint  operations.  Share  each  After‐Action  Review  with  decision makers  and  agency  personnel  and  include  recommendations  for  which  improvements  should  be  considered  and  implemented quickly.  Conduct an After‐Action Review, a formal meeting of operation participants to assess actions, determine  follow‐up  items, and develop recommendations for  improving future operations. Include results of the  After‐Action Review  in an After Action Report (AAR) and use results to determine if changes should be  made to plans and procedures.  RECOVER Phase 06: Return to Readiness  Purpose. Incorporate recommendations from the After‐Action Review into existing emergency response  plans and procedures.  Actions.  Establish  a  policy  for  the  evacuation/shelter‐in‐place/quarantine  team  members’  home  organizations regarding recovery time and time to participate in After‐Action Reviews and other return‐ to‐readiness activities. Agencies may do the following:   Determine what equipment and supplies need to be restocked, what infrastructure needs to be repaired or  replaced, and what new  information needs  to be  communicated  to  the public  to maintain their awareness to be prepared.  Begin  transitioning  the  system  from  an  operations  cycle  back  to  a  state  of  planning  and preparedness.  Continue data collection and begin analyses of response activities.  Identify evacuation costs and reimbursable expenditures. Account for services such as equipment rehabilitation,  restocking  of  expendable  supplies,  transportation  to  original  storage  or  usage locations, overtime costs for public safety and transportation officials, materials used in support of evacuation, and contract labor and equipment.  Begin request for reimbursement processes from state and federal governments, as applicable.  Continue  to  track personnel,  supplies, and equipment  costs  to meet  the  requirements of  the reimbursing agencies.  Work  with  FEMA  and  FHWA  to  ensure  proper  documentation  is  used  for  submitting reimbursement requests.

Next: Section 5: Emergency Management Stakeholders and Regional Collaboration »
A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

State transportation agencies will always fulfill a role in the emergency-management effort - for all incidents, from the routine traffic incident through major emergencies to catastrophic events. State agency plans and procedures are expected (indeed required if the agency seeks federal compensation) to be related to state and regional emergency structures and plans. This involves multi-agency, multi‐jurisdictional cooperation in emergency planning and operations.

This pre-publication draft, NCHRP Research Report 931: A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies, is an update to a 2010 guide that provided an approach to all‐hazards emergency management and documented existing practices in emergency-response planning.

Significant advances in emergency management, changing operational roles at State DOTs and other transportation organizations, along with federal guidance issued since 2010, have resulted in a need to reexamine requirements for state transportation agency emergency-management functions, roles, and responsibilities.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!